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Why People Conform: Maybe It’s Not Social Pressure After All People move in herds -- but simpler forces are at work than social pressure. » Continue reading: Why People Conform: Maybe It’s Not Social Pressure After All » Read HealthiestBlog.com, the new site from PsyBlog's author Related articles:Social Conformity Effect Lasts Three Days How People Use Social Media to Manage Their Emotions Can This Simple Trick Stop Athletes Choking Under Pressure? Depressed People Take Social Rejection Harder, Here’s Why Rethinking The Stress Mindset: Can You Find The Upside of Pressure?
The Bananas of Slip, Lapse and Re-Lapse Prevention The essay below is adapted from Recovery Equation (Somov, Somova 2003-4) and is written up with a prospective client in mind.  You can also find a detailed application of this … ...
Rapid-cycling Bipolar Disorder When I was diagnosed as having bipolar disorder, I was termed “rapid-cycling.” Now, you must remember, at that time I really had no idea about the illness – depression=YES, bipolar … ...
Does the Subway Spread Crime? Most people probably don’t give much thought to the subway. You ride it every day to get into and back from work, and to move around the city to visit friends, grab a drink, or go shopping. Subways are clean, affordable transportation used by millions … ...
What Is The Fastest Way To Get Calm And Centered? Trying to figure out what is wrong For decades, whenever I would find myself in stressful family situations, I would try to figure out exactly why certain people pushed my … ...
When a Parent Is Incarcerated A two-step process developed by Dr. Glen Palm may help children cope with their parents' incarceration.
Menstrual cycle does not influence women’s political values: study Newly published research casts doubts on the link between women’s menstrual cycle and their political views, suggesting the association is “weaker or less reliable than previously thought.” Widely-reported research published 2013 in Psychological Science found that women’s menstrual cycle influenced their religious and political orientation differently depending on their relationship status. The two-part study by [...] The post Menstrual cycle does not influence women’s political values: study appeared first on PsyPost.
Psychopaths are better at appearing genuine when they pretend to be fearful or remorseful “The surface of the psychopath… shows up as equal to or better than normal and gives no hint at all of a disorder within. Nothing about him suggests oddness, inadequacy, or moral frailty,” psychiatrist Hervey M. Cleckley wrote in his 1941 seminal work, The Mask of Sanity. Psychopathy is a personality disorder characterized by impulsivity, [...] The post Psychopaths are better at appearing genuine when they pretend to be fearful or remorseful appeared first on PsyPost.
WATCH: Reducing prejudice through brain stimulation People show less prejudice after receiving low intensity electrical stimulation administered to the frontal part of the brain The post WATCH: Reducing prejudice through brain stimulation appeared first on PsyPost.
Study finds foreclosures fueled racial segregation in US Some 9 million American families lost their homes to foreclosure during the late 2000s housing bust, driving many to economic ruin and in search of new residences. Hardest hit were black, Latino, and racially integrated neighborhoods, according to a new Cornell University analysis of the crisis. Led by demographer Matthew Hall, researchers estimate racial segregation [...] The post Study finds foreclosures fueled racial segregation in US appeared first on PsyPost.
Eating Disorder Recovery: What an Imperfect Health Care System... Eight years in I knew I needed help for my eating disorder, but I was still trying to convince myself I’d get better on my own. I’d like to say I chose to go to the hospital because I had faith in recovery and made … ...
Note to Self, Note to All What a privilege it is to be alive, to be a part of this humbling and inspiring agony-ecstasy rhythm of existence!...
Is it human nature to want high standing in one’s social circle, profession, or society in general? Not everyone may care about having an impressive job title or a big, fancy house but all human beings desire a high level of social status, according to a newly published study. For decades, researchers have argued both sides of the question: is it human nature to want high standing in one’s social circle, profession, [...] The post Is it human nature to want high standing in one’s social circle, profession, or society in general? appeared first on PsyPost.
Viewing violent news on social media can cause trauma Viewing violent news events via social media can cause people to experience symptoms similar to post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). This is one of the findings by Dr Pam Ramsden from the Faculty of Social Sciences, University of Bradford that will be presented today, Thursday 7 May 2015, at the Annual Conference of the British Psychology [...] The post Viewing violent news on social media can cause trauma appeared first on PsyPost.
5 Things You Should Never Say When Someone’s Dog... Recently, my friend Stewart lost his pet dog named Charlie after a long battle with cancer. My buddy adopted his fur-baby from the humane society around 10-years ago and the … ...
Scientists have found a clear correlation between sleep problems and psychiatric problems in children Toddlers who take a long time to fall asleep or wake up many times during the night have put many a desperate mom and dad to the test. Tired parents are often told that night waking is part of toddlerhood, and that it will soon pass on its own, but this is not the case [...] The post Scientists have found a clear correlation between sleep problems and psychiatric problems in children appeared first on PsyPost.
Carrot or stick? Punishments may guide behavior more effectively than rewards When it comes to rewards and punishments, which is more effective — the carrot or the stick? A simple experiment devised at Washington University in St. Louis suggests that punishments are more likely to influence behavior than rewards. The results, which stem from a study involving 88 students at the university, are available online in [...] The post Carrot or stick? Punishments may guide behavior more effectively than rewards appeared first on PsyPost.
Comprehensive stroke centers may improve bleeding stroke survival People with brain bleeds are more likely to survive if they're treated at a comprehensive stroke center. Comprehensive stroke centers have the equipment and personnel to deal with the most severe strokes, including neurological critical care and 24-hour availability of neurosurgeons.
Local media helps communities to cope after traumatic events Local media’s sensitive approach to communities trying to cope in the face of trauma helps local people adapt to the stressful events by strengthening community bonds. This is one of the findings of a study by MSc student Suzanne Day from Lancaster University being presented today, Wednesday 6 May 2015, at the British Psychological Society [...] The post Local media helps communities to cope after traumatic events appeared first on PsyPost.
Self-deception Has Many Faces Procrastination is a stealth form of self-deception