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Scientists confirm: The feel-good ‘exercise hormone’ irisin really does exist Scientists in the US have found that a feel-good exercise hormone called irisin does indeed exists in humans, putting to bed long-disputed claims that it is a myth. The research team, led by Bruce Spiegelman from the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, used mass spectrometry to look for irisin in blood samples of individuals after exercise, finding [...] The post Scientists confirm: The feel-good ‘exercise hormone’ irisin really does exist appeared first on PsyPost.
A World Wanting to be Heard I wonder how many of us out there sit alone in our quiet rooms at night just desperately wanting to be heard and seen. Most of us spend our days out there in the world — talking to people, meeting with people, interacting with people. … ...
Stop Seeking Higher Purpose and Discover your Lower One... (Not ‘higher’ in terms of heavenly. Not ‘lower’ in terms of hell. This is not a spiritual article.) You want to take the high road, learn from all life’s challenges, … ...
Men Also Get Eating Disorders -I’m Not Kidding! The first time I discovered bulimia was in 1980. I was a freshman at Penn State University. The emotional release and feeling of control it gave me over my body was intoxicating.  In just a short burst of time, I felt both the best and … ...
The 34 Best Bloggers Who Advocate for Mental Health and Wellness WatersedgeCounselling has just been named one of the Top 34 Best Blogs on the Internet Who Advocate and Inform People About Mental Health and Wellness. We are so excited to have been recognised by Australian Counselling, and are thrilled our weekly blog posts are not only reaching people, but also making an impact. To peruse […]
Real Talk: How I Live with Body Dysmorphia Just because I’m thin doesn’t mean I see myself that way. Let me start by saying that I’ve never been fat, at least not in any conventional sense. I don’t have stretch marks, a muffin top, or carry excess baby weight. My highest weight was … ...
How anesthesia's brain effects differ in older adults, children A series of papers is detailing the different ways common anesthetics affect the brains of older patients and children, findings that could lead to improved monitoring technology and safety of general anesthesia for such patients.
Trusting a Therapist I’ve seen my share of therapists and counselors over the years due to my childhood abuse.  I’ve seen professional psychiatrists when I was anorexic, school counselors each time I came … ...
More evidence that music eases pain, anxiety after surgery Research shows surgery patients who listened to music, either before, during or after surgery, were better off — in terms of reduced pain, less anxiety and more patient satisfaction.
Stressed out parents: 'Never again' Recent study shows that the drop in happiness experienced by parents after the birth of first child was larger than the experience of unemployment, divorce or the death of a partner.
The Adversarial Nature of Mental Health Advocacy In addition to being a writer and speaker, I am an advocate for persons living with mental illness. Advocating, in its purest form, is essentially debating. It requires me to … ...
5 Signs You're Trying too Hard to Please Everyone Mentally strong people don't try to please everyone.
5 More Ways to Be Assertive with Intimidating People In the previous piece about being assertive with people who intimidate you, we talked about clarifying your values, starting small and shifting your thinking about the intimidating person. That is, we can change our perception of the person, so we no longer feel intimidated by … ...
Sequestered prion protein takes the good mood away, suggests new hypothesis on depression The discovery of antidepressant drugs led to the first biochemical hypothesis of depression, known as the monoamine hypothesis. However, this hypothesis does not seem to fully explain the complexity of human depression. Now a new study offers one more important key that may increase our understanding of the pathogenesis behind clinical depression and neurodegenerative disorders.
How a Jet-Set Lifestyle Could Affect Mental Health The effect of frequent, long-distance travel on mental health. » Continue reading: How a Jet-Set Lifestyle Could Affect Mental Health » Read HealthiestBlog.com, the new site from PsyBlog's author Related articles:The Traumatic Effects of Violent News On Mental Health The Mental Strategy For Little Hassles That Protects Your Health Urban Living: Green Spaces Improve Your Mental Health Psychedelic Drug Use Not Associated With Mental Health Problems Here’s How Many Workers Hide Mental Health Problems From Their Managers
Finding Forgiveness: Moving Forward Forgiveness is the ability to let go of the past in order to move forward. Letting go of old wounds is the antidote to hurtful experiences and can dramatically improve … ...
Grammar: Eventually the brain opts for the easy route Languages are constantly evolving -- and grammar is no exception. The way in which the brain processes language triggers adjustments. If the brain has to exert itself too much to cope with difficult case constructions, it usually simplifies them over time, as linguists demonstrate in a study on languages all over the world.
Lessons From Native American Culture “Healing is a matter of time, but it is sometimes also a matter of opportunity”. – Hippocrates There are wonderful opportunities to learn from other cultures how to manage our emotional  turmoil and stop the self-blame and the wild goose-chase.  When we look at other … ...
Depression, stress, anxiety and anger compound risk of cardiovascular disease in rheumatoid arthritis patients Depressive symptoms, stress, anxiety, and anger and lack of social support in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) were linked to atherosclerosis—a build-up of fatty deposits in the arteries that contributes to cardiovascular disease. The study suggests that screening and treatment of psychosocial symptoms may curb the cardiovascular disease burden in RA patients.
How to Stay Focused at Work During Personal Crisis If you’ve made your career a top priority, you’re no doubt a pro at honoring your professional commitments and continually striving for excellence. You may have even made sacrifices to succeed in the workplace — like not calling in sick when you probably should have … ...