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Mindfulness: The Definition (Part 1 of 6) “Living in the moment.” “Living with whatever comes your way, without trying to change it.” “Accepting everything.” “Being happy / content / joyful all the time.” These are some of … ...
Major pathway identified in nerve cell death offers hope for therapies New research highlights how nerves – whether harmed by disease or traumatic injury – start to die, a discovery that unveils novel targets for developing drugs to slow or halt peripheral neuropathies and devastating neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Peripheral neuropathy damages nerves in the body’s extremities [...] The post Major pathway identified in nerve cell death offers hope for therapies appeared first on PsyPost.
Link between proteins points to possibilities for future Alzheimer’s treatments Researchers have found that the proteins that control the progression of Alzheimer’s are linked in a pathway, and that drugs targeting this pathway may be a way of treating the disease, which affects 40 million people worldwide. The findings are published today (23 April) in the journal Cell Reports. The scientists, from the University of [...] The post Link between proteins points to possibilities for future Alzheimer’s treatments appeared first on PsyPost.
Parent training can reduce serious behavioral problems in young children with autism A multi-site study sponsored by the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) finds young children with autism spectrum disorder and serious behavioral problems respond positively to a 24-week structured parent training. The benefits of parent training endured for up to six months post intervention. Published in the April 21 issue of the Journal of the [...] The post Parent training can reduce serious behavioral problems in young children with autism appeared first on PsyPost.
We Can Do Better: Bipolar in the Hospital Recently, a young adult child of a friend of mine was admitted to a hospital for a first manic episode. She presented in the most typical of ways with sudden … ...
Why Your Job Is Not Your Friend Are you in an abusive relationship with your job? Do you give it all the energy you have, only to feel drained after? Do you put your job before your sleep, your health, or interacting with friends? Do you feel like you owe it to … ...
The secret ingredient to dealing with depression Does the awareness of depression come with the ability to do something about it and treat it? Lots of people, maybe even you, live with untreated depression and believe “there … ...
Medication Side Effects: A Lower Sex Drive, Bring it! I’ve lost my sex drive. Awesome! Most people loath side effects of medication. My antidepressant has a side effect that probably a lot of people would not welcome: A lower … ...
How to Help Yourself Live Well It’s May and Spring is in the air. It’s the time of year when Mother Nature’s work is on her finest display. Buds are popping on trees, tulips are blooming, … ...
It Is What It Is When I told my dad how upset I was that I had not been accepted into the college of my choice, he looked up at me and replied, “It is what it is, honey.” I looked at him in disbelief. “Are you serious? Is that … ...
Choose not a life of imitation: A website urges you to tattoo a song lyric on "your skin and soul." What's going on?
Reminders for the Days You Need Extra Self-Care Sometimes when we need extra self-care because we’re absolutely exhausted or struggling with something difficult, we get down on ourselves. We think about all the things we “should” be. We … ...
No brain, no pain: It is in the mind, so test results can make it worse A common recommended “don’t” of the Choosing Wisely campaign in the United States, Canada and now Australia is getting imaging for non-specific back pain. The initiative, which identifies tests, treatment and procedures that have little benefit but may lead to harm, is indeed wise in highlighting the dangers of such scanning. The recommendation is based [...] The post No brain, no pain: It is in the mind, so test results can make it worse appeared first on PsyPost.
Judging distances: Study shows how experience may lead to misperception How long is the way from the city hall to the train station? When we estimate distances, something curious happens: short distances seem longer, and long distances shorter than they really are. Similar biases occur during judgments of volume, brightness or time. Psychologists call this phenomenon Vierordt’s law. Its independence of the involved sensory systems [...] The post Judging distances: Study shows how experience may lead to misperception appeared first on PsyPost.
Extra sleep fixes memory problems in flies with Alzheimer’s-like condition Many studies have linked more sleep to better memory, but new research in fruit flies demonstrates that extra sleep helps the brain overcome catastrophic neurological defects that otherwise would block memory formation, report scientists at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. Studying three groups of flies, the scientists interfered with their ability to [...] The post Extra sleep fixes memory problems in flies with Alzheimer’s-like condition appeared first on PsyPost.
Better social media techniques increase fan interest, engagement Due to the ever-increasing number of people using social media sites such as Facebook and Twitter, businesses and organizations, such as professional sports teams, are expanding their marketing and communication efforts to engage people with their brands through those sites. Now, Nicholas Watanabe, an assistant teaching professor at the University of Missouri, along with colleagues [...] The post Better social media techniques increase fan interest, engagement appeared first on PsyPost.
MRI study shows infants are more sensitive to pain than adults The brains of babies ‘light up’ in a very similar way to adults when exposed to the same painful stimulus, a pioneering Oxford University brain scanning study has discovered. It suggests that babies experience pain much like adults. The study looked at 10 healthy infants aged between one and six days old and 10 healthy [...] The post MRI study shows infants are more sensitive to pain than adults appeared first on PsyPost.
Caring for blindness: A new protein in sight? Vasoproliferative ocular diseases are responsible for sight loss in millions of people in the industrialised countries. Many patients do not currently respond to the treatment offered, which targets a specific factor, VEGF. A team of Inserm researchers at the Vision Institute (Inserm/CNRS/Pierre and Marie Curie University), in association with a team from the Yale Cardiovascular [...] The post Caring for blindness: A new protein in sight? appeared first on PsyPost.
How Twitter can help predict emergency room visits Twitter users who post information about their personal health online might be considered by some to be “over-sharers,” but new research led by the University of Arizona suggests that health-related tweets may have the potential to be helpful for hospitals. Led by Sudha Ram, a UA professor of management information systems and computer science, and [...] The post How Twitter can help predict emergency room visits appeared first on PsyPost.
Opioid relapse rates fall after jail release, according to pilot study It has been called a pioneering strategy for treating opioid addiction, and has already been adopted in a small yet growing number of jails and prisons in the United States. Now, a clinical trial published in the journal Addiction by researchers at NYU Langone Medical Center finds that the extended-release medication naltrexone (XR-NTX) is associated [...] The post Opioid relapse rates fall after jail release, according to pilot study appeared first on PsyPost.