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5 Common Traits of Psychologically Healthy People How psychologically healthy are YOU? We all have a general idea of what we think a psychologically healthy person looks like. Maybe it’s not being depressed or anxious, not suffering, or not having a diagnosis. Maybe it’s being happy, or simply able to live a … ...
6 Questions for Recognizing ADHD A group of researchers have come up with a new version of the ADHD Self-Report Screening Scale, a short questionnaire designed to help people easily assess the possibility that they … ...
The Narcissist and the Speeding Ticket Once upon a time…in a kingdom far, far away…there lived a narcissist. Let’s call him Speedy, shall we? Well, one day Speedy got a speeding ticket. I’ll pause here for … ...
Stop Fighting Your Inner Critic with One Simple Strategy... Think about the last time you felt fear and anxiety take control of your day. Maybe it stopped you from making an important contribution in a meeting because you felt like your opinion wasn’t worthwhile. Or maybe a simple email took you hours to write … ...
How Often Do Bipolar Disorder or Depression Meet ADHD? The vast majority of people with bipolar disorder and about 35% of those with major depressive disorder have at least one other psychiatric illness. Some of these illnesses include anxiety … ...
This Vitamin May Help Treat Autism Autism research finds link between this vitamin and serotonin production. • Click here for your free sample of Dr Jeremy Dean's latest ebook The Anxiety Plan: 42 Strategies For Worry, Phobias, OCD and Panic • Dr Dean is also the author of Spark: 17 Steps That Will Boost Your Motivation For Anything.
Transcription factor expression tied to medial amygdala neuronal ID, sex-specific response Neurons derived from two different types of precursor cells that later develop into neurons in the medial amygdala -- one of the interconnected structures in the brain involved in emotion, motivation and memory -- help to program innate reproductive and aggressive behaviors into the brain, research indicates.
Fear Will Not Keep You Sober Many addicts do not think about strategies for preventing a relapse in the early days of recovery. This is because they are so close to the pain of their last … ...
Measuring Smarts Feedback learning ability might predict academic achievement better than IQ.
Busy Mind, Busy Place I’m off on an adventure this weekend. I’ve returned to the city of my birth. Well, I’ve returned to the city that gobbled up the town of my birth, but … ...
DSM-5: A Hopeful Future? I currently work as an assistant psychologist within a Child and Adolescent Mental Health Service, on a diagnostic pathway. My work primarily involves assessing children for developmental disorders. In terms of academia, I studied psychology at BSc level and clinical psychology at MSc level. It … ...
Adult Children of Alcoholics and the Need to Feel... Feeling out of control is scary for most people, but even more so for adult children of alcoholics (ACOAs). Living with an alcoholic or addict is scary and unpredictable, especially … ...
Today I Love Having A Home Today I love having a home, even though it isn’t technically my house, it is absolutely my home and I am welcome and sheltered there. I love that my biggest … ...
Deep brain stimulation decreases tics in young adults with severe Tourette syndrome A surgical procedure called deep brain stimulation that sends electrical impulses to a specific area of the brain reduces the 'tics,' or involuntary movements and vocal outbursts, experienced by young adults with severe cases of Tourette syndrome.
Peptide acts as mediator for learning In order to adapt to changes in the environment, the brain produces new nerve cells even at adult age. These young neurons are crucial for memory formation and learning. Scientists have now discovered that a small peptide plays the role of a mediator in this process. In response to an external stimulus such as a varied environment, the mediator peptide boosts the proliferation of neural stem cells and neural progenitor cells.
Feeling Blah? This Might Be Why Some days, maybe most days lately, you’ve been feeling blah. Maybe you’re going through the motions. You aren’t particularly excited about your day. Maybe you’re frustrated or lethargic. Maybe you’re feeling disconnected. Maybe you’re moving about your days like a zombie. Maybe you find yourself … ...
Is the Life I Am Living “Good Enough?” Oh boy oh boy. A dear Facebook friend just sent me this awesome article. The gist of the post is simply this: what if I don’t want to make an … ...
Why Passive Aggressive Behavior Thrives in the Workplace Passive aggressive workers make for an unpleasant office atmosphere at best and utter sabotage of productivity at worst.
The Effects of Weight Teasing For children, the mental health consequences of being teased about their weight may be more significant than the consequences of simply being overweight – that’s according to a new study from researchers in Germany. The study surveyed over a thousand children between the ages of 7 and 11 over the...
Four Ways to Make Gossip Less Toxic Gossip gets a bad rap. There’s no doubt that the act of gossiping about someone can sometimes be damaging and negative. But there is such a thing as “good gossip,” and the very act of gossiping can actually help the way we interact with each other. If we follow some simple steps, we can take part in gossip without it ending in tears. Gossip is defined as talking about and evaluating someone when they aren’t there. But we can use gossip to learn about the rules of behavior in social groups and get closer to each other. It helps us do this by letting us learn important information without the need to actually talk to every group member. So gossiping is efficient, and those who gossip can use this social currency to gain positions of power. But being a gossip also has a dark side. Gossips are generally viewed as unlikeable, untrustworthy, and weak. Even children as young as nine regard those who spread information about other people as less likeable and less deserving of rewards. There is also evidence that gossiping may make us feel bad about ourselves, regardless of whether what we have said is nasty or nice. And, of course, there are the consequences for the person you have gossiped about, who may suffer psychologically if they find out they were the target of gossip. 1. Keep it secret There are clear negative consequences if you learn that you have been the target of gossip. Those who know they have been gossiped about at work, for example, experience less physical and psychological well-being. When we learn about social rules through gossip, we are learning about what rules we should follow, but also about what actions we should avoid if we want to be a valued member of our group. The advantage of learning about group transgressions in this way is that we do not have to have an awkward confrontation with the person who has transgressed. If we want gossip to oil the wheels of social interaction, but not cause conflict and upset, we need to be discrete. 2. Make it useful Although there is plenty of evidence that we dislike those who gossip frequently, this depends on the perceived motive of the gossiper. If the listener feels that you are attempting to help the group when you share the gossip, they can be much more forgiving. For example, in a study where a gossiper shared information about a cheating student, they were only disliked when they were sharing this information for selfish reasons. When they expressed the gossip in a way which focused on fairness for the whole student group, it was the cheater who was disliked, not the gossiper. Ensuring that gossip is useful can also help to alleviate the negative feelings gossipers have when they share gossip. In a study where a participant saw another person cheating, it made the participant uncomfortable knowing about the cheat. But they felt better when they were able to warn the other participants about the cheat’s bad behavior. 3. Do not tell lies Gossip which is not true does not offer the same social learning benefits as that which is true. False gossip risks conflict and upset to the target of gossip but this action is not justified by benefits to the group, so the gossiper may feel worse about spreading information they know to be false that they usually would when communicating gossip. The gossiper also risks being “found out” by their listeners. People can employ sophisticated strategies—including comparing the information they gain to existing knowledge—to protect themselves from being influenced by malicious gossip. 4. Connect with your listener Effective gossip is not just about what you say, or about whom. It is also about how you say it. Of course, you can make the benefits of the gossip clear to your listener by clearly explaining why you have shared the information. But sharing particularly emotional reactions to the information may help you to connect with your listener and avoid negative reactions. When we share emotional reactions to others with someone, they feel closer to us, especially when they agree with the reaction we share. Sharing how you feel may encourage the listener to react more favorably to your gossiping behavior. So the next time you need to share some gossip, stop and ask yourself whether the information will stay secret from the person you’re talking about and whether it is useful. And do not be afraid to share your emotions with your listener. This way you can hopefully engage in “good gossip” and reap the social rewards that come with it. This article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.