Article Description
Body fat can send signals to brain, affecting stress response The brain's effect on other parts of the body has been well established. Now, a group of researchers has found that it's a two-way street: Body fat can send a signal that affects the way the brain deals with stress and metabolism.
New insights into the circuitry of PTSD, mild traumatic brain injury Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and traumatic brain injury (TBI) can have devastating consequences. Both are associated with high rates of disability and suicide, and although they are separate conditions, they commonly co-occur. For example, a soldier who has developed PTSD as a result of a traumatic experience may have also sustained a brain injury during that experience.
Three Tricks to Help Find Your Sweet Spot When was the last time you were so focused that time stood still? Athletes call this mental state being in “The Zone”; psychologists call it “flow” or peak experience, and they have linked it to leading a life of happiness and purpose. Lao Tzu, the ancient Chinese philosopher who authored the Tao Te Ching, called it “doing without doing” or “trying without trying.” I think of this mental state as our “sweet spot,” where we have both great strength and great ease; it’s the mental state when our best work emerges without strain or anxiety. Instead of making our most powerful effort, we get to experience our own effortless power. Although we usually assume that a state of deep concentration is hard to achieve (and getting harder these days, as the interruptions from our smartphone/email/texts mount) the truth is that we can access this wonderful state much more easily than we often realize. Here’s how. 1. Clear mental clutter.What is going on in your mind that will keep you from your sweet spot? Take a quick look at your task list, and decide what you will do today and when you will do it. When our subconscious mind doesn’t know when we will complete a task, it will often interrupt our flow state with intrusive reminders about what else we need to do. Research shows that our unconscious isn’t actually nagging us to do the task at hand but rather to make a plan to get it done. So scheduling a task can make a huge difference in our ability to focus on something else. Another precursor to getting into The Zone is knowing where you are in your workflow. “That constant awareness of what is next is what keeps you focused,” Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi, professor of psychology and management at Claremont Graduate University and author of
The Bilingual Advantage: More Gray Matter in Key Brain Region Bilinguals have more gray matter in critical brain region, supporting their cognitive advantage. Related articles:Cooking Fish This Way Protects Brain From Gray Matter Loss With Age The Age At Which Learning a New Language Stops Strengthening The Brain Months Before They Start to Talk, Babies are Mentally Rehearsing Speech Schizophrenia, Depression and Addiction All Linked to Similar Loss of Brain Matter Meditation’s Widespread Effect on How The Brain Ages
The Art of Shouting Quietly: What Every Introvert Needs...     When you speak clearly, you don’t have to speak loudly. While this is something every introvert knows, it is not how we are told we should promote ourselves. … ...
Nature Calms the Mind—Even in Photos Brain research on why nature is calming and restorative.
Social climbing makes the English happier than Americans People who grew up in a working class family are more satisfied in later life than those from a higher class background according to new research. The study also found that English people who climb the social ladder are more content and happy when they get older than people in the States who are similarly upwardly mobile. The research sought to find out whether social mobility makes people happier in later life while taking into account people’s living conditions.
Raising Your Fee Could Make You a Better Therapist Contrary to the subtle and not-so-subtle messages you got in grad school, having people pay real money for the services you provide doesn’t make you an awful person. In fact, it may make you more effective. I recently raised my fee to $150 per session. … ...
Teen Addictions: From Warning Signs to Treatment Sam came into my office with fear in his eyes. His father had called me and stated he needed to find some help for his boy – all had not been right for a while. Sam was a freshman in college and had been doing … ...
Why People Drop Out of College: A Freudian Approach It’s no surprise to anyone that many people who start college do not end up completing it. The U.S. Department of Education claims that “as of 2012, only 59 percent of students on average received a bachelor’s degree within a six-year period. The numbers are … ...
Tackling a Heartbreaking Project For about 15 years I have had a wall dedicated to family pictures in the houses where I have lived. It includes photos of blood family and the kind of … ...
Does Your Prospective Boss's Personality Suit You? Compatibility with your prospective boss is the one factor that will likely have the most profound impact on job satisfaction, and maybe your career. Yet it’s remarkably neglected in the job interview. It's the elephant in the room that not enough job seekers dare to uncover. If you ask the right questions, however, you'll greatly increase your odds of success.
Job services lacking for young people with autism As autism becomes more prevalent, the need grows for services that help young people with the disorder to find and keep jobs, indicates new research led by Michigan State University education scholars. Some 50,000 people with autism spectrum disorder turn 18 years old every year in the United States, and these “transition youth” – shifting [...] The post Job services lacking for young people with autism appeared first on PsyPost.
Researchers identify the source of the debilitating memory loss in people with psychosis As disabling as its delusions and hallucinations, psychosis’ devastating toll on memory arises from dysfunction of frontal and temporal lobe regions in the brain that rob sufferers of the ability to make associative connections, a UC Davis study has found, pinpointing potential target areas for treatments to help the more than 3.2 million Americans for [...] The post Researchers identify the source of the debilitating memory loss in people with psychosis appeared first on PsyPost.
Musical tastes offer a window into how you think Do you like your jazz to be Norah Jones or Ornette Coleman, your classical music to be Bach or Stravinsky, or your rock to be Coldplay or Slayer? The answer could give an insight into the way you think, say researchers from the University of Cambridge. In a study published today in the journal PLOS [...] The post Musical tastes offer a window into how you think appeared first on PsyPost.
Having wealthy neighbors may skew beliefs about overall wealth distribution Wealthy people may be likely to oppose redistribution of wealth because they have biased information about how wealthy most people actually are, according to new research published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science. The findings indicate that people use their own neighborhoods and communities as a gauge of how much [...] The post Having wealthy neighbors may skew beliefs about overall wealth distribution appeared first on PsyPost.
Study examines how neurons in the brain remain electrically stable In biology, stability is important. From body temperature to blood pressure and sugar levels, our body ensures that these remain within reasonable limits and do not reach potentially damaging extremes. Neurons in the brain are no different and, in fact, have developed a number of ways to stabilise their electrical activity so as to avoid [...] The post Study examines how neurons in the brain remain electrically stable appeared first on PsyPost.
Schools with more minorities tend to punish students rather than seek psychological interventions Poor schools that have more black and minority students tend to punish students rather than seek medical or psychological interventions for them, according to a Penn State sociologist. “There’s been a real push toward school safety and there’s been a real push for schools to show they are being accountable,” said David Ramey, assistant professor [...] The post Schools with more minorities tend to punish students rather than seek psychological interventions appeared first on PsyPost.
Women’s sexual risk-taking when vacationing the focus of new study Relaxing beach vacations are perfect for sexual experimentation with a steady partner, while group tours and sightseeing trips are the ultimate contexts for casual sex with acquaintances or strangers, women said in a new survey. More than 850 U.S. women, ranging in age from 18 to 50, participated in the online survey, which asked about [...] The post Women’s sexual risk-taking when vacationing the focus of new study appeared first on PsyPost.
Coping by avoidance in making decisions for relatives in ICU may lead to PTSD Family members who make major medical decisions for relatives in an intensive care unit (ICU) may suffer posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) if they cope by avoiding the situation, according to a new study by scientists at Case Western Reserve University’s Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing. The patient isn’t the only one affected by the [...] The post Coping by avoidance in making decisions for relatives in ICU may lead to PTSD appeared first on PsyPost.