Article Description
Best of Our Blogs: April 10, 2015 One of my professors in graduate school believed there was one thing that could really wreak havoc on your life. Secrets. It was the things/thoughts/beliefs you felt most ashamed about and that you hid from everyone you loved out of fear of being judged, abandoned, and … ...
Increase Your Happiness: Upregulate Positive Feelings There has been considerable focus on the attempt to down-regulate (reduce) negative emotions as a way to relieve stress, depression, and the intrusive thinking that follows traumatic events. As such, … ...
Psychopharmacologist: Antidepressants make it harder to empathize, harder to climax, harder to cry Dr. Julie Holland argues that women are designed by nature to be dynamic and sensitive – women are moody and that is a good thing. Yet millions of women are medicating away their emotions because we are out of sync with our own bodies.The post Psychopharmacologist: Antidepressants make it harder to empathize, harder to climax, harder to cry appeared first on PsyPost.
How do colors affect your mood? Watch this and find out It’s long been rumored that colors can change your mood, but is there any truth to this?The post How do colors affect your mood? Watch this and find out appeared first on PsyPost.
Belief in a zero-sum game: Scientists develop a new way to compare individuals and cultures We rely on fundamental theories about the social world and how it works to guide our behavior in everyday life. These generalized beliefs about ourselves, other people, groups, and institutions — known as social axioms — help us navigate the social world without being crippled by uncertainty and ambiguity. According to a team of researchers from Poland, one [...]The post Belief in a zero-sum game: Scientists develop a new way to compare individuals and cultures appeared first on PsyPost.
Do You Have Trouble Breaking Bad Habits Because They’re As I mentioned the other day, to give myself some comfort food for my brain as I geared up for the publication of my book Better Than Before, I’ve been re-re-re-re-re-re-reading J.R.R. Tolkien’s The Lord of the Rings books. These days, everything reminds me of habits, because … ...
Brain activity in infants predicts language outcomes in autism spectrum disorder Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) can produce strikingly different clinical outcomes in young children, with some having strong conversation abilities and others not talking at all. A study published by Cell Press April 9th in Neuron reveals the reason: At the very first signs of possible autism in infants and toddlers, neural activity in language-sensitive brain [...]The post Brain activity in infants predicts language outcomes in autism spectrum disorder appeared first on PsyPost.
Study: Amygdala encodes ‘cooties’ and ‘crushes’ in the developing brain Scientists have found a signal in the brain that reflects young children’s aversion to members of the opposite sex (the “cooties” effect) and also their growing interest in opposite-sex peers as they enter puberty. These two responses to members of the opposite sex are encoded in the amygdala, the researchers report. The findings, reported in [...]The post Study: Amygdala encodes ‘cooties’ and ‘crushes’ in the developing brain appeared first on PsyPost.
Immersed in virtual worlds: The benefits of storytelling in video games A wealth of studies have shown that violent video games contribute to antisocial and aggressive behavior. But what makes those games appealing in the first place? One possibility is that storytelling plays a role, particularly if it lets players engage in meaningful choices. A new study suggests that non-violent video games that capitalize on such [...]The post Immersed in virtual worlds: The benefits of storytelling in video games appeared first on PsyPost.
How unethical behaviour can inflate executives’ pay If you have a strong network of business colleagues who sit on each other’s board, your pay can be a lot heftier — but often at the expense of your shareholders, according to a new study by Ted Rogers School of Management at Ryerson University and University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management. The researchers [...]The post How unethical behaviour can inflate executives’ pay appeared first on PsyPost.
Signal variability and cognitive performance in the aging human brain As we age, the physical make up of our brains changes. This includes changes in neural processing in grey matter, but also in the deterioration of structural connections in the brain, which allow communication between distinct brain regions, so the brain is able to work as a well-wired network system. Researchers at the Lifelong Brain [...]The post Signal variability and cognitive performance in the aging human brain appeared first on PsyPost.
Study finds exposure to death correlated with suicide risk in deployed military personnel A new University of Utah study is the first to provide clear insight into contributors to suicide risk among military personnel and veterans who have deployed. The study, published today in the journal Suicide and Life-Threatening Behavior, found that exposure to killing and death while deployed is connected to suicide risk. Previous studies that looked [...]The post Study finds exposure to death correlated with suicide risk in deployed military personnel appeared first on PsyPost.
Who’s a CEO? Google image results can shift gender biases Getty Images last year created a new online image catalog of women in the workplace – one that countered visual stereotypes on the Internet of moms as frazzled caregivers rather than powerful CEOs. A new University of Washington study adds to those efforts by assessing how accurately gender representations in online image search results for [...]The post Who’s a CEO? Google image results can shift gender biases appeared first on PsyPost.
Mental practice and physical therapy effective treatment for stroke, research shows A combination of mental practice and physical therapy is an effective treatment for people recovering from a stroke, according to researchers at Georgia State University. The findings, published on March 30 in the journal Frontiers in Human Neuroscience, examine how the brains of stroke patients change after treatment. Mental practice and physical therapy are interventions [...]The post Mental practice and physical therapy effective treatment for stroke, research shows appeared first on PsyPost.
Scientists tackle our addiction to salt and fat by altering foods’ pore size, number Two University of Illinois food scientists have learned that understanding and manipulating porosity during food manufacturing can affect a food’s health benefits. Youngsoo Lee reports that controlling the number and size of pores in processed foods allows manufacturers to use less salt while satisfying consumers’ taste buds. Pawan Takhar has found that meticulously managing pore [...]The post Scientists tackle our addiction to salt and fat by altering foods’ pore size, number appeared first on PsyPost.
My Refuge in Reality Anyone who has followed my writings over the years, however sporadically, has witnessed my maturation. As I review essays written over six years, it seems clear that my tone has grown less competitive, … ...
How to Cope With Stress Stress is everywhere. It appears when your phone beeps in the morning, and you receive a text message asking you to arrive at work early. It comes when a bill arrives in the mailbox, when the in-laws suddenly appear at the door, or when you begin to feel sick. What makes you feel stressed? I’m […]
Do Sleep Issues in Teens Predict Drug and Alcohol Problems? Despite their seemingly boundless energy—and propensity to stay up late at night—teens need more sleep than adults.
Depression and Eating  There is a relationship between depression and eating. If you suffer from, or have suffered from a bout of depression, you know what I am talking about. For me this … ...
What is going on in your brain when you sleep? Sleep has profound importance in our lives, such that we spend a considerable proportion of our time engaging in it. Sleep enables the body, including the brain, to recover metabolically, but contemporary research has been moving to focus on the active rather than recuperative role that sleep has on our brain and behaviour. Sleep is [...]The post What is going on in your brain when you sleep? appeared first on PsyPost.