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School shootings, mass killings are 'contagious,' study finds A new study finds that mass killings spread contagiously and the window for copycat killings lasts about 13 days.
It’s Not My Fault (or is it?) Recently a dear friend re-posted an interesting blog piece by Dr. Kelly Flanagan called “The Fault in Our Scars.” I read it and immediately felt a strong irritation arise from … ...
Health information causing new moms anxiety Pregnancy and motherhood are both wonderful and worrisome times -- could public health campaigns and social stereotypes be contributing to anxiety for mothers? Researchers suggest that perinatal anxiety disorders are common but much less attention has been paid to anxiety than depression.
Intrusiveness of old emotional memories can be reduced by computer game play procedure Unwanted, intrusive visual memories are a core feature of stress- and trauma-related clinical disorders such as posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), but they can also crop up in everyday life. New research shows that even once intrusive memories have been laid down, playing a visually-demanding computer game after reactivating the memories may reduce their occurrence over time.
Restoring Trust In Recovery April 7th 2007.  Sunday morning. My girl friend had moved-in with me two weeks before. She had gone away for the weekend to visit family.  We had been dating for just over one year.  I had been very successful to that point in hiding everything … ...
How the human brain might reconstruct past events When remembering something from our past, we often vividly re-experience the whole episode in which it occurred. New research has now revealed how this might happen in the brain. The study shows that when someone tries to remember one aspect of an event, such as who they met yesterday, the representation of the entire event can be reactivated in the brain, including incidental information such as where they were and what they did.
The Power of Therapy as Told in Stories Unless you’ve been to therapy, you probably don’t know how it works. Do you really lie on a couch and talk about your problems the whole time? Does the therapist just listen? Do they offer advice? Will they judge you? What kinds of questions do … ...
Seeing is believing: How brains make sense of the visual world If your eyes deceive you, blame your brain. Many optical illusions work because what we see clashes with what we expect to see. That 3D movie? Give credit to filmmakers who exploit binocular vision, or the way the brain merges the slightly different images from the two eyes to create depth. These are examples of [...] The post Seeing is believing: How brains make sense of the visual world appeared first on PsyPost.
It’s Okay to be a Little Crazy Sometimes I’ve been a little nutty this week. (If you find offense to that statement please quit reading). First of all there was the “top of the head coming off” nonsense. … ...
Boys more likely to have antipsychotics prescribed, regardless of age Boys are more likely than girls to receive a prescription for antipsychotic medication regardless of age, researchers have found. Approximately 1.5 percent of boys ages 10-18 received an antipsychotic prescription in 2010, although the percentage falls by nearly half after age 19. Among antipsychotic users with mental disorder diagnoses, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) was [...] The post Boys more likely to have antipsychotics prescribed, regardless of age appeared first on PsyPost.
Fine tuning in the brain: Study examines how neural networks develop When newborn babies open their eyes for the first time, they already possess nerve cells specialized in particular stimuli in the visual cortex of their brains – but these nerve cells are not systematically linked with each other. How do neural networks that react in a particular way to particular features of a stimulus develop [...] The post Fine tuning in the brain: Study examines how neural networks develop appeared first on PsyPost.
How cortisol reinforces traumatic memories The stress hormone cortisol strengthens memories of scary experiences. However, it is effective not only while the memory is being formed for the first time, but also later when people look back at an experience while the memory reconsolidates. This has been published by cognition psychologists from the Ruhr-Universität Bochum in the journal Neuropsychopharmacology. They [...] The post How cortisol reinforces traumatic memories appeared first on PsyPost.
Doing good deeds helps socially anxious people relax Being busy with acts of kindness can help people who suffer from social anxiety to mingle more easily. This is the opinion of Canadian researchers Jennifer Trew of Simon Fraser University and Lynn Alden of the University of British Columbia, in a study published in Springer’s journal Motivation and Emotion. Sufferers from social anxiety are [...] The post Doing good deeds helps socially anxious people relax appeared first on PsyPost.
Men with ‘low testosterone’ have higher rates of depression Researchers at the George Washington University (GW), led by Michael S. Irwig, M.D., found that men referred for tertiary care for borderline testosterone levels had much higher rates of depression and depressive symptoms than those of the general population. “In an era where more and more men are being tested for “Low T” — or [...] The post Men with ‘low testosterone’ have higher rates of depression appeared first on PsyPost.
New epigenetic mechanism revealed in brain cells For decades, researchers in the genetics field have theorized that the protein spools around which DNA is wound, histones, remain constant in the brain, never changing after development in the womb. Now, researchers from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai have discovered that histones are steadily replaced in brain cells throughout life – [...] The post New epigenetic mechanism revealed in brain cells appeared first on PsyPost.
Preemies at high risk of autism don’t show typical signs of disorder in early infancy Premature babies are at an increased risk for developing autism spectrum disorder. But a small study indicates that preemies who avoid eye contact in early infancy are less likely to demonstrate symptoms of autism at age 2 than preemies who maintain eye contact during early interactions, according to new research at Washington University School of [...] The post Preemies at high risk of autism don’t show typical signs of disorder in early infancy appeared first on PsyPost.
How evolutionary psychology may explain the difference between male and female serial killers Researchers such as psychologist Marvin Zuckerman have long noted the morbid curiosity of humans; there’s just something about horror and terror that captures our attention. Indeed, there may be nothing more horrifying – and fascinating – than murder. With my colleague Tom Bowers at Penn State Harrisburg, I’ve studied the crimes and characteristics of mass [...] The post How evolutionary psychology may explain the difference between male and female serial killers appeared first on PsyPost.
The Harsh Reality of Raising a Teen Addict I can never protect him from the real threat — the threat of an addictive brain. After more than 24 hours of labor, I’m exhausted and barely awake; yet, I recognize the baby screaming from the nursery as my own. I’m a mom. The nurses … ...
Short-term meditation linked to increased blood flow in the brain, increased attention, and better self-regulation A recently released study has shown that a form of meditation called integrative body-mind training (IBMT) can produces significant changes in the brain after only a few hours of practice.  The researchers released their findings in a February 2015 edition of Frontiers in Psychology.  These promising results show that this form of meditation may help [...] The post Short-term meditation linked to increased blood flow in the brain, increased attention, and better self-regulation appeared first on PsyPost.
Study analyzes which shared traits attract us to new people Past studies have shown that people will react more positively to people who are similar to them. People who perceive similarities are more likely to speak with someone they think is similar to them, have and maintain closer relationships with people who are similar, and are more altruistic towards friends with which they have more [...] The post Study analyzes which shared traits attract us to new people appeared first on PsyPost.