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The Feeling That Expands Time and Increases Well-Being The emotion which makes people feel time-rich, provides a psychological boost and more... » Continue reading: The Feeling That Expands Time and Increases Well-Being » Read HealthiestBlog.com, the new site from PsyBlog's author Related articles:A Counter-Intuitive Remedy to Feeling Short of Time Sense of Belonging Increases Meaningfulness of Life Depression Alleviated By Feeling Connected to a Group The Universal Feeling in All Human Communication Revealed by Massive Study The Peaceful Mind: 5 Step Guide to Feeling Relaxed Fast
If You Judge People, You Have No Time To Love Them. "If You Judge People, You Have No Time To Love Them." Mother Teresa Our judgments interfere with many of our relationships. Often we get so consumed with everything our spouse, child, friend or co-worker is not doing right, that we often forget to see what is special and wonderful about them.
Scientists use brain stimulation to boost creativity, set stage to potentially treat depression The first direct evidence has been found demonstrating that a low dose of electric current can enhance the brain's natural alpha oscillations to boost creativity by an average of 7.4 percent. Next up: using the method to treat depression, scientists say.
Increasing evidence points to inflammation as source of nervous system manifestations of Lyme disease About 15 percent of patients with Lyme disease develop peripheral and central nervous system involvement, often accompanied by debilitating and painful symptoms. New research indicates that inflammation plays a causal role in the array of neurologic changes associated with Lyme disease. The investigators also showed that the anti-inflammatory drug dexamethasone prevents many of these reactions.
Novel mechanism involved in attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, study shows Researchers have found, in animal models, that the absence of a certain enzyme causes a syndrome resembling the attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). The study paves the way for a greater understanding of this childhood and adolescent disease, aiming at innovative therapeutic approaches.
A sniff of happiness: Chemicals in sweat may convey positive emotion Humans may be able to communicate positive emotions like happiness through the smell of our sweat, according to new research published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science. The research indicates that we produce chemical compounds, or chemosignals, when we experience happiness that are detectable by others who smell our sweat.
Pop Up Articles: Recommended for You? In the modern age we have experts tracking what we read on the Internet; knowing that, often times I get disturbed when I see the suggested articles that pop up … ...
I Ain't Got No Body A former prosecutor offers collection of U.S. homicide cases that went to trial, despite having no body.
6 Ways To Increase Intimacy & Connection In Your... Would you like to feel more connected with your partner? If you aren’t with a partner right now, you can use these ideas in any relationship (well, most of them). Your kids crave connection, your … ...
Spring Cleaning of the Psyche Don’t insist on going where you think you want to go. Ask the way to the Spring. Your living pieces will form a harmony. ~ Rumi With all the chaos in our world, information overload on our computers, and daily tests of our emotional equilibrium, … ...
Are Friends Good for My Health? Around the world and in all cultures, the healthiest people belong to some kind of community, have close friends, and feel connected with the whole of humanity. In fact, all … ...
Are You Self Medicating?   Dangers of Self Medicating It is not uncommon for people who have mood disorders to consider using nontraditional means to manage their moods. This often leads to the use … ...
The Most Painful Word: Unwanted In 2013, a 15-year-old named Davion Navar Henry Only stood before a church congregation and asked for someone, anyone, to adopt him. He had bounced around the foster care system … ...
Dealing with Obesity in a Calorie-Filled World It’s a point made in virtually every study on our nation’s obesity epidemic: It’s never been easier to overeat – or less necessary. Our high-tech world means there’s seldom a … ...
Faculty in Doctoral Programs More Responsive to White Male Prospective Students, Study Finds Women and minorities collectively significantly more likely to be ignored
Divorce tied to increased heart attack risk Women who have been divorced once, or men who have been divorced at least twice, are more likely to have a heart attack than people who get and stay married.
Constant praise may be damaging children The solution is not to stop praising children, but to praise appropriately.
Eight nutrients to protect the aging brain Brain health is the second most important component in maintaining a healthy lifestyle according to a 2014 AARP study. As people age they can experience a range of cognitive issues from decreased critical thinking to dementia and Alzheimer’s disease. Researchers write about eight nutrients that may help keep your brain in good shape.
Study finds the brain processes athletic and monetary successes similarly Soccer fans hold their breath in situations like these: Two players on a team are in front of the opponent’s goal with the attacking player having to make an important decision: Is it better to pass the ball to the teammate or to take the shot yourself? What happens in the brain during the course [...] The post Study finds the brain processes athletic and monetary successes similarly appeared first on PsyPost.
Children who understand others’ perspectives found to be more popular among peers Preschoolers and school-age children who are good at identifying what others want, think, and feel are more popular in school than their peers who aren’t as socially adept. That’s the conclusion of a new meta-analysis–a type of study that looks at the results of many different studies–out of Australia. The study was done at the [...] The post Children who understand others’ perspectives found to be more popular among peers appeared first on PsyPost.