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New Film Features a Borderline Woman Who Starts TV Show When Alice wins the Mega-Millions lottery in the new film "Welcome to Me," she quits her psychiatric meds and buys her own talk show hoping to be the next Oprah. The director of the film, Shira Piven, explains that the idea of the movie was to approach Alice (Kristen Wiig) as a real person and be respectful about the disorder.
New Film Features a Borderline Woman Who Starts a TV Show When Alice wins the Mega-Millions lottery in the new film "Welcome to Me," she quits her psychiatric meds and buys her own talk show hoping to be the next Oprah.
Ecstasy and language: MDMA changes how people talk about their significant others MDMA or “ecstasy” has well-documented empathogenic effects. The drug increases feelings of empathy and social connection. Now, research published in the Journal of Psychopharmacology has found that this increase in sociability is even reflected in the language of those under the influence of MDMA. “MDMA is thought to have prosocial effects that are unusual or [...] The post Ecstasy and language: MDMA changes how people talk about their significant others appeared first on PsyPost.
Toxic combination of air pollution and poverty lowers child IQ Children born to mothers experiencing economic hardship, who were also exposed during pregnancy to high levels of PAH (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons), scored significantly lower on IQ tests at age 5 compared with children born to mothers with greater economic security and less exposure to the pollutants. The findings by researchers at the Columbia Center for [...] The post Toxic combination of air pollution and poverty lowers child IQ appeared first on PsyPost.
Novel approach blocks amyloid production in Alzheimer’s mouse model Offering a potential early intervention for Alzheimer’s disease (AD), researchers at University of California, San Diego School of Medicine and Cenna Biosciences, Inc. have identified compounds that block the production of beta amyloid peptides in mice. The study is reported April 29 in PLOS ONE. If the results ultimately translate to human treatment, the most [...] The post Novel approach blocks amyloid production in Alzheimer’s mouse model appeared first on PsyPost.
Report: Brain-injured patients need therapies based on cognitive neuroscience Patients with traumatic brain injuries are not benefiting from recent advances in cognitive neuroscience research – and they should be, scientists report in a special issue of Current Opinion in Behavioral Sciences. Those who treat brain-injured patients rarely make use of new scientific discoveries about the workings of the brain. Instead, doctors, nurses and emergency [...] The post Report: Brain-injured patients need therapies based on cognitive neuroscience appeared first on PsyPost.
You Are What You Speak When bilinguals switch from one language to another, they shift their personalities as well.
I Am Not My Experiences: Letting Go of Negativity Angry someone cut you off in traffic? Envious that somebody didn’t invite you to their dinner party? Feeling low because someone refused your help? When you sink deeply into your negative experience, do you find yourself knowing nothing but your response in that moment — as if the rest … ...
The key to reducing pain in surgery may already be in your hand Imagine a hand-held electronic device – accessible, portable and nearly universal – that could reduce pain and discomfort for patients, and allow doctors the freedom to use less powerful and potentially risky medications to complement anesthesia. Now reach in your pocket, because chances are you already own one. According to new research from a team [...] The post The key to reducing pain in surgery may already be in your hand appeared first on PsyPost.
Giving to charity: Feeling love means doing more for distant strangers Marketers often use positive emotions such as hope, pride, love, and compassion interchangeably to encourage people to donate to charitable causes. But these distinct emotions can lead to different results, and love alone has the power to inspire giving to those with whom the giver has no connection, according to a new study in the [...] The post Giving to charity: Feeling love means doing more for distant strangers appeared first on PsyPost.
Parents describe arduous journey from diagnosis to pediatric epileptic surgery Having a child diagnosed with epilepsy can be a frightening and confusing time. Now, parents share their arduous and “circuitous” journey to get referrals for pediatric epilepsy surgery once their child’s disease stops responding to anti-seizure medications. The UCLA study sheds light on the difficulties parents face obtaining specialty and sub-specialty care for their children [...] The post Parents describe arduous journey from diagnosis to pediatric epileptic surgery appeared first on PsyPost.
Scientists uncover surprising new details of potential Alzheimer’s treatment Taking a new approach, scientists from the Florida campus of The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have uncovered some surprising details of a group of compounds that have shown significant potential in stimulating the growth of brain cells and memory restoration in animal models that mimic Alzheimer’s disease. The new study points to promising new directions [...] The post Scientists uncover surprising new details of potential Alzheimer’s treatment appeared first on PsyPost.
Laser Treatment for Sunspots Isn’t Just for Seniors Anymore...   Selfies are taking over the world. Even President Obama has been known to snap a selfie or two. People in recovery are no different. We want to display to … ...
The victimization quandry: To help victims we have to stop blaming them A woman is brutally assaulted, but rather than receiving the sympathy she deserves, she is blamed. If she had dressed differently or acted differently, or made wiser choices, others say, she would have been spared her ordeal. For victims, this “victim blaming” is profoundly hurtful, and can lead to secondary victimization. Psychologists have long realized [...] The post The victimization quandry: To help victims we have to stop blaming them appeared first on PsyPost.
Challenging work tasks may have an upside for the brain Professionals whose jobs require more speaking, developing strategies, conflict resolution and managerial tasks may experience better protection against memory and thinking decline in old age than their co-workers, according to a new study published in the April 29, 2015, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. “Our study is [...] The post Challenging work tasks may have an upside for the brain appeared first on PsyPost.
Evolutionary theory could help explain racism and other forms of prejudice Psychology, biology, and mathematics have come together to show that the occurrence of altruism and spite – helping or harming others at a cost to oneself – depends on similarity not just between two interacting individuals but also to the rest of their neighbours. According to this new model developed by researchers DB Krupp (Psychology) [...] The post Evolutionary theory could help explain racism and other forms of prejudice appeared first on PsyPost.
Why Women Put Themselves Down Women usually respond to compliments by putting themselves down. Research shows that the reason for this is not low self-esteem or self-hatred. Instead, it is something far more subtle, strategic...and powerful.
The 4 Essential Building Blocks to Being IN Love Partners in a troubled romantic relationship will often report that while they love their partner… they are no longer “IN” love with him or her. We believe the only difference between the … ...
Wife Swapping in the Stone Age Anthropologists are all too familiar with the violence and bloodshed triggered by marital infidelity. Now they are coming to terms with a more mysterious phenomenon – consensual wife sharing. If men fly into homicidal rages when their wife cheats on them, why would they encourage another man to sleep with her?
Brain circuitry for positive vs. negative memories discovered in mice Neuroscientists have discovered brain circuitry for encoding positive and negative learned associations in mice. After finding that two circuits showed opposite activity following fear and reward learning, the researchers proved that this divergent activity causes either avoidance or reward-driven behaviors. They used cutting-edge optical-genetic tools to pinpoint these mechanisms critical to survival, which are also implicated in mental illness.