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Older and More Altruistic? There’s something intuitively satisfying about the idea that we become less self-centered as we age. It fits with the image that “older” also means “wiser.” And according to a new study from researchers in Singapore, there may be some truth to the theory that aging and altruism go together. Specifically,...
Transform Failure, Disaster, and Rejection Into a Fortune! Maybe of us underestimate the power and influence of life's darkest moments. When you learn these simple strategies you will never look at adversity like you have before.
The Yeasty Spread That May Be A Brain Food Neurotransmitter levels are boosted by consuming a spread popular in the UK and Australia. • Click here for your free sample of Dr Jeremy Dean's latest ebook The Anxiety Plan: 42 Strategies For Worry, Phobias, OCD and Panic • Dr Dean is also the author of Spark: 17 Steps That Will Boost Your Motivation For Anything.
A little inhibition shapes the brain's GPS A specific class of inhibitory neurons have been found in the cerebral cortex that plays a key role in how the brain encodes spatial information, report investigators.
Intrapsychic Conflict and Dysfunctional Family Patterns Conflicts within parents' minds over certain behavior can lead them to give double messages to kids, who in turn develop dysfunctional mental models about what is expected of them.
Schizophrenia, Bipolar Disorder, & the Microbiome You’ve probably heard about the rising importance of the microbiome — otherwise known as your gut bacteria. Researchers have started to find interesting links between the naturally occurring bacteria that live in our guts, and things we’ve traditionally attributed to the brain. Things like our … ...
We Can Lead the Way to a Nuclear Renaissance Reinventing nuclear power to be clean, safe, reliable. By Robert Hebner, Ph.D.
3 Ways to Know Yourself Better Given that we’re with ourselves 24/7, it seems we’d know ourselves extremely well, but it’s actually not so simple to truly know yourself.   Why is it so hard to … ...
It's the thought that counts: The neuro-anatomical basis of forgiveness revealed Researchers studied the areas of the brain involved in processes which prompt us to forgive those who have seriously, but unintentionally, messed up. Researchers specifically examined the role of a part of the brain, called anterior superior temporal sulcus (aSTS), and discovered that the larger the amount of grey matter in this patch of cortex, the more likely we are to forgive those who have made a serious mistake by accident.
Turning down the brain to erase fearful memories Weakening communication between two parts of the brain in mice reduced their fear levels, report investigators. This research may one day help extinguish traumatic memories in humans -- for example, in people with post-traumatic stress disorder, or PTSD.
Weather-forecast tool adapted to evaluate brain health of oxygen-deprived newborns Pediatric researchers have harnessed an analytical tool used to predict the weather to evaluate the effectiveness of therapies to reduce brain injury in newborns who suffer oxygen deprivation during birth.
Heading Back to Work After Baby- A Guest Post...   I’d like to take another break this week from my series on loss to feature an important piece by the incredible Lori Mihalich-Levin, founder of Mindful Return. Lori’s new and … ...
Why green spaces are good for grey matter Walking between busy urban environments and green spaces triggers changes in levels of excitement, engagement and frustration in the brain, a study of older people has found.
Negative sounds emphasized in burned-out brains Many people experience symptoms of burnout that include exhaustion, cynicism and reduced professional efficacy and often also difficulties in concentration and memory. The results of a new study reveal that the participants experiencing burnout symptoms reacted faster to negative sounds of voice, and slower to positive utterances.
On Raising an Honest Child How do we teach our kids to be honest, even if it means admitting to breaking the rules? Research on children's lying behavior might be able to provide us with some helpful hints.
What Does Dizziness Have to do With Sobriety? “I don’t have a drinking problem,” said Dean Martin. “I drink. I fall down. No problem.” The singer, movie actor and television celebrity who died on Christmas Day, 1995, was … ...
The 8 Voices of Laziness and How to Overcome Them According to a study from Deloitte, 70 percent of respondents binge watch streaming content. This means watching an average of five television shows (50-minutes long) in one sitting. Do we have a laziness epidemic on our hands? It’s possible.    Laziness is something everyone struggles with … ...
What You Are Good at Matters More Than You Realize Want to be happier with your life and less likely to be depressed? Here’s a research-backed way of getting there that I think you will really enjoy: Focus on what … ...
Recognizing Emotional Abuse What is emotional abuse? There is no “one size fits all” description for emotional abuse; however, here is list of typical behaviors of emotional abusers: Abusers will treat another person in a utilitarian manner; as an object to be used, rather than as a person … ...
Rowlett High School Teacher Earns APA Award For Excellence Tiffany Karns recognized for commitment to psychology education