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Apparently You Can Microwave Meatballs Well, haven’t been out on the scene in a long time but somehow ended up in an Uber car singing out the window down Hollywood Blvd. I haven’t been depressed, … ...
Tireless Advocate for Marriage Equality Now Wants Equality for... I’ve been hoping this would happen for well over a decade. As I watched so many people put so much of their time and their effort and their heart into … ...
Epilepsy has been found to reduce the generation of new neurons The mission of neural stem cells located in the hippocampus, one of the main regions of the brain, is to generate new neurons during the adult life of mammals, and their function is to participate in certain types of learning and responses to anxiety and stress. New research has discovered that hippocampal neural stem cells in the case of epilepsy stop generating new neurons and are turned into reactive astrocytes, a cell type that promotes inflammation and alters communication between neurons. Now the researchers are exploring the potential of neural stem cells in future therapies to fight the disease.
Researchers discover new ways to shut down signals involved in brain diseases A research team has found new ways to block a pathway that may be responsible for several brain disorders, which could open the door to developing better treatments. Their work is focused on the protein NOS-1, which generates nitric oxide, a chemical signal that is linked to neurological disorders from neurodegeneration, stroke and chronic pain sensitivity to anxiety and depressive disorders.
Yoga and chronic pain have opposite effects on brain gray matter Chronic pain is known to cause brain anatomy changes and impairments, but yoga can be an important tool for preventing or even reversing the effects of chronic pain on the brain, according to a new study.
3 Strategies for Controlling (or Being Controlled By) Your... Reactivity and defensiveness is deceptively destructive. It throws off the energy (emotions and heart) of the body — and when your heart is off balance, so are you, logically speaking. … ...
Best of Our Blogs: May 15, 2015 I’ve had a lifelong battle with expressing myself when it matters most. It’s always been easier to hide behind my true thoughts by nodding, staying quiet and pretending to be agreeable. But life doesn’t favor conformity. It doesn’t bring out the brass band for copy cats. … ...
… You might have ADHD You know you can’t just say you have ADHD, right? In fact, if you go around saying it without having a valid diagnosis, there’s a chance you’ll upset someone who … ...
We’re happy and we know it, and now the research shows it If you have a spring in your step and a smile on your face, you’re in good company. Americans are generally a pretty happy bunch, according to a new study that aims to further our collective understanding of happiness and its root causes. With age comes happiness. Beginning with 30- to 34-year-olds, every age group gets progressively happier than the general population, peaking among those aged 65 and older.
Returning Home After College: Unexpected Benefits If you are returning home after college or you are a parent with a graduate returning home—You are not alone. According to Dr. Jeffrey Arnett, who developed the theory and … ...
Grit's Dilemma It should come as no surprise that athletics is ready to jump on the grit-wagon. Is it ready for the bright lights of big time athletics?
Stress-O-Meter Stopping Stress/Distress Using the Power of The “Observer” Recognizing distress, and having an awareness of how intense your pain is, without running is the beginning of managing it. With that … ...
WATCH: Odd things scientists have seen in the brain — and how they saw them Sometimes things get a little weird in fMRI machines. The post WATCH: Odd things scientists have seen in the brain — and how they saw them appeared first on PsyPost.
Astrocytes play a key role in bodily functions we undertake ‘without thinking’ Chewing, breathing, and other regular bodily functions that we undertake “without thinking” actually do require the involvement of our brain, but the question of how the brain programs such regular functions intrigues scientists. A team lead by Arlette Kolta, a professor at the University of Montreal’s Faculty of Dentistry, has shown that astrocytes play a [...] The post Astrocytes play a key role in bodily functions we undertake ‘without thinking’ appeared first on PsyPost.
Smaller volumes in certain regions of the brain could lead to increased likelihood of drug addiction An article published online in Brain: A Journal of Neurology has found that individual differences in brain structure could help to determine the risk for future drug addiction. The study found that occasional users who subsequently increased their drug use compared with those who did not, showed brain structural differences when they started using drugs. In [...] The post Smaller volumes in certain regions of the brain could lead to increased likelihood of drug addiction appeared first on PsyPost.
New research suggests belief in afterlife preserves hope when thinking about death The prospect of death does not necessarily leave people feeling hopelessly mortal but depends rather on afterlife belief, suggests new research from psychologists at the University of Kent. Dr Arnaud Wisman and Dr Nathan Heflick, of the University’s School of Psychology, set out to establish in four separate studies whether people lose hope when thinking [...] The post New research suggests belief in afterlife preserves hope when thinking about death appeared first on PsyPost.
The effect of incentives on the evolution of cooperation Social dilemmas, in which an individual profits from selfishness, unless the whole group chooses the selfish option, have long provided an academic challenge. A new study publishing in PLOS Computational Biology theoretically analyzes the effects of incentives and meta-incentives on resolving social dilemmas. Soka University researcher Dr Isamu Okada and colleagues devise and analyze a [...] The post The effect of incentives on the evolution of cooperation appeared first on PsyPost.
Blue and black, or white and gold? Three perspectives on ‘The Dress’ When you look at this photograph, what colors are the dress? Some see blue and black stripes, others see white and gold stripes. This striking variation took the internet by storm in February; now Current Biology is publishing three short papers on why the image is seen differently by different observers, and what this tells [...] The post Blue and black, or white and gold? Three perspectives on ‘The Dress’ appeared first on PsyPost.
Do fruit flies have emotions? A fruit fly starts buzzing around food at a picnic, so you wave your hand over the insect and shoo it away. But when the insect flees the scene, is it doing so because it is actually afraid? Using fruit flies to study the basic components of emotion, a new Caltech study reports that a [...] The post Do fruit flies have emotions? appeared first on PsyPost.
Study finds those who believe in pure evil support more harsh criminal punishments Our belief in pure evil influences our feelings about capital punishment, finds a Kansas State University psychology study. Donald Saucier, associate professor of psychological sciences and 2015-2016 Coffman chair for distinguished teaching scholars, looked at how beliefs in pure evil influenced how people treated those who committed crimes. He recently completed the study with Russell [...] The post Study finds those who believe in pure evil support more harsh criminal punishments appeared first on PsyPost.