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Norepinephrine aids brain in sorting complex auditory signals The neuromodulator norepinephrine has an unexpected, direct action on auditory processing of complex signals, specifically bird songs in the zebra finch, new research suggests.
Why parrots are great vocal imitators Scientists have uncovered key structural differences in parrot brains that may help explain why this group of bird species can mimic speech and songs so well. These brain structures went unrecognized in studies published in the past 34 years. The results may lend insight into the neural mechanisms of human speech.
Curiosity: the top trait among those who succeed How the power of passionate curiosity---what Buddhists call "beginner's mind"---can help us thrive.
What I Would Like to Like, but Don’t Like There are lots of bands, books, shows, and movies that I unapologetically dislike. But then there are those I don’t like or dislike. I would like to like them, but I don’t. Is this category revealing of likes more honest and revealing?
7 Secrets to a Happy, Long-Term Relationship: How to... As time goes by in a relationship, the initial excitement of getting to know somebody, falling in love with them and feeling those butterflies in your stomach every time you … ...
Land of the Violent We are the home of the brave and the land of the free. We are also the land of the violent. Other countries do not understand why Americans are so … ...
Do Parts of How You Are Bother You or Others? Reactions driven by personality challenges are unconscious and automatic, like a reflex. You don’t think about it, it just happens . . . However, we can learn and develop the skills to respond to other people and situations intentionally with conscious awareness, rather than react on impulse.
Why the Mundane Matters We’re always looking forward to the next big thing in our lives, whether it’s a long-awaited trip abroad, graduating from college or getting a promotion at work. So it makes sense that when we set out to document our lives on paper, through photos or … ...
Naked Not Private: A Hypo Manic Thing I have no problem being naked, in fact, I feel freedom when I’m free from my clothes. Is that a symptom of chronic hypo mania? I just might be. Especially … ...
How our brains can form first impressions quickly A study of how people can quickly spot animals by sight is helping uncover the workings of the human brain. Researchers found that one of the first parts of the brain to process visual information -- the primary visual cortex -- can control this fast response, rather than more complex parts of the brain being required.
New Zealand blackcurrants good for the brain New Zealand blackcurrants are good for keeping us mentally young and agile, researchers report, a finding that could have potential in managing the mental decline associated with aging populations, or helping people with brain disorders such as Parkinson's disease or depression.
Low-field synchronized transcranial magnetic stimulation effective for major depressive disorder The results of a study assessing safety and efficacy of sTMS therapy with the NEST device in adult patients with Major Depressive Disorder have been published by researchers.
Why We Shouldn’t Reward Ourselves for Good Habits In large part, because the lesson is: be very wary of using rewards to master habits!
Atlas of older brains could help diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease A digital map of the aging brain could aid the diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease and other neurodegenerative disorders in older people, a study suggests. The atlas created using images from MRI scans of older people could aid diagnosis by comparing the patients' scans with a detailed map of the healthy aging brain.
Increased Anxiety Linked to Simple Behaviour You’re Probably Doing Right Now A behaviour you're probably doing right now has been consistently linked to anxiety. » Continue reading: Increased Anxiety Linked to Simple Behaviour You’re Probably Doing Right Now » Read HealthiestBlog.com, the new site from PsyBlog's author Related articles:Social Anxiety Linked To Surprise Chemical Imbalance In The Brain Anxiety’s Influence on Developing Alzheimer’s Disease This Blood Type Linked to Memory Loss Later in Life A Common Vitamin Deficiency Linked to Depression in Women High-Fat Diet May Disturb a Range of Thoughts And Feelings
“Crazy.” Hi. My name is Elaina J. and I am certifiably crazy. By definition on Dictionary.com – crazy means unusual; bizarre; singular. I don’t do drugs (well, without a prescription note), yet … ...
Inflaming the drive for suicide: Analysis reveals link between suicide, inflammation One American dies from suicide every 12.8 minutes, making suicide the tenth leading cause of death in the United States. There is consensus that if we could better predict who was at risk for suicide, then we could more effectively intervene to reduce this terrible burden on individuals, families and public health.
Tolerating Interruptions is Yoga Too Came across this sweet video and the following occurred to me: tolerating interruptions is yoga too.  When we feel thwarted, it’s not because Reality is somehow wrong, but because our … ...
Could 'virtual reality' treat alcoholism? A form of 'virtual-reality' therapy may help people with alcohol dependence reduce their craving for alcohol, a new study suggests. The findings come from a small study of just 10 patients. But researchers said they are optimistic about the potential for virtual reality as a therapy for alcohol use disorders.
How to Speak So You’re Taken Seriously Yolanda was disappointed. Once again, she had summoned up the courage to put forth an idea at a board meeting, yet nobody picked up on it. She wondered why her ideas were frequently pushed aside, both at home and at work. This happens much too … ...