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Identifying your Emotional Lessons You may be suffering from the pain of internal pressure. You were not taught in school how to identify the presence of inner stress. You never learned where it came … ...
Women show persistent memory impairment after concussion Women may have a more difficult time than men in recovering from concussion, according to a new study. Concussion, also known as mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI), is a common medical problem affecting cognitive function and quality of life in some individuals.
How to stop songs from getting stuck in our heads? Chew some gum! An effective solution to get rid of earworms, those annoying tunes that keep on re-playing in never ending loops in our heads, has been found. The best way to block obsessive melodies is neither to read a good novel nor solve complex anagrams but, simply, to chew gum.
The Contradictions of Cliches What common clichés reveal about the popular psychology of our time.
Best of Our Blogs: April 28, 2015 “First, say to yourself, I’m totally independent of the good and bad opinions of others.’ Second: ‘I’m beneath no one.’ Third: ‘I’m fearless in the face of any and all challenges.'” – Deepak Chopra I tell myself the first statement often. As a sensitive person, I’m … ...
Finish Your Screenplay Now: Motivational Tricks: Part 1... As a screenwriting coach, I tell my clients their number one goal is to finish your screenplay. Don’t get bogged down going back to scenes you’ve already written and rewrite … ...
Will Jenner change things for transgender community? Bruce Jenner's confirmation that he is transgender makes him part of an embattled population that activists hope will benefit from a new high-profile member.
Study explains why your brain makes you snack Two separate teams of researchers have identified the brain systems that might motivate animals, including people, to eat even if they're not really hungry.
Adolescents’ drinking takes lasting toll on memory New research indicates that even moderate drinking by adolescents on a regular basis can cause potentially lasting changes to the part of the brain that affects memory.
The Most Important Thing To Know During Bipolar Episodes... Bipolar disorder is an incredibly complex condition. It can be approached from so many angles that you might specialize in any one of them. Unfortunately, most of the specialized approaches … ...
Bullying leads to depression and suicidal thoughts in teens High school students subjected to bullying and other forms of harassment are more likely to report being seriously depressed, consider suicide and carry weapons to school, according to findings from a trio of studies reported at the Pediatric Academic Societies meeting in San Diego. “Teens can be the victim of face-to-face bullying in school, electronic [...] The post Bullying leads to depression and suicidal thoughts in teens appeared first on PsyPost.
Hate to diet? It’s how we’re wired, thanks to hunger-sensitive cells in your brain If you’re finding it difficult to stick to a weight-loss diet, scientists at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute’s Janelia Research Campus say you can likely blame hunger-sensitive cells in your brain known as AGRP neurons. According to new experiments, these neurons are responsible for the unpleasant feelings of hunger that make snacking irresistible. The negative [...] The post Hate to diet? It’s how we’re wired, thanks to hunger-sensitive cells in your brain appeared first on PsyPost.
Neurons constantly rewrite their DNA Johns Hopkins scientists have discovered that neurons are risk takers: They use minor “DNA surgeries” to toggle their activity levels all day, every day. Since these activity levels are important in learning, memory and brain disorders, the researchers think their finding will shed light on a range of important questions. A summary of the study [...] The post Neurons constantly rewrite their DNA appeared first on PsyPost.
Family break-up linked to heightened risk of psychosomatic problems in teens Parental separation or divorce is linked to a heightened risk of psychosomatic problems among the children in the family, indicates research published online in the Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health. But joint custody seems to be less problematic than sole custody, the findings suggest. Over the past 20 years, family break-up has become more [...] The post Family break-up linked to heightened risk of psychosomatic problems in teens appeared first on PsyPost.
Ambiguous situations make it easier to justify ethical transgressions To maintain the idea that we are moral people, we tend to lie or cheat only to the extent that we can justify our transgressions. New research suggests that situational ambiguity is one such avenue for justification that helps us preserve our sparkling self-image. Findings from two related experiments show that people are apt to [...] The post Ambiguous situations make it easier to justify ethical transgressions appeared first on PsyPost.
Study finds cardiorespiratory fitness contributes to successful brain aging Cardiorespiratory fitness may positively impact the structure of white matter in the brains of older adults. These results suggest that exercise could be prescribed to lessen age-related declines in brain structure. The findings, which appear online in the Annals of Clinical and Translational Neurology, are the first to show a relationship between fitness and brain [...] The post Study finds cardiorespiratory fitness contributes to successful brain aging appeared first on PsyPost.
Study links insomnia to impaired work performance in night shift workers A new study of night shift workers suggests that overnight occupational and cognitive impairment is more strongly correlated to insomnia than it is to sleepiness. Results show that night shift workers classified as alert insomniacs had the highest level of impairment in work productivity and cognitive function, which was significantly worse than controls. This occupational [...] The post Study links insomnia to impaired work performance in night shift workers appeared first on PsyPost.
Researchers confirm that ‘chemo brain’ from cancer treatment is real UBC research shows that chemotherapy can lead to excessive mind wandering and an inability to concentrate. Dubbed ‘chemo-brain,’ the negative cognitive effects of the cancer treatment have long been suspected, but the UBC study is the first to explain why patients have difficulty paying attention. Breast cancer survivors were asked to complete a set of [...] The post Researchers confirm that ‘chemo brain’ from cancer treatment is real appeared first on PsyPost.
Scientists announce the neuronal positioning system: A GPS to navigate the brain In new research published today by Nature Methods, scientists from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem and Harvard University have announced a “Neuronal Positioning System” (NPS) that maps the circuitry of the brain, similar to how a Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver triangulates one’s location on the planet. For more than a century, neuroscientists have tried [...] The post Scientists announce the neuronal positioning system: A GPS to navigate the brain appeared first on PsyPost.
Heroin use spikes among whites who abuse prescription painkillers Researchers at Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health looked at the frequency of nonmedical prescription opioid use and the risk of heroin-related behaviors and found that past-year heroin use rose among individuals taking opioids like oxycontin and these increases varied by race and ethnicity. The most significant rise in heroin use was among Hispanics [...] The post Heroin use spikes among whites who abuse prescription painkillers appeared first on PsyPost.