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Computer model shows how nerve cell connections form in visual cortex Researchers develop a computer model to explain how nerve cell connections form in the visual cortex. When newborn babies open their eyes for the first time, they already possess nerve cells specialized in particular stimuli in the visual cortex of their brains - but these nerve cells are not systematically linked with each other. How do neural networks that react in a particular way to particular features of a stimulus develop over the course of time?
Are You Overemotional Or Are You Just Being Manipulated?... How many times have you expressed a strong thought, feeling or desire at work and had someone marginalize you with a condescending statement, look or gesture indicating that you were … ...
The Link Between Weight and Bipolar Disorder If you’re like half the population of the United States, you’ve been worried about your weight at some point recently. That stands to reason as 39% of adults in the … ...
Older Americans Are More Prone to Substance Abuse In 1998, government officials warned of a dire trend that we’ve only recently began to take note of. It wasn’t an asteroid hurtling toward earth or the ever-growing impact of humans on the climate. It was elder substance abuse. In the late 1990s, the Substance … ...
3 Manifestations of ADHD Impulsiveness Impulsiveness is a large part of ADHD. In fact, it’s a big part of one of the subtypes. But you don’t have to have “ADHD, primarily hyperactive” to be intimately … ...
Emotional Attachment: 5 Unhealthy Relational Patterns What were your thoughts when you read this article title? You might believe that attachment has nothing to do with mental health but it most certainly does. In fact, some … ...
Women’s faces get redder at ovulation, but human eyes can’t pick up on it Previous studies have shown that men find female faces more attractive when the women are ovulating, but the visual clues that allow this are unclear. Now, new research investigating whether it might be to do with subtle changes in skin colour has shown that women’s faces do increase in redness during ovulation, but the levels [...] The post Women’s faces get redder at ovulation, but human eyes can’t pick up on it appeared first on PsyPost.
Is depression a mental or physical illness? Unravelling the inflammation hypothesis Most people feel down, tired and inactive when they’re injured or ill. This “sickness behaviour” is caused by the activation of the body’s immune response. It’s the brain’s way of conserving energy so the body can heal. This immune response can also occur in people with depression. This has prompted some researchers and clinicians to [...] The post Is depression a mental or physical illness? Unravelling the inflammation hypothesis appeared first on PsyPost.
For women with bipolar disorder, sleep quality affects mood Poor sleep is associated with negative mood in women with bipolar disorder, according to researchers at Penn State College of Medicine and University of Michigan Medical School. Bipolar disorder is a brain disorder that causes unusual shifts in mood, energy, activity levels and the ability to carry out day-to-day tasks. The condition is marked by [...] The post For women with bipolar disorder, sleep quality affects mood appeared first on PsyPost.
Bisexual men and women report poorer health than gays, lesbians and heterosexuals Bisexual males and females report poorer health than gays, lesbians and heterosexuals, according to a new study from sociologists at Rice University. “A New Piece of the Puzzle: Sexual Orientation, Gender and Physical Health Status” will appear in an upcoming edition of Demography. The study examined the self-rated health of 10,128 sexual minorities (gay, lesbian [...] The post Bisexual men and women report poorer health than gays, lesbians and heterosexuals appeared first on PsyPost.
Is marriage good or bad for your figure? It is generally assumed that marriage has a positive influence on health and life expectancy. But does this “marriage bonus” also apply to the health indicator of body weight? Researchers at the University of Basel and the Max Planck Institute for Human Development have investigated this question in cooperation with the market research institute GfK. [...] The post Is marriage good or bad for your figure? appeared first on PsyPost.
A By-Product Agoraphobia Joan Winifred: holding mop and bucket Chato Stewart: chewing PC monitor Joan Winifred: You just ordered it online! Can’t you wait till Tony’s pizzas get here? The essential feature of … ...
5 "Flaws" That Make You More Lovable You may think that people love you despite your flaws, not because of them. But some of the traits that you see as flaws may be more attractive than you realize.
Lego Therapy for Children with Autism Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder struggle with inappropriate or delayed social skills, fine motor skills, group skills, communication skills, attention skills, play skills, and more. Professionals from many fields are involved in the care of children with ASD including speech therapists, occupational therapists, mental health … ...
Fingerprinting our sense of smell: Scientists map humans’ olfactory receptors Each of us has, in our nose, about six million smell receptors of around four hundred different types. The distribution of these receptors varies from person to person – so much so that each person’s sense of smell may be unique. In research recently published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), [...] The post Fingerprinting our sense of smell: Scientists map humans’ olfactory receptors appeared first on PsyPost.
Omega-3 supplements and antioxidants may help with preclinical Alzheimer’s disease Here’s more evidence that fish oil supplementation and antioxidants might be beneficial for at least some people facing Alzheimer’s disease: A new report published in the July 2015 issue of The FASEB Journal describes the findings of a very small study in which people with mild clinical impairment, such as those in the very early [...] The post Omega-3 supplements and antioxidants may help with preclinical Alzheimer’s disease appeared first on PsyPost.
Study: The fear you experience playing video games is real — and you enjoy it With the advent of video games, a frequently asked question has been whether we get as engrossed in them emotionally as we do when we see a scary movie. The answer is yes and in new ways, according to new research by faculty in Indiana University’s Media School. And many game players enjoy the fear [...] The post Study: The fear you experience playing video games is real — and you enjoy it appeared first on PsyPost.
Is Facebook the next frontier for online learning? Social-networking sites such as Facebook can help students learn scientific literacy and other complex subjects that often receive short shrift in today’s time-strapped classrooms. In a first-of-its-kind study, Michigan State University’s Christine Greenhow found that high school and college students engaged in vigorous, intelligent debate about scientific issues in a voluntary Facebook forum. Such informal [...] The post Is Facebook the next frontier for online learning? appeared first on PsyPost.
Sleeping on the job? Actually, that’s a good thing Employees seeking to boost their productivity at work should take a nap–yes, sleeping on the job can be a good thing. A new University of Michigan study finds that taking a nap may be an effective strategy to counteract impulsive behavior and to boost tolerance for frustration. Napping, the researchers say, can be a cost-efficient [...] The post Sleeping on the job? Actually, that’s a good thing appeared first on PsyPost.
Study: Children from high conflict homes process emotion differently Children of parents who are frequently in conflict process emotion differently and may face more social challenges later in life compared with children from low conflict homes, according to the author of a new study published in the Journal of Family Psychology. The research study measured brain activity in children who were shown a mix [...] The post Study: Children from high conflict homes process emotion differently appeared first on PsyPost.