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Stronger working memory reduces sexual risk-taking in adolescents Teenagers vary substantially in their ability to control impulses and regulate their behavior. Adolescents who have difficulty with impulse control may be more prone to risky sexual behavior, with serious consequences such as sexually transmitted diseases and unintended pregnancies. A new study has found that individual differences in working memory can predict both early sexual [...] The post Stronger working memory reduces sexual risk-taking in adolescents appeared first on PsyPost.
Early life stress affects cognitive functioning in low-income children About a fifth of all U.S. children live in poverty. These children are more likely to experience learning and cognitive delays. Researchers have tried to determine causes for this disparity, with recent work identifying the hormone cortisol as a possible reason because of its ability to pass the blood-brain barrier. Cortisol is one of the [...] The post Early life stress affects cognitive functioning in low-income children appeared first on PsyPost.
Dietary trans fat linked to worse memory Higher consumption of dietary trans fatty acids (dTFA), commonly used in processed foods to improve taste, texture and durability, has been linked to worsened memory function in men 45 years old and younger, according to a University of California, San Diego School of Medicine study published online on June 17 in PLOS ONE. Researchers evaluated [...] The post Dietary trans fat linked to worse memory appeared first on PsyPost.
Individuals with social phobia have too much serotonin — not too little Previous studies have led researchers to believe that individuals with social anxiety disorder/ social phobia have too low levels of the neurotransmitter serotonin. A new study carried out at Uppsala University, however, shows that the situation is exactly the opposite. Individuals with social phobia make too much serotonin. The more serotonin they produce, the more [...] The post Individuals with social phobia have too much serotonin — not too little appeared first on PsyPost.
Recalling happier memories can reverse stress-induced depression MIT neuroscientists have shown that they can cure the symptoms of depression in mice by artificially reactivating happy memories that were formed before the onset of depression. The findings, described in the June 18 issue of Nature, offer a possible explanation for the success of psychotherapies in which depression patients are encouraged to recall pleasant [...] The post Recalling happier memories can reverse stress-induced depression appeared first on PsyPost.
What don’t you understand about yes and no? The words ‘yes’ and ‘no’ may seem like two of the easiest expressions to understand in any language, but their actual behavior and interpretation are surprisingly difficult to pin down. In a paper published earlier today in the scholarly journal Language, two linguists examine the workings of ‘yes’ and ‘no’ and show that understanding them [...] The post What don’t you understand about yes and no? appeared first on PsyPost.
Men get ahead by chatting before negotiations Whether sealed with a handshake, a million-dollar contract, or a string of curses, every business deal is a reflection of trust. Both parties trust that the other will hold up their end of the bargain. Good negotiators have a store of social capital before bargaining begins; built up through interactions outside the negotiations that establish [...] The post Men get ahead by chatting before negotiations appeared first on PsyPost.
A Letter To My Inner Child Dear Brian: I can see you. It’s nineteen seventy-four. You are thirteen years old in your bedroom. You are sitting a table playing with your baseball cards and putting stamps in the stamp book given to you by your brother Mark. So alone. Wanting to … ...
Pixar's Inside Out : Pixar Depicts Emotion: Inside Out Triumphs
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After the Storm Passes For some reason, I found myself in my feelings last night again. It seemed to just hit me all of a sudden. I have learned to expect moments such as these. They pop up and leave just as quickly as they arrive. In the past, … ...
Humans' built-in GPS is our 3-D sense of smell Like homing pigeons, humans have a nose for navigation because our brains are wired to convert smells into spatial information, according to new research.
Are You an Engineer of Emotional Walls or Bridges? Emotional Wall: Go AWAY! You Make Me Sick! Do No Enter Leave Me Alone I want to Die! You’re Ugly I don’t want you here I HATE YOU! Get away … ...
How to Turn an Argument Around: Three Keys to Success You know that point in an argument right before the blow up? Things are beginning to heat up, but you’re not past the point of no return. You could still … ...
Eye’s motion detection sensors identified Driving a car at 40 mph, you see a child dart into the street. You hit the brakes. Disaster averted. But how did your eyes detect that movement? It’s a question that has confounded scientists. Now, studying mice, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have an answer: A neural circuit in [...] The post Eye’s motion detection sensors identified appeared first on PsyPost.
Parents’ beliefs about their children make siblings different They grow up in the same home, eat the same food, share the same genes (and sometimes the same jeans), but somehow siblings are often no more similar than complete strangers. A new study from BYU found that parents’ beliefs about their children — and the comparisons they make — may cause differences to be [...] The post Parents’ beliefs about their children make siblings different appeared first on PsyPost.
Humans’ built-in GPS: Our brains are wired to convert smells into spatial information Like homing pigeons, humans have a nose for navigation because our brains are wired to convert smells into spatial information, new research from the University of California, Berkeley, shows. While humans may lack the scent-tracking sophistication of, say, a search-and-rescue dog, we can sniff our way, blindfolded, toward a location whose scent we’ve smelled only [...] The post Humans’ built-in GPS: Our brains are wired to convert smells into spatial information appeared first on PsyPost.
Use Rituals To Improve Your Relationship So much of relationship is about routine and safety. When two people know what to expect when they’re coming home to their parters, they feel safe and secure. Connection comes easier than … ...
Encounters with Dead Pets: A Study of the Evolution of Grief Bereaved pet owners sometimes think they have seen or heard their dead dogs or cats. Here's what these errors reveal about the evolutionary functions of grief.
Be Mindful of Music – Science Says It’s Good... When people think of mindfulness, they often think that it means “being present,” but everyone has a different idea of what you “should” be being present to. For example, I … ...