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Auditory processing: Are expectations more important than sound? What affects how we hear? Do we hear sounds as they are, or do our expectations about what we are going to hear instantaneously shape the way sound is processed? These are questions that Bournemouth University’s (BU) Dr Emili Balaguer-Ballester and colleague Andre Rupp of Heidelberg University have been considering in their research into auditory [...] The post Auditory processing: Are expectations more important than sound? appeared first on PsyPost.
Researchers ID part of the brain for processing speech A team of New York University neuroscientists has identified a part of the brain exclusively devoted to processing speech. Its findings point to the superior temporal sulcus (STS), located in the temporal lobe, and help settle a long-standing debate about role-specific neurological functions. “We now know there is at least one part of the brain [...] The post Researchers ID part of the brain for processing speech appeared first on PsyPost.
A patient's budding cortex -- in a dish? Networking neurons thrive in 3-D human 'organoid' Scientists have perfected mini cultured 3-D structures that grow and function much like the outer mantle -- the key working tissue, or cortex -- of the brain of the person from whom they were derived. Strikingly, these 'organoids' buzz with neuronal network activity. Cells talk with each other in circuits, much as they do in our brains.
What’s the Key Imperative for Lasting Love? In the idyllic state of romantic love, you typically attempt to secure the object of your passion by putting their wants and needs ahead of your own. It’s as though you’re saying to yourself: “So I can make you mine, I’ll make fulfilling your desires more important than my own.” But that relational stance yet includes a crucial contingency clause. . . .
Our children's children's children* On top of old worries about whether humankind will survive the next few centuries come new concerns about whether our descendants will even be human in a sense that we would recognize. The centuries ahead could be very interesting, indeed.
Social work researchers create easier, accurate way to analyze TSCC trauma results A social work research team has proposed and tested an alternative method to using the Trauma Symptoms Checklist for Children in assessing trauma in children -- especially those in the juvenile justice system.
Alzheimer's culprit causes memory loss even before brain degeneration A brain protein believed to be a key component in the progress of dementia can cause memory loss in healthy brains even before physical signs of degeneration appear, according to new research.
Disaster Recovery Myths and Facts Because PTSD is a mental health diagnosis, we usually think of trauma as an individual condition. But traumatic events happen to communities all the time and recovery happens on a … ...
I Want Revenge: Finding Forgiveness Client: “If I forgive them, it will be as if I were condoning what they did.” Therapist: Don’t confuse forgiveness with excusing. To condone means to “let pass without punishment.” … ...
Plastic Surgery, Addictive? Who Would Have Thought It wasn’t that long ago that plastic surgery was used to repair birth defects or do an occasional nose job. Now, people, led by Hollywood’s example, are appearing to become … ...
Faith May Heal Depression But Don’t Stop Taking Your... At least once a month I get an email from someone who says she has read my blogs and she knows what I should do: Rely on Jesus and let my faith heal me. Now I know her heart is good and she speaks from … ...
What Your Brain Is Doing When You Think It’s Doing Nothing Solved? Long-standing mystery about what the brain is doing when it's doing nothing. » Continue reading: What Your Brain Is Doing When You Think It’s Doing Nothing » Read HealthiestBlog.com, the new site from PsyBlog's author Related articles:Debunked: ‘Right-Brain’ and ‘Left-Brain’ Personalities How the Brain Stores Memories Dementia: The Brain’s Weak Spot Found How The Brain Works During The Two Main Types of Meditation How Attention Works: The Brain’s Anti-Distraction System Discovered
Why We Care About Sports (Part II) – An Escape Previously, we resumed our discussion about why people watch sports and explained its simple entertainment value. This week we look at another factor listed as one among many in the … ...
Three Things I Learned From Failing   I shouldn’t have gone that day. I should have known that the article was going to come out in the paper that morning. I should have known that my … ...
What If You Don’t Like Being Single? Guest Post... Note from Bella: Sometimes I find that a topic I have been thinking about has already been addressed by someone else, in a particularly compelling way. That just happened with … ...
3 Powerful Ways to Turn Your Child’s Mistakes into... “Wow, she’s a natural at soccer.”  “He’s like a math prodigy!”  “Did you see how well she plays the violin? And she’s only five.” Growing up, I was in awe … ...
Defining “Normal” in Bipolar Disorder Feeling “normal” is not something that’s easy to describe with bipolar disorder. “What is normal?” is perhaps the most overused philosophical question, more a parody than actual soul searching. In … ...
ADHD Can Be Taxing Well, it’s that time of the year again. Your boss, your neighbours, your co-workers and the members of your social groups are receiving their income tax refunds. And you’re wondering … ...
Scientists use optogenetics to find ‘lost’ memories Memories that have been “lost” as a result of amnesia can be recalled by activating brain cells with light. In a paper published today in the journal Science, researchers at MIT reveal that they were able to reactivate memories that could not otherwise be retrieved, using a technology known as optogenetics. The finding answers a [...] The post Scientists use optogenetics to find ‘lost’ memories appeared first on PsyPost.
High levels of cynicism associated with lower income levels later in life, study says Holding cynical beliefs about others may have a negative effect on your income according to research published by the American Psychological Association. “While previous research has associated cynicism with detrimental outcomes across a wide range of spheres of life, including physical health, psychological well-being and marital adjustment, the present research has established an association between [...] The post High levels of cynicism associated with lower income levels later in life, study says appeared first on PsyPost.