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Researchers pinpoint epicenter of brain’s predictive ability In recent years, sci­en­tists have dis­cov­ered the human brain works on pre­dic­tions, con­trary to the pre­vi­ously accepted theory that it reacts to the sen­sa­tions it picks up from the out­side world. Experts say humans’ reac­tions are in fact the body adjusting to pre­dic­tions the brain is making based on the state of our body the [...] The post Researchers pinpoint epicenter of brain’s predictive ability appeared first on PsyPost.
Are you taking too much NyQuil? The surprising futility of drug labeling Any box or bottle of over-the-counter (OTC) medicine lists its active ingredients prominently on the label. But are consumers using that information to make wise choices about taking two or more OTC drugs at the same time? Probably not, suggests a new study in the Journal of Public Policy & Marketing. “A consumer who takes [...] The post Are you taking too much NyQuil? The surprising futility of drug labeling appeared first on PsyPost.
10 Seconds to Engineer Peak Performance (Be a PRO) Most people I meet would like to be calmer and more focused on what matters in the moments of their lives. But the more stressed we are, the less open … ...
Don’t overthink it: Trusting first impressions increases sales They say you never get a second chance to make a first impression. When it comes to selling, that might be a good thing, suggests a new study in the Journal of Marketing. “Salespeople can make accurate intuitive judgments of a customer’s needs, and those judgments can significantly increase sales,” write authors Zachary R. Hall [...] The post Don’t overthink it: Trusting first impressions increases sales appeared first on PsyPost.
The thin white line of future drug control The UK Government have announced they want to change the drugs law and ban “[any] substance which is capable of producing a psychoactive effect”. It’s a fairly predictable, clumsy attempt to tackle the wave of ‘legal highs’ but there’s a little psychopharmacological gem, hidden away, in the Home Secretary’s letter that accompanies the proposed changes. […]
5 Ways to Handle Jealousy in Relationships Disclaimer: This article is written from a male perspective. Rest assured, however, I understand that both men and women can display equal amounts of jealousy. Getting defensive only makes things … ...
Practice Makes Perfect: Help Cultivate Your Child’s Confidence... Practice makes perfect — or fairly close to. Knowing the “right” thing to say and do as parents is daunting. I’m guessing you don’t feel like a rock star parent 24/7. But what if I told you there is ONE word you can add to … ...
Is the Tongue the "Sword of a Woman?" The current evidence about sex differences in gossip indicates that beliefs about females being more likely to use gossip in an aggressive fashion are based upon more than just a stereotype. However, this does not mean that women are more aggressive or “nastier” than men; they simply differ in their preferred style of aggression.
Black athletes stereotyped negatively in media compared to white athletes Research has shown that media, such as television and video games, can affect viewers’ thoughts and actions. Now, new research by Cynthia Frisby, an associate professor of strategic communication in the University of Missouri School of Journalism, has revealed racial stereotyping in the way media portray athletes. Frisby found that media stories on African-American athletes [...] The post Black athletes stereotyped negatively in media compared to white athletes appeared first on PsyPost.
Compensatory rehabilitation limits motor recovery after stroke Relying on the better-functioning side of the body after a stroke can cause brain changes that hinder rehabilitation of the impaired side, according to an animal study. Strokes that occur in one brain hemisphere can result in poor motor function on the opposite side of the body, leading to heavy reliance on the “good” side. This study, found that such compensation produces structural brain changes at the site of the stroke in rats, limiting recovery of the injured side.
Kids’ altruism linked with better physiological regulation, less family wealth Children as young as 4 years old may reap better health from altruistic giving, a behavior that tends to be less common among kids from high-income families, according to new research on the nature and nurture of altruism published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science. “The findings provide us with [...] The post Kids’ altruism linked with better physiological regulation, less family wealth appeared first on PsyPost.
Study: Teens start misusing ADHD drugs and other stimulants earlier than you might think Despite stereotypes about college students resorting to black-market Ritalin to help them cram for exams, young people are actually most likely to start misusing prescription stimulant drugs in their high school years, according to new University of Michigan Medical School research. The peak ages for starting to use these drugs without a prescription – in [...] The post Study: Teens start misusing ADHD drugs and other stimulants earlier than you might think appeared first on PsyPost.
Social and sensory overstimulation drives autistic behaviors, animal study suggests A new study shows that social and sensory overstimulation drives autistic behaviors. The study, conducted on rats exposed to a known risk factor in humans, supports the unconventional view of the autistic brain as hyper-functional, and offers new hope with therapeutic emphasis on paced and non-surprising environments tailored to the individual's sensitivity.
Study finds why some colors appear more memorable than others Though people can distinguish among millions of colors, we have trouble remembering specific shades because our brains tend to store what we’ve seen as one of just a few basic hues, a Johns Hopkins University-led team discovered. In a new paper published in the Journal of Experimental Psychology: General, researchers led by cognitive psychologist Jonathan [...] The post Study finds why some colors appear more memorable than others appeared first on PsyPost.
Hidden costs of regulation: Emotional responses to command and control “No taxation without representation!” As we learned in American history class, restrictions to personal liberties often trigger strong emotional reactions instead of deliberate, rational economic responses. Just like the tea tax helping to spark the American Revolution, public policies today can have volatile, emotional reactions depending on how they are framed. In a new Cornell [...] The post Hidden costs of regulation: Emotional responses to command and control appeared first on PsyPost.
Why the ‘cool factor’ won’t lure college grads to your city A new nationwide study reveals that the kind of cities that attract college graduates has changed since the 1990s. In the 1990s, grads were moving to cities with fast-growing “smart” industries in fields like high tech, the study found. But since 2000, with a less vibrant national economy, college graduates are flocking toward the biggest [...] The post Why the ‘cool factor’ won’t lure college grads to your city appeared first on PsyPost.
The adolescent brain develops differently in bipolar disorder In adolescents with bipolar disorder, key areas of the brain that help regulate emotions develop differently, a new study by Yale School of Medicine researchers shows. In brain areas that regulate emotions, adolescents with bipolar disorder lose larger-than-anticipated volumes of gray matter, or neurons, and show no increase in white matter connections, which is a [...] The post The adolescent brain develops differently in bipolar disorder appeared first on PsyPost.
Brain's reaction to certain words could replace passwords You might not need to remember those complicated e-mail and bank account passwords for much longer. According to a new study, the way your brain responds to certain words could be used to replace passwords.
'Helicopter parenting' hurts kids regardless of love or support Researchers explored whether characteristics such as support and warmth might neutralize the negative effects of helicopter parenting.
Sometimes You Just Have to Cry it Out I am fond of the expression, “sometimes you have to laugh or you’ll cry,” and I use it a lot, often laughing at circumstances and myself. It seems though that … ...