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Brain's 'lowly' visual processor is more sophisticated than once thought When managing, assigning each task to a specialist is often the most efficient strategy. Most researchers regard the brain as working similarly, with each region specialized to a given task. But now neuroscientists have found, in rats, that the brain's primary visual cortex not only portrays the visual world but can also drive the timing of actions.
Why It Took Me So Long to Recover from I remember sitting on the black leather couch in my therapist’s office, longing to be free from my eating disorder, when she said something to the tune of “there is no recovered. You get there and then you keep going.” I didn’t like that statement. … ...
What’s Your Conflict Resolution Strategy? [TEST] So here you are again: on one side you have your goals and dreams, and on the other you have your significant other, your friend, your relative, your boss, or colleague. What do you do to resolve the conflict? This test will help you find out what's your personal conflict resolution style.
Domestic Violence & The Cycle of Abuse: Transgenerational Transmission Domestic violence and abuse are among the top precursors for developing depression and anxiety during adolescence and later in adult life. Sometimes the violence is between partners, other times it’s … ...
How To Learn New Words Quickly and Efficiently Neuroscientists uncover the secret of how our brains learn new words. » Continue reading: How To Learn New Words Quickly and Efficiently » Read HealthiestBlog.com, the new site from PsyBlog's author Related articles:Humming in Sync: How Our Brains Can Learn So Quickly You Can Learn a New Language While You Sleep, Study Finds Learn Languages Better With This Psychological Tip How to Learn Better: Evidence for Well-Known But Little-Used Technique How Sleep After Learning Enhances Memory
Why Opening Day Should Be a Holiday Last year, led by the efforts of Budweiser and Ozzie Smith, over 100,000 people signed a petition sent to the White House asking to recognize baseball’s Opening Day as a … ...
Why your commute is bad for you Researchers found that mental health scores decreased for car commuters as time spent behind the wheel increased.
Employee Conflict: Fighters vs. Flighters Categorizing your workforce with this simple "psychology" may not be scientifically accurate, but it can help keep you sane.
The cost of faking your personality at work Research suggests that people are able to act against their natures when the situation calls for it.
Promiscuous College Students Have MORE Friends Promiscuity is highly stigmatized in our culture and we often believe that promiscuous people are socially ostracized and lonely. But while slut-shaming can be a serious problem and promiscuous people suffer more interpersonal discrimination and victimization, a new study shows they actually have more friends and feel less lonely.
Boys and Girls, with Guns Dr. Peter Langman examined 48 cases of school shootings to show which assumptions are wrong and what we should actually pay attention to.
Adolescence and Making Parents Proud While the attached child tends to be happy to make parents proud, the detached adolescent can be more ambivalent about being a source of parental pride.
A fluctuating wellness The New York Review of Books has an excellent new piece by Oliver Sacks where he describes the psychological effects of cancer treatment in terms of its effects on the ‘homeostasis of well being’. The article weaves together the role of the autonomic nervous system, the progression of migraine and the repressions and releases of […]
New treatment for dementia discovered: Deep brain stimulation New brain cells can be formed through deep brain stimulation, improving memory retention, researchers report. For decades, scientists have been finding ways to generate brain cells to boost memory and learning, but more importantly, to also treat brain trauma and injury, and age-related diseases such as dementia. By stimulating the front part of the brain known as the prefrontal cortex, they have no discovered that new brain cells are formed in the hippocampus although it had not been directly stimulated.
The Nag Factor: Save Your Marriage from Control Obsession If the charge is nagging, I plead guilty. Surrender control. Surrender control. Let it go. These are words I repeat to myself often. This mantra of sorts stops me in my tracks when I am about to commit a marriage killing crime, more commonly known … ...
How to Practice Loving Self-Care In last Thursday’s article I introduced the concept of setting an intention to practice loving self-care. I will expand on the idea here and introduce you to the concept of … ...
What Bipolar Isn’t: Part I This post is one of four about four mental illnesses that are often mistaken for bipolar disorder or one another in general: major depressive disorder, borderline personality disorder, schizophrenia and … ...
Reading And Writing Between The ADHD Lines I love to read. I love to write so the reading would follow you’d think, but the truth is that, of course, reading came first. And as a child, I … ...
Research Debunks Commonly Held Belief About Narcissism Overuse of “I” and “me” not associated with pathology, study finds
A Heady Issue The announcement that a human head transplant may be as close as 2017 raises many fascinating issues, quite apart from the technical feasibility of the surgical and medical problems inherent in such a procedure. Who are you—your body or your head (with face attached)? Would a brain transplant be less traumatic for families than a head (with brain inside) transplant?