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The Art of Shouting Quietly: What Every Introvert Needs...     When you speak clearly, you don’t have to speak loudly. While this is something every introvert knows, it is not how we are told we should promote ourselves. … ...
Nature Calms the Mind—Even in Photos Brain research on why nature is calming and restorative.
Social climbing makes the English happier than Americans People who grew up in a working class family are more satisfied in later life than those from a higher class background according to new research. The study also found that English people who climb the social ladder are more content and happy when they get older than people in the States who are similarly upwardly mobile. The research sought to find out whether social mobility makes people happier in later life while taking into account people’s living conditions.
Raising Your Fee Could Make You a Better Therapist Contrary to the subtle and not-so-subtle messages you got in grad school, having people pay real money for the services you provide doesn’t make you an awful person. In fact, it may make you more effective. I recently raised my fee to $150 per session. … ...
Teen Addictions: From Warning Signs to Treatment Sam came into my office with fear in his eyes. His father had called me and stated he needed to find some help for his boy – all had not been right for a while. Sam was a freshman in college and had been doing … ...
Why People Drop Out of College: A Freudian Approach It’s no surprise to anyone that many people who start college do not end up completing it. The U.S. Department of Education claims that “as of 2012, only 59 percent of students on average received a bachelor’s degree within a six-year period. The numbers are … ...
Tackling a Heartbreaking Project For about 15 years I have had a wall dedicated to family pictures in the houses where I have lived. It includes photos of blood family and the kind of … ...
Does Your Prospective Boss's Personality Suit You? Compatibility with your prospective boss is the one factor that will likely have the most profound impact on job satisfaction, and maybe your career. Yet it’s remarkably neglected in the job interview. It's the elephant in the room that not enough job seekers dare to uncover. If you ask the right questions, however, you'll greatly increase your odds of success.
Job services lacking for young people with autism As autism becomes more prevalent, the need grows for services that help young people with the disorder to find and keep jobs, indicates new research led by Michigan State University education scholars. Some 50,000 people with autism spectrum disorder turn 18 years old every year in the United States, and these “transition youth” – shifting [...] The post Job services lacking for young people with autism appeared first on PsyPost.
Researchers identify the source of the debilitating memory loss in people with psychosis As disabling as its delusions and hallucinations, psychosis’ devastating toll on memory arises from dysfunction of frontal and temporal lobe regions in the brain that rob sufferers of the ability to make associative connections, a UC Davis study has found, pinpointing potential target areas for treatments to help the more than 3.2 million Americans for [...] The post Researchers identify the source of the debilitating memory loss in people with psychosis appeared first on PsyPost.
Musical tastes offer a window into how you think Do you like your jazz to be Norah Jones or Ornette Coleman, your classical music to be Bach or Stravinsky, or your rock to be Coldplay or Slayer? The answer could give an insight into the way you think, say researchers from the University of Cambridge. In a study published today in the journal PLOS [...] The post Musical tastes offer a window into how you think appeared first on PsyPost.
Having wealthy neighbors may skew beliefs about overall wealth distribution Wealthy people may be likely to oppose redistribution of wealth because they have biased information about how wealthy most people actually are, according to new research published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science. The findings indicate that people use their own neighborhoods and communities as a gauge of how much [...] The post Having wealthy neighbors may skew beliefs about overall wealth distribution appeared first on PsyPost.
Study examines how neurons in the brain remain electrically stable In biology, stability is important. From body temperature to blood pressure and sugar levels, our body ensures that these remain within reasonable limits and do not reach potentially damaging extremes. Neurons in the brain are no different and, in fact, have developed a number of ways to stabilise their electrical activity so as to avoid [...] The post Study examines how neurons in the brain remain electrically stable appeared first on PsyPost.
Schools with more minorities tend to punish students rather than seek psychological interventions Poor schools that have more black and minority students tend to punish students rather than seek medical or psychological interventions for them, according to a Penn State sociologist. “There’s been a real push toward school safety and there’s been a real push for schools to show they are being accountable,” said David Ramey, assistant professor [...] The post Schools with more minorities tend to punish students rather than seek psychological interventions appeared first on PsyPost.
Women’s sexual risk-taking when vacationing the focus of new study Relaxing beach vacations are perfect for sexual experimentation with a steady partner, while group tours and sightseeing trips are the ultimate contexts for casual sex with acquaintances or strangers, women said in a new survey. More than 850 U.S. women, ranging in age from 18 to 50, participated in the online survey, which asked about [...] The post Women’s sexual risk-taking when vacationing the focus of new study appeared first on PsyPost.
Coping by avoidance in making decisions for relatives in ICU may lead to PTSD Family members who make major medical decisions for relatives in an intensive care unit (ICU) may suffer posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) if they cope by avoiding the situation, according to a new study by scientists at Case Western Reserve University’s Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing. The patient isn’t the only one affected by the [...] The post Coping by avoidance in making decisions for relatives in ICU may lead to PTSD appeared first on PsyPost.
The Loopholes Used to Justify Drinking Because of my interest in habits, I read a lot of memoirs of addiction. I don’t tackle addiction in Better Than Before, but still, I find that I get a lot of insights from these accounts. I recently finished an excellent new memoir, Sarah Hepola’s … ...
How the Largest U.S. Association of Psychologists Colluded in Torture Earlier this year, news broke that American Psychological Association had secretly collaborated with the U.S. government to make a legal and ethical case for torture in the wake of the 9/11 terror attacks. Here’s what we now know—and what we can do to prevent it from happening again....
Researchers quantify nature’s role in human well-being The benefits people reap from nature – or the harm they can suffer from natural disasters – can seem as obvious as an earthquake. Yet putting numbers to changes in those ecosystem services and how human well-being is affected has fallen short, until now. A team of researchers from Michigan State University and Chinese Academy [...] The post Researchers quantify nature’s role in human well-being appeared first on PsyPost.
Low levels of the hormone vasopressin linked to social deficit in children with autism A brain-chemistry deficit in children with autism may help to explain their social difficulties, according to new findings from the Stanford University School of Medicine. The research team found a correlation between low levels of vasopressin, a hormone involved in social behavior, and the inability of autistic children to understand that other people’s thoughts and [...] The post Low levels of the hormone vasopressin linked to social deficit in children with autism appeared first on PsyPost.