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Embrace Disillusionment Disillusionment is a loss of illusion. A loss of illusion is a gain of truth. Seeing reality as it is, without illusion, is an important reality check that allows us … ...
Certain Foods Can Damage Your Ability To Think Flexibly Certain foods could damage the ability to think on your feet. » Continue reading: Certain Foods Can Damage Your Ability To Think Flexibly » Read HealthiestBlog.com, the new site from PsyBlog's author Related articles:The Diet Which Postpones Brain Aging 10 Most Addictive Foods: All But One Are Highly Processed High-Fat Diet May Disturb a Range of Thoughts And Feelings Dementia Treated Successfully With Anti-Aging Diet These Everyday Foods Have a Powerful Connection With Mental Wellbeing
What Do You Call a Talented Single Man Who... When Alex Rodriguez got his historic 3,000th hit – a home run! – the ball was caught by someone who is quite accomplished at snagging Major League baseballs, whether during … ...
Therapy affects the brain of people with Tourette Syndrome In addition to its effect on chronic tics, cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) can change the brain function of people with Tourette syndrome, new research confirms. Tourette syndrome is a neuropsychiatric disorder mainly characterized by motor and vocal tics in affected people. A tic is generally defined as a semi-voluntary movement or vocalization with no specific purpose.
Researchers question what happens in the brain when we think New research questions the prevailing doctrine on how the brain absorbs and processes information. The idea that the brain has a mechanism to maintain activity at the lowest possible level is incorrect.
How does the brain recognize faces from minimal information? Our brain recognizes objects within milliseconds, even if it only receives rudimentary visual information. Researchers believe that reliable and fast recognition works because the brain is constantly making predictions about objects in the field of view and is comparing these with incoming information. Only if mismatches occur in this process do higher areas of the brain have to be notified of the error in order to make active corrections to the predictions. Now scientists have confirmed this hypothesis.
Fructose produces less rewarding sensations in the brain Fructose not only results in a lower level of satiety, it also stimulates the reward system in the brain to a lesser degree than glucose. This may cause excessive consumption accompanied by effects that are a risk to health, report researchers. Various diseases have been attributed to industrial fructose in sugary drinks and ready meals.
Redrawing the language map of the brain For 140 years, scientists' understanding of language comprehension in the brain came from individuals with stroke. But now they have redrawn that brain map based on new research with individuals who have a rare form of dementia that affects language, Primary Progressive Aphasia. Scientists discovered language comprehension is in a different neighborhood, providing a more precise brain target for future therapies to restore language.
Authenticity: The Deep Hurt of Hiding Your True Self “If I was lying on my deathbed and I had kept this secret and never ever did anything about it, I would be lying there saying, ‘You just blew your entire life. You never dealt with yourself,’ and I don’t want that to happen.” – Caitlyn … ...
Why Mid-Life Crisis Happens A bad outcome of a mid-life crisis tosses people into counseling. They report that the person they knew became entirely different over night.  It is almost cliché that with a … ...
How Many Victims to Come, How Many Himizu's to Surface? Exploring the racism, psychopathy, and schizophrenia of Dylann Roof from a clinical psychology perspective.
3 Lessons about Psychological Well-Being from a Social Media... In the past few weeks I have been swept up in a social media tsunami. A photograph of me holding a baby while lecturing, taken without my knowledge in one of my lectures, went viral. For those knowledgeable about these things, apparently being number one … ...
A Surprising Influence on Your Emotions Recent research has found that group members actually become more similar in their expressions of anger and gratitude over time.
Norepinephrine aids brain in sorting complex auditory signals The neuromodulator norepinephrine has an unexpected, direct action on auditory processing of complex signals, specifically bird songs in the zebra finch, new research suggests.
Why parrots are great vocal imitators Scientists have uncovered key structural differences in parrot brains that may help explain why this group of bird species can mimic speech and songs so well. These brain structures went unrecognized in studies published in the past 34 years. The results may lend insight into the neural mechanisms of human speech.
Curiosity: the top trait among those who succeed How the power of passionate curiosity---what Buddhists call "beginner's mind"---can help us thrive.
What I Would Like to Like, but Don’t Like There are lots of bands, books, shows, and movies that I unapologetically dislike. But then there are those I don’t like or dislike. I would like to like them, but I don’t. Is this category revealing of likes more honest and revealing?
7 Secrets to a Happy, Long-Term Relationship: How to... As time goes by in a relationship, the initial excitement of getting to know somebody, falling in love with them and feeling those butterflies in your stomach every time you … ...
Land of the Violent We are the home of the brave and the land of the free. We are also the land of the violent. Other countries do not understand why Americans are so … ...
Do Parts of How You Are Bother You or Others? Reactions driven by personality challenges are unconscious and automatic, like a reflex. You don’t think about it, it just happens . . . However, we can learn and develop the skills to respond to other people and situations intentionally with conscious awareness, rather than react on impulse.