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From Bouncing Back to Springing Forward: How to Use... There is nothing wrong with bouncing back. That is, unless you want to move forward. If all you want to do is stay where you are, by all means bounce … ...
Snarky Answers to Common Questions About Mental Illness... Like many people living with mental illness, I get asked a lot of questions. Many of them are well thought out and lead to further education about mental illnesses and … ...
Are You the Real Thing? Coca Cola's brilliant "Share-a-Coke" advertising campaign has resurrected the flagging giant and refueled the debate over the toxic adverse health effects of soda and the vulnerability of the consuming public.
Shadow Deals At Work: Are You Setting Yourself Up? I just did a post on Shadow Deals In Relationships and got a big response. People, probably a lot of women, recognized that they do this stuff and it messes … ...
8 Psych Tips For Changing Yourself And Other People Part 1: Psych tips for how to promote change in yourself. » Continue reading: 8 Psych Tips For Changing Yourself And Other People » Read HealthiestBlog.com, the new site from PsyBlog's author Related articles:Really Easy New Method For Changing Habits How To Open Up People’s Minds to Change Can People’s Personalities Change? 6 Psych Tips For Creating The Ideal Workspace Here’s Why Believing People Can Change Is So Important in Life
Abuse and the Mirror of Love Everyone who loves another is susceptible to some form of emotional or verbal abuse, by virtue of the Mirror of Love.
How the brain learns to distinguish between what is important and what is not Traffic lights, neon-lit advertisements, a jungle of road signs: when learning to drive, it is often very difficult to distinguish between important and irrelevant information. How the brain learns the importance of certain images over others is being investigated by researchers. They show that learning the relevance of images considerably modifies neuronal networks in the brain. These changes might help our brain to process and classify the overload of stimuli in our environment more effectively.
Young People, Not Alone in Their Despair What is that cautionary tale? Things may not always – if ever – be as they seem.
18 Questions About Therapy You May be Wondering About,... 1. When is a good time to start therapy? Most people start therapy when they no longer feel in control or are able to cope on their own. It usually … ...
Sex and Love Addiction: Five Ways the Dominance Factor... Though dominance as a value may make sense on the battlefield, in love relationships, tactics of war are the problem. Dominance and hierarchical relations are guaranteed to produce needless suffering in the form … ...
What to Do When Someone Doesn’t Like You The other day a child psychologist was telling me about a very rigid, perfectionistic patient of hers. “I want to control what other people are thinking,” the patient explained. “How do you think you are going to do that?” the therapist responded. The 11 year-old … ...
A Recovering ADHD Paper Hoarder If you have ADHD, like I do, you probably are familiar with the dreaded stack of random papers. I have several around my house. … ah, who am I kidding, … ...
Five Ways for Teachers to Recharge This Summer To all the teachers out there, congratulations on finishing another year! The end of the school year is exciting, but the flip side of the coin is that it’s also very busy and stressful. Summer should be a time for you to decompress, revitalize, and prepare for an even better year ahead. To get off on the right foot this summer, check out Greater Good in Action (GGIA), our newly-launched online collection of research-based activities, or “practices,” designed to help you become a happier, healthier, and more compassionate person. Don’t know where to start? Here are five of our favorite ideas for teachers. (Click on each one to see more details about it on the GGIA website, including exactly how to do it and the evidence that it works.) 8 Essentials for Forgiving: Raise your hand if you have any residual “grrr” feelings from this past school year. We’ve all experienced times when a student, parent, or colleague treated us unfairly or said something hurtful, and sometimes it can be hard to let go of the bad feelings. But holding onto grudges, even small ones, only makes things worse for you. By helping you forgive, these steps can reduce your stress and make you feel better.  Gratitude Letter: Now, raise your other hand if there’s someone who really made a positive difference in your life this past year. It could be someone at school, someone who supported you from the sidelines, or anyone else who you never got to thank properly. Taking the time to write a note of gratitude to them—and even better, delivering it in person—won’t just make them feel great. It’ll make you happier, too! Awe Narrative: From making intense decisions to dealing with little details, it’s easy to get consumed by the day-to-day challenges of teaching. To break out of that tunnel-vision head space and expand your perspective (and maybe even remember why you became a teacher in the first place!), try thinking and writing about a time you felt awe. Believe it or not, doing this can make you feel like you have more free time and increase your life satisfaction.  Meaningful Photos: Want another way to boost your happiness and sense of meaning in life? It’s (almost) as easy as taking a selfie—but so much more fulfilling. Just take a picture or two each day of things that you feel make your life meaningful and then, at the end of a week, reflect on why those things mean so much to you. Now that you’re no longer stuck in a classroom for eight hours a day, get out there, get creative, and remind yourself of all the wonderful things that make your life worthwhile. Self-Compassionate Letter: Teachers, on the whole, are a pretty self-critical bunch. We dedicate our lives to caring for others, but we often don’t extend the same kindness to ourselves, instead beating ourselves up over every little thing. Thus, the idea of writing a letter to yourself expressing compassion for one of your own flaws or mistakes may seem strange, but it really works—it not only makes people feel better, but also makes them more motivated to improve. This would be a great way to set the stage for being kinder to yourself next year. Of course, these are only five of the dozens of practices on the GGIA website, so you should definitely take a look and see what else you find. If you try any of the practices, please feel free to leave ratings and comments—we would love your feedback, and other users will appreciate it as well. Best wishes for a happy, relaxing, and meaningful summer!
American Psychological Association's 123rd Annual Convention Aug. 6-9, 2015, Toronto Transgender issues, ADHD, bullying, violence, technology, PTSD among hundreds of presentations
Your First Therapy Session: 9 Important Questions To Ask... A first therapy session can be very intimidating for both therapist and client. But first sessions seem to be more  intimidating to clients because they are unfamiliar with the process, do … ...
Do insect societies share brain power? The cooperative or integrative aspects of insect colonies, such as information sharing among colony mates, can reduce the need for individual cognition in these societies, a new study suggests. Researchers compared social vs. solitary wasp species and found evidence that social brain evolution could dramatically different in insects than in vertebrates -- where complex societies require bigger brains.
Redrawing the brain's motor map Neuroscientists have refined a map showing which parts of the brain are activated during head rotation, resolving a decades-old puzzle. Their findings may help in the study of movement disorders affecting the head and neck.
Time spent near green places can improve childrens’ cognitive development The first warm weather here in the UK generally means a few things – the impending start of tennis at Wimbledon, school examination time, and the smell of cut grass. Inevitably, pupils and teachers start to wish they were outdoors and not stuck in a classroom. There is now a growing body of evidence why [...] The post Time spent near green places can improve childrens’ cognitive development appeared first on PsyPost.
Humanizing the “Mentally Ill” Want evidence to believe in the human spirit? Want to see how the world looks from the most stigmatized element of society? Check out Infinitely Polar Bear.
Eye's motion detection sensors identified Studying mice, scientists have identified a neural circuit in the retina that carries signals enabling the eye to detect movement. The finding could help in efforts to build artificial retinas for people who have suffered vision loss.