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How anger is linked to your health Research shows that chronic anger is directly linked to an increased risk of heart disease and early death.
How Exhaustion Steals Joy Ginger wept when another woman said, “These are the happiest times of your life.” She desperately wanted to feel that way but as a new mother who worked a full-time … ...
Researchers isolate smallest unit of sleep to date Scientists have grown a tiny group of brain cells that can be induced to fall asleep, wake up and even show rebound sleep after 'staying up late.' The study -- the first to document that sleep originates in small neural networks -- opens the door to deeper understanding of the genetic, molecular and electrical aspects underlying sleep disorders.
Been there? Done that? If you are sure, thank your 'memory cells' The witness on the stand says he saw the accused at the scene of the crime. Is he sure? How sure? The jury’s verdict could hinge on that level of certainty. Many decisions we make every day are influenced by our memories and the confidence we have in them. But very little is known about how we decide whether we can trust a memory or not. Researchers have now identified a unique set of neurons in the medial temporal lobe, an area of the brain where memories and memory-based decisions are processed. They show that the activity of these neurons is indicative of the confidence by which a memory will be retrieved.
Decreased social anxiety among young adults who eat fermented foods A possible connection between fermented foods, which contain probiotics, and social anxiety symptoms, is the focus of recent study. The study is just the first in a series that the researchers have planned to continue exploring the mind-gut connection, including another examination of the data to see whether a correlation exists between fermented food intake and autism symptoms.
Relief of dystonia symptoms is sustained in pediatric patients undergoing deep brain stimulation Children and adolescents who received deep brain stimulation for generalized dystonia maintained significant symptom relief for up to eight years, according to a study. The results reinforce the observation that patients with a shorter duration of symptoms, and a younger age at implantation, experience better outcomes, researchers say.
The Wisdom of Failure: Don’t Save it for Graduation Speeches Our job is to not wait for graduation to talk about failure and success. It’s a little late then. Rather, we need to be rolling out the red carpet for our kids throughout their education. Making saying “I don’t know” or making mistakes safe. Making “I don’t know for sure” a noble and defendable position.
5 Ways to Make Exercise as Painless as Possible As a fitness writer and coach who has been training consistently for over a decade, I can confidently say that I don’t like exercising, and that’s okay. — Dick Talens … ...
Pets and Your Mental Health As I sit here, my dog is lying next to me chasing squirrels in his dreams. He’s my buddy and part of my family. Seeing his short face when I … ...
Best of Our Blogs: June 9, 2015 Have you been guilty of saying the following: 1) “Everything happens for a reason.” 2) “Time heals all wounds.” 3) “God gives us only what we can handle.” I’ve heard people use all three multiple times and for varied situations in my life. As for … ...
#153 Imagination as a Family Value Hartwig HKD via Compfight Values are hard to define and so it is not easy to figure out how to teach them to children. How do you define imagination? How … ...
One Size Does Not Fit All I am sure if you had the opportunity that you might ask me what my mental health regimen is – what medications in what dose I take, how often I … ...
Environmental factors account for the link between cannabis and psychosis A great deal of previous research has suggested a link between cannabis use and psychotic episodes. New research suggests that this association is due mostly to shared environmental factors rather than direct causation or shared genetic risk factors. In the first direct test of whether the link between cannabis use and psychosis is due more [...] The post Environmental factors account for the link between cannabis and psychosis appeared first on PsyPost.
Sorry, Emoji Doesn't Make You Dumber Far from emoji dragging us back to the dark ages, their advent has helped recalibrate our emotional intelligence: digital communication is catching up with the repertoire of communicative tools we have in the spoken medium. Emoji is an empowering addition to the hitherto, primarily, textual format in the digital arena.
Anti-rejection medications for transplant recipients protect against Alzheimer’s disease A new study from The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston has revealed that a treatment taken daily by people who have had organ transplants to prevent organ rejection protects against Alzheimer’s disease. An early online version of this paper detailing the findings has been published and is scheduled for publication in the July [...] The post Anti-rejection medications for transplant recipients protect against Alzheimer’s disease appeared first on PsyPost.
People at risk of hoarding disorder may have serious complaints about sleep A new study suggests that those at risk of hoarding disorder may have serious complaints about sleep. Results show that participants at risk of hoarding disorder scored significantly higher on the Sleep Habits Survey (SH) and on three sub-scales of the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), including sleep latency; sleep disturbances and daytime disturbances. “Hoarders [...] The post People at risk of hoarding disorder may have serious complaints about sleep appeared first on PsyPost.
Believing that you’re less biased than your peers has detrimental consequences It has been well established that people have a “bias blind spot,” meaning that they are less likely to detect bias in themselves than others. However, how blind we are to our own actual degree of bias, and how many of us think we are less biased than others have been less clear. Published in Management [...] The post Believing that you’re less biased than your peers has detrimental consequences appeared first on PsyPost.
Chimpanzees may know when they are right and move to prove it Chimpanzees are capable of metacognition, or thinking about one’s own thinking, and can adjust their behavior accordingly, researchers at Georgia State University, Agnes Scott College, Wofford College and the University at Buffalo, The State University of New York have discovered. Their findings, published June 6 in the journal Cognition, suggest chimpanzees share with humans the capacity [...] The post Chimpanzees may know when they are right and move to prove it appeared first on PsyPost.
Study of 38 countries links homophobia to HIV risk Gay and bisexual men living in European countries with strong attitudes and policies against homosexuality are far less likely to use HIV-prevention services, test for HIV, and discuss their sexuality with health providers, according to research led by Yale School of Public Health (YSPH). The study is published online in the journal AIDS. Attitudes about homosexuality [...] The post Study of 38 countries links homophobia to HIV risk appeared first on PsyPost.
New study shows boys will be boys — sex differences aren’t specific to autism There are more boys than girls diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Now, a study led by a University of Miami (UM) researcher shows that behaviors relevant to autism are more frequently observed in boys than in girls, whether they’re at risk of autism or not. “The results imply that there may be an overrepresentation [...] The post New study shows boys will be boys — sex differences aren’t specific to autism appeared first on PsyPost.