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High fat diet changes gut microbe populations and brain's ability to recognize fullness Have you ever wondered why eating one good-tasting French fry may lead you to eat the whole batch and leave you wanting more?
Anorexia susceptibility may be linked to stress-coping strategy and mom's stress levels during pregnancy Researchers have found that offspring born to mother rats stressed during pregnancy lost weight faster and failed to turn on appropriate brain hunger signals in response to exercise and food restriction, compared to offspring from non-stressed mothers.
Still Scratching Awhile ago I talked about my new obsession with scratching the flesh of my left hand with my right. Sigh. About a month ago I went and got all my … ...
Kids’ brain responses to food depend on their body composition Research using brain imaging technology has revealed a brain response pattern in children that might represent a step along the path to childhood obesity. The study, conducted by Nicole Fearnbach, a graduate student in Penn State University’s Department of Nutritional Sciences, scanned children’s brain activity while they viewed pictures of high- and low-calorie foods, and [...] The post Kids’ brain responses to food depend on their body composition appeared first on PsyPost.
Mother’s diet affects offspring alcohol and nicotine use in lab animal study Researchers at The Rockefeller University have found in a study with rats that a mother’s consumption of a fat-rich diet during pregnancy increases her offspring’s risk of a combined alcohol and nicotine abuse in adolescence. The study performed by Olga Karatayev in the Neurobiology Laboratory of Dr. Sarah Leibowitz at Rockefeller provides insight into early [...] The post Mother’s diet affects offspring alcohol and nicotine use in lab animal study appeared first on PsyPost.
The quality of your friendships is one of the strongest predictors of life satisfaction In the most inclusive study to date on friendship, Chapman University research looks at gender, age, and sexual orientation differences in the number of friends people rely on for support, to what extent they choose friends of the same gender, and overall life satisfaction. In a survey of more than 25,000 participants from all walks [...] The post The quality of your friendships is one of the strongest predictors of life satisfaction appeared first on PsyPost.
Researcher disputes claim that humans can distinguish 1 trillion odors An Arizona State University researcher is calling into question recent findings that the human nose is capable of distinguishing at least 1 trillion odors. Rick Gerkin, an assistant research professor with ASU School of Life Sciences, says the data used in a study made public last year does not support this claim. According to Gerkin, [...] The post Researcher disputes claim that humans can distinguish 1 trillion odors appeared first on PsyPost.
Smartphones may be detrimental to learning A yearlong study of first-time smartphone users by researchers at Rice University and the U.S. Air Force found that users felt smartphones were actually detrimental to their ability to learn. The research paper “You Can Lead a Horse to Water But You Cannot Make Him Learn: Smartphone Use in Higher Education” appeared in a recent [...] The post Smartphones may be detrimental to learning appeared first on PsyPost.
Memory and thinking ability keep getting worse for years after a stroke, new study finds A stroke happens in an instant. And many who survive one report that their brain never works like it once did. But new research shows that these problems with memory and thinking ability keep getting worse for years afterward – and happen faster than normal brain aging. Stroke survivors also had a faster rate of [...] The post Memory and thinking ability keep getting worse for years after a stroke, new study finds appeared first on PsyPost.
Researchers find the organization of the human brain to be nearly ideal Have you ever wondered why the human brain evolved the way it did? A new study by Northeastern physicist Dmitri Krioukov and his colleagues suggests an answer: to expedite the transfer of information from one brain region to another, enabling us to operate at peak capacity. The paper, published in the July 3 issue of Nature [...] The post Researchers find the organization of the human brain to be nearly ideal appeared first on PsyPost.
Predicting happiness of couples raising children with autism Parenting can be stressful and parenting children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) often means facing more challenges than those experienced by parents of typically developing children. The pressure can take its toll on the parents’ relationship. To understand what helps moms and dads of children with ASD strengthen their bond, researchers at the University of [...] The post Predicting happiness of couples raising children with autism appeared first on PsyPost.
Marijuana users substitute alcohol at 21 A recent study looked at marijuana and alcohol use in people between the ages of 18 and 24. It’s probably not surprising that the results show a drastic increase in alcohol consumption in people just over 21; after all, that’s the minimum legal age to drink. What University of Illinois economist Ben Crost found remarkable [...] The post Marijuana users substitute alcohol at 21 appeared first on PsyPost.
Study identifies brain abnormalities in people with schizophrenia Structural brain abnormalities in patients with schizophrenia, providing insight into how the condition may develop and respond to treatment, have been identified in an internationally collaborative study led by a Georgia State University scientist. Scientists at more than a dozen locations across the United States and Europe analyzed brain MRI scans from 2,028 schizophrenia patients [...] The post Study identifies brain abnormalities in people with schizophrenia appeared first on PsyPost.
Depression: Here's 1 Forgotten Approach The use of character strengths is not a cure for depression. It is an important adjunct. In fact, it's an often forgotten aspect of depression therapies. This is surprising because it couldn't be easier for people with depression or their therapists to integrate strengths into treatment. Here's how...
Why Working Mothers Shouldn’t Feel Guilty What do people really think about working mothers?
We Can Dream: A Marginalized Peoples Version of ‘Inside Out’ Ever wondered what Pixar's ‘Inside Out’ film would look like for peoples who identify with a particular social group (e.g., racial, ethnic, cultural, sexual orientation, etc.), and whose social group is an important part of their identity and personality, but whose social group is often inferiorized, discriminated against, othered, or marginalized by society? Read on.
7 Simple Steps to Master a Loving Relationship Commitment... Seven rules for staying together. One of the most complicated aspects of life is romantic relationships. People stumble through so many before they find the one and settle down. But how do you have a successful relationship? What is the secret? Through careful reflection of … ...
Echolocation: Bats do it, dolphins do it — now humans can do it, too University of California, Berkeley, physicists have used graphene to build lightweight ultrasonic loudspeakers and microphones, enabling people to mimic bats or dolphins’ ability to use sound to communicate and gauge the distance and speed of objects around them. More practically, the wireless ultrasound devices complement standard radio transmission using electromagnetic waves in areas where radio [...] The post Echolocation: Bats do it, dolphins do it — now humans can do it, too appeared first on PsyPost.
Faced with limited choices, prisoners become entrepreneurs to meet their needs Inside Gramercy maximum security prison, the market for nearly any kind of good or service is extremely limited, to say the least. But according to a new study in the Journal of Public Policy & Marketing, the severely restricted consumption choices faced by the 3,000 or so inmates at Gramercy create opportunities to pursue innovative [...] The post Faced with limited choices, prisoners become entrepreneurs to meet their needs appeared first on PsyPost.
Fewer women than men are shown online ads related to high-paying jobs Experiments by Carnegie Mellon University showed that significantly fewer women than men were shown online ads promising them help getting jobs paying more than $200,000, raising questions about the fairness of targeting ads online. The study of Google ads, using a CMU-developed tool called AdFisher that runs experiments with simulated user profiles, established that the [...] The post Fewer women than men are shown online ads related to high-paying jobs appeared first on PsyPost.