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Martial arts may not provide mental health benefits to kids Though it might be great for fitness and self-defense, research suggests you should be skeptical of claims that martial arts provides measurable and consistent mental health benefits for kids. Marketing materials for martial arts studios often mention mental health benefits, and past research has found that Taekwondo can improve children’s prosocial behavior, classroom behavior, and mental [...] The post Martial arts may not provide mental health benefits to kids appeared first on PsyPost.
How to Deal with Depression Beyond the statistics that tell us depression is the most common mental illness in the western world, we know it is an illness that inhibits millions of people. It drains you of energy, sapping the light from your life and makes you feel isolated and alone. This week Colleen was asked by Australian Counselling to […]
Avoid These 3 Crucial Relationship Mistakes   Don’t let these mistakes change your relationship for the worse. Does this sound familiar? You’ve been together for a while now and have reached the “comfortable” stage in your relationship. You sometimes forget to shave your legs. He doesn’t call as often in the … ...
Alcohol Abuse and the Elderly: The Problem Continues to... Alcohol Abuse and the Elderly: The Problem Continues to Worsen It will come as no surprise that a considerable number of the older people in our nation drink. A drink … ...
My Cat Taught Me To Be Self-Reliant Smudge: My Cat Trained Himself To Use The Toilet… as a Water Bowl The Curious Cat Growing up I had CATS! I Love cats (yes, dogs too, but cats are … ...
Even when we're resting, our brains are preparing us to be social Our brains are wired to prepare us, during quiet moments, to be socially connected to other people, neuroscientists report. Facebook is aligned with the state of our brains at rest -- which can explain why it's such a popular activity when we want to take a break.
An alternative history of the human mind Nautilus has an excellent article on a theory of consciousness that is very likely wrong but so startlingly original it is widely admired: Julian Jaynes’ theory of the bicameral mind. Based on the fact that there is virtually no description of mental states in the Ancient Greek classic The Iliad, where the protagonists are largely […]
Two Reasons You May Not Feel You Deserve Happiness When all the psychological smoke is clear, there remain only a couple of reasons why many of us feel undeserving of happiness. 1. You’ve been treated poorly by others in … ...
Brain training induces lasting brain, mental health gains for veterans, civilians with brain injury In the first study of its kind, veterans and civilians with traumatic brain injury showed improved cognitive performance and psychological and neural health following strategy-based cognitive training. The study was conducted by an interdisciplinary team of cognitive neuroscientists, rehabilitation specialists, and neuroimaging experts.
How sleep helps us learn and memorize Sleep is important for long lasting memories, particularly during this exam season. New research suggests that sleeping triggers the synapses in our brain to both strengthen and weaken, which prompts the forgetting, strengthening or modification of our memories in a process known as long-term potentiation.
Scientists retrieve lost memories using optogenetics Researchers have found that memories that have been 'lost' as a result of amnesia can be recalled by activating brain cells with light. They reactivated memories that could not otherwise be retrieved, using a technology known as optogenetics.
Hallucinations And Delusions Are Surprisingly Common Ever heard a voice inside your head or saw something that wasn’t there? You’re not alone — and it doesn’t necessarily mean there’s something wrong with you. A study of more than 30,000 people from 18 countries found that about one in 20 of us have experienced a psychotic episode at least once....
The Many Ways Marriage Can Be Exhausting An exhausting marriage is not just about inadequate communication, insufficient funds or imperfect sex. While these items tend to be a factor at some level in every marriage, the exhaustion … ...
Brain circuit that controls decisions that induce high anxiety identified Some decisions arouse far more anxiety than others. Among the most anxiety-provoking are those that involve options with both positive and negative elements, such choosing to take a higher-paying job in a city far from family and friends, versus choosing to stay put with less pay.
The Type of Smile That Helps Start New Relationships People feel emotionally close to others displaying this type of smile. » Continue reading: The Type of Smile That Helps Start New Relationships » Read HealthiestBlog.com, the new site from PsyBlog's author Related articles:The Common Painkiller That Also Kills Pleasure How Our Emotions Work A Strange Depression Symptom That Most People Don’t Know Happiness is Contagious and Powerful on Social Media The Basic Emotion That Makes Infants Remember What They’ve Seen
What We Want to Remember I recently discovered a new-to-me blog by Karina Bania. This post in particular struck me. In it Bania wonders what she’ll remember about today: “Will it be the eight am … ...
Sleep quality influences cognitive performance of autistic, neurotypical children One night of poor sleep significantly decreases performance on intelligence tests in children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and also in neurotypical children (without ASD). The researchers observed the EEG measures of 13 autistic children and 13 neurotypical children (children with a mean age of 10 years old without an intellectual deficiency or sleep problem and who were not on medication) and found that disruptions in protective brain waves during sleep are associated with lower results on verbal IQ tests.
Researchers unravel a link between a genetic mutation and autistic behaviors, then find a way to undo it The mechanisms behind a genetic mutation that produces certain autistic behaviors in mice has been identified by researchers, as well as therapeutic strategies to restore normal behaviors.
Social Influence About Risk Differs for Teens and Adults Life is full of risky decisions. Some involve physical risks like crossing the street against the light. Others involve social risks like expressing an opinion that differs from those of peers. Still others involve financial risks like investing in the stock of a new company.
3 Eye-Opening Lessons for Rethinking Rejection Think about the last time you were rejected. Maybe it was by your boss or partner or even a stranger. Either way, it was probably painful. In fact, for many of us rejection is downright terrifying — so much so that we try to avoid … ...