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The Anxious Cycle: How Children Inherit Our Anxiety As a victim of childhood trauma, I have a propensity toward anxiety. It is my reaction of choice when life gets difficult. Having lived with anxiety most of my life, I never knew there was another way to live. I assumed it was normal. I … ...
5 Science-Based Practices for Daily Happiness Most people I’ve met, if not all, would try like to be happy. There are all kinds of books on happiness, courses on happiness, and documentaries on happiness. So why … ...
21 Ways to Beat Exhaustion Are your clients exhausted from doing too many things at once? Some research suggests that multi-tasking is impossible — when done, a person is actually giving only partial attention to many things. With all the advances in technology, it seems that life doesn’t stop long … ...
People walk slower and swerve when texting while distracted Texting while walking and being cognitively distracted may significantly affect the way a person walks, resulting in a more cautious gait, according to a study published July 29, 2015 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE led by Dr. Conrad Earnest of Texas A&M University and colleagues from the University of Bath, UK. Walkers regularly text [...] The post People walk slower and swerve when texting while distracted appeared first on PsyPost.
Study shows how social groups are represented in the brain Politicians, children, teachers, Europeans… what do they have in common? As discovered in a study led by Luca Piretti and his colleagues from SISSA (International School for Advanced Studies) of Trieste, they are all social groups, a special semantic category for the human brain that is closely linked with emotions. Until recently, most neuroscientists believed [...] The post Study shows how social groups are represented in the brain appeared first on PsyPost.
Hunting Bwana the Dentist What would motivate a dentist to spend $55,000 to kill an elderly tourist lion? The answer takes us on a psychological safari looking at recent themes in American life that incite and reward fantasies of the mighty hunter.
Early prosocial behavior a significant predictor of kids’ future Kindergarteners’ social-emotional skills are a significant predictor of their future education, employment and criminal activity, among other outcomes, according to Penn State researchers. In a study spanning nearly 20 years, kindergarten teachers were surveyed on their students’ social competence. Once the kindergarteners reached their 20s, researchers followed up to see how the students were faring, [...] The post Early prosocial behavior a significant predictor of kids’ future appeared first on PsyPost.
Trauma: How to Help Firefighters and Police In the previous post we started talking with Elizabeth Barney about trauma in first responders, like police, paramedics and firefighters.  Today we continue with a discussion about trauma treatment. Q: There … ...
Cecil – Neural Tribe Perspective By now we’ve all seen the captions: “An American dentist kills Cecil the Lion.”  The relevant facts are: a man pays $55k for the right to kill a lion; his … ...
Sex & Depression: Just Add Fifty Shades of Grey I’m reading Fifty Shades of Grey. It’s come to that. I’m not very far, just at the elevator scene when they finally kiss. It’s the safest, cheapest, easiest solution so far that I’ve found to my problem: a libido that exists somewhere on the back … ...
Couples who Quibble and How to Stop Do couples who argue a lot realize how unproductive they are being and how much damage they are doing? The clients I work with are pretty self-aware people, so when … ...
You May Not Persist Long Enough in Creative Tasks I have the opportunity to work with groups who are trying to develop creative solutions to problems. One thing I have noticed is that groups often try to end the task of generating new potential solutions fairly quickly. After they have generated a couple of good ideas, they want to move on to evaluating those ideas and planning a way to execute those ideas.
Three Surprising Things You Didn’t Know About Self-Control...   Self-control is the capacity to override one’s impulses and automatic habitual responses, and it seems vital for almost everything we do.   The conscious and effortful form of self-regulation … ...
Can Artificial Intelligence Make Us Stupid? Changing technology stimulates the brain and increases intelligence. But that may only be true if the technology challenges us. In a world run by intelligent machines, our lives could get a lot simpler. Would that make us less intelligent?
22% of Children Have Underdeveloped Brains From This Social Circumstance How parents can offset these damaging effects on their children. Related articles:The Most Common Mental Health Problem is ‘Contagious’ Spanking Children Promotes Antisocial Behaviour and Slows Mental Development How Parents Turn Their Children Into Narcissists This Early Parental Behaviour Predicts A Child’s Academic and Social Skills 3 Decades Later How Children Inherit Anxiety And Depression From Their Parents
Brain surgery saved Russian general who helped defeat Napoleon: Scientists 'rewrite' history books After more than two-years of international investigation, scientists have concluded that Napoleon likely would have conquered Russia in 1812 if not for the life-saving brain surgery performed on Russian general Mikhail Kutuzov by the French surgeon Jean Massot, who operated on Kutuzov after bullets twice passed through his head.
Compliance with guidelines for treating brain injuries doesn't guarantee better outcomes Two decades ago, the Brain Trauma Foundation published its first set of guidelines for treating traumatic brain injury. Now, a study has found no evidence that compliance with the guidelines led to lower mortality rates.
Spreading Misinformation About ADHD John Rosemond, MS is a nationally-syndicated columnist and parenting expert who’s made a name for himself by promoting a lot of old-fashioned parenting skills. You know, like spanking. I suppose there’s nothing wrong with ignoring research data and science that’s been published in the past … ...
Naturally occurring protein fragment found in the brain inhibits key enzyme implicated in Alzheimer's disease A natural protein fragment produced in the brain can act as an inhibitor of a key enzyme implicated in the onset of Alzheimer's disease, researchers have discovered for the first time. This is a finding that could lead to the development of new drugs to treat the disease, they say.
Key factor for stability of capillaries in brain identified The brain needs a lot of oxygen – so every last corner of the brain’s tissue is served by a dense network of fine blood vessels. When these capillaries are damaged by high blood pressure or age, doctors call the condition cerebral small vessel disease. They estimate this is the cause of around one in five strokes, and that the condition may also lead to certain forms of dementia.