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Stable overall suicide rate among young children obscures racial differences The overall suicide rate among children ages 5 to 11 was stable during the 20 years from 1993 to 2012 but that obscures racial differences that show an increase in suicide among black children and a decrease among white children, according to an article published online by JAMA Pediatrics. Youth suicide is a major public health [...] The post Stable overall suicide rate among young children obscures racial differences appeared first on PsyPost.
Following the crowd: Brain scans show neural and social signals align The hottest hairstyle, the latest extreme sport, the newest viral stunt — trends happen for a reason and now scientists have a better understanding of why. In a study using functional magnetic resonance imaging, Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute scientists found that our inherent risk-taking preferences affect how we view and act on information from [...] The post Following the crowd: Brain scans show neural and social signals align appeared first on PsyPost.
Brain learning simulated via electronic replica memory Scientists are attempting to mimic the memory and learning functions of neurons found in the human brain. To do so, they investigated the electronic equivalent of the synapse, the bridge, making it possible for neurons to communicate with each other. Specifically, they rely on an electronic circuit simulating neural networks using memory resistors. Such devices, [...] The post Brain learning simulated via electronic replica memory appeared first on PsyPost.
What hundreds of biomolecules tell us about our nerve cells Researchers at the Luxembourg Centre for Systems Biomedicine (LCSB), of the University of Luxembourg, have, under Dr. Manuel Buttini, successfully measured metabolic profiles, or the metabolomes, of different brain regions, and their findings could help better understand neurodegenerative diseases. The metabolome represents all or at least a large part of the metabolites in a given [...] The post What hundreds of biomolecules tell us about our nerve cells appeared first on PsyPost.
Going my way? We think so, if we really want to get there Whether we’re buying a ticket to a movie, catching a train, or shopping for groceries, the more committed we are to achieving that goal, the more likely we are to assume others have exactly the same objective, a study by New York University psychology researcher Janet Ahn shows. The findings, which appear in the European [...] The post Going my way? We think so, if we really want to get there appeared first on PsyPost.
Study examines concussion, cognition, brain changes in retired NFL players A preliminary study of retired National Football League (NFL) players suggests that history of concussion with loss of consciousness may be a risk factor for increased brain atrophy in the area involved with memory storage and impaired memory performance later in life, according to an article published online by JAMA Neurology. While most individuals recover [...] The post Study examines concussion, cognition, brain changes in retired NFL players appeared first on PsyPost.
Small is Big Reality was nice to me today: rain washed my car, grass shined my shoes. Small is big....
Obesity may exacerbate inactivity, due to poor motor skills Obese adults have very poor motor skills which makes fine movements difficult for them, according to a new study. The findings suggest inactivity may not be a cause of obesity, but instead a result of poor motor skills associated with the condition. The work changes perceptions about inactivity in obese people as well as improving their quality of life.
Who Do You Know Who’s Afraid of Relationships? You? Last week’s cartoon was about how clutter in your home can make you feel guilty. For any cartoon you enjoy, you’re invited to share it anyplace except Pinterest. And thank … ...
Reject Yourself First (Before Everyone Else Does) For those of us prone to feelings of rejection, this is a common scenario. I’d rather consider myself a failure, unworthy, and feel rejected up front, before taking any social … ...
Finish Your Screenplay Now: Motivational Tricks Part 4 Continuing with this month’s focus on motivation for writers, (or anyone) here are some more clever tricks that can help you get back on track, or to feel more like … ...
Pinterest for Therapists Our website is on the first page of Google for some really awesome search terms. But, did you know we some days get MORE traffic and clicks coming from Pinterest than from Google? Our SEO is top notch- so why are we getting more traffic from … ...
9 Ways to Cope with Having a Mental Illness The world is pretty much in the Stone Age when it comes to psychiatry. This makes it hard for people with any degree of mental illness. It’s especially hard if you’re not quite able to function like other people but you do well enough so … ...
Nine Inspirational Quotes To Start Your Day   Difficulty is all around us. For some, it’s concentrated to one area of life — like a challenging job, or difficult relationship — and for others, it seems to … ...
How alcohol makes you friendlier – but only to certain people Drinking alcohol is associated with aggressive behaviour, accidents and ill health. Yet many of us choose to drink socially. This may reflect alcohol’s actions on specific brain circuits which make us feel euphoric and less anxious. Alcohol may also make us more empathic and cause us to see other people as more attractive. But why [...] The post How alcohol makes you friendlier – but only to certain people appeared first on PsyPost.
Gender equality: Why our ancestors were more egalitarian than us It is often believed that hierarchical and sometimes oppressive social structures like the patriarchy are somehow natural – a reflection of the law of the jungle. But the social structure of today’s hunter gatherers suggests that our ancestors were in fact highly egalitarian, even when it came to gender. Their secret? Not living with many [...] The post Gender equality: Why our ancestors were more egalitarian than us appeared first on PsyPost.
On a single day in 2011, Anders Breivik killed 77 people, most of them attendees at a youth camp org On a single day in 2011, Anders Breivik killed 77 people, most of them attendees at a youth camp organized by the Norwegian Labour Party. A thoughtful piece in the new New Yorker by Norwegian author Karl Ove Knausgaard takes a look at the mass murderer from the inside out, examining his mind and his motives....
Science shows kindness is contagious Research shows the natural high when being kind makes people want to behave more altruistically towards others.
Do you cry easily? You may be a ‘highly sensitive person’ Highly sensitive people, known as HSPs, respond more intensely to alarms, crowds and high-pressure situations, but they are more empathic and conscientious as well.
Reading People's Minds by Reading Their Lips No one can read minds, but you can come close by observing nonverbal gestures.