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Laughter as a window on the infant mind What makes a baby laugh? The answer might reveal a lot about the making of our minds, says Tom Stafford. What makes babies laugh? It sounds like one of the most fun questions a researcher could investigate, but there’s a serious scientific reason why Caspar Addyman wants to find out. He’s not the first to […]
Child Porn Offenders and the Sentencing Process: Part Two,... Different Motivations, Different Risks In part one of this posting I discussed the increasingly aggressive sanctions i that are levied against most child porn offenders, noting that current sentencing guidelines have … ...
The Cost of Secrets: Understanding the Impact on Self... Secrets are costly. Often motivated by fear, an illusion of protecting self or other or a blatant attempt to hurt or manipulate another, they have been demonstrated to burden us … ...
Suicide risk tied to women's social connectedness New study suggests that being connected to friends, family and social groups may offer some protection against suicide.
Autism costs could skyrocket, experts warn For the first time, health economists have projected the current and future costs of caring for people with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) in the United States.
Feeling stressed? Try an aquarium. Scientists at the National Marine Aquarium recently had the chance to study how one of its larger exhibits was affecting people while it was being slowly restocked with new fish.
Study: Depressed females have over-active glutamate receptor gene Numerous genes that regulate the activity of a neurotransmitter in the brain have been found to be abundant in brain tissue of depressed females. This could be an underlying cause of the higher incidence of suicide among women, according to research at the University of Illinois at Chicago. Studying postmortem tissue from brains of psychiatric [...] The post Study: Depressed females have over-active glutamate receptor gene appeared first on PsyPost.
Justin Bieber Admits to Feelings of Depression There are few faces more recognizable than that of Justin Bieber. In the time since he first emerged on the scene, he has enjoyed a level of fame that most … ...
The Trouble With Facebook How To Use Facebook
Happy to Be a Horrible Homemaker I am a ridiculously horrible homemaker. And realizing that makes me happy.  So happy, in fact, that I feel like I could fly across the sky with all the weight that has been lifted off of me. Let me back track for a moment. I … ...
With racial segregation declining between neighborhoods, segregation now taking new form Recent research has shown that racial segregation in the U.S. is declining between neighborhoods, but a new study indicates that segregation is manifesting itself in other ways — not disappearing. “We just can’t get too excited by recent declines in neighborhood segregation,” said lead author Daniel Lichter, the Ferris Family Professor in the Department of [...] The post With racial segregation declining between neighborhoods, segregation now taking new form appeared first on PsyPost.
Can't Stand Your Self-Absorbed Parent? Got an aging parent or in-law who's a narcissist? They're arrogant, have a sense of entitlement, are always ready to instill guilt, they insist rules don't apply to them, and they fly into a rage if challenged. There's help for you.
New ‘VAST’ tool gives neuroscientists previously unachievable brain images at a nanoscale resolution A new imaging tool developed by Boston scientists could do for the brain what the telescope did for space exploration. In the first demonstration of how the technology works, published July 30 in the journal Cell, the researchers look inside the brain of an adult mouse at a scale previously unachievable, generating images at a [...] The post New ‘VAST’ tool gives neuroscientists previously unachievable brain images at a nanoscale resolution appeared first on PsyPost.
Study examines the neural processes behind depressive ruminations and the idling brain Depressed people often find themselves preoccupied with guilty, shameful, or self-defeating thoughts for large parts of their day. These thoughts not only distract from other activities but also fail to resolve the underlying life issues. Further, the ideas that receive focused attention in these depressive ruminations are frequently quite distorted and lead to distress. The [...] The post Study examines the neural processes behind depressive ruminations and the idling brain appeared first on PsyPost.
Computerized treatment may combat PTSD symptoms Some 10-15 percent of combat veterans struggle with wounds invisible to the naked eye: post-traumatic stress. Their lives are ridden with debilitating symptoms: insomnia, flashbacks, depression, anxiety, guilt, and ever-present tension. While there is no cure-all for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), cognitive behavioral therapy — which actively reprocesses traumatic events to reduce symptoms — has [...] The post Computerized treatment may combat PTSD symptoms appeared first on PsyPost.
Fading Fast: Is 'Thank You' a Thing of the Past? How to reinvigorate the power of appreciation. Despite our well-meaning efforts to appreciate our fellows, our favorite phrase of acknowledgment seems to be ringing hollow these days. Can “Thank you” be restored to its former glory by capitalizing on the psychology of message delivery -- or are we doomed to a thankless world?
13 Reasons to Invest in a Marriage and Couple Relationship Retreat Your marriage and couple relationship is a long-term investment into your future wellbeing and happiness. When we commit to a relationship, we regard it to be ‘for life,’ or if not, at least for a significant period of time. But have you contemplated how to maintain this precious investment so that it continues to provide […]
How Connection Saves Us from Addiction Humans suffer most when we lack connection. Take, for example, Tom Hanks with his volleyball, Wilson, in the movie “Cast Away.” I was distraught when he lost Wilson and cried as though my personal friend had drowned at sea. We will force connection with inanimate … ...
Genetic tug of war in the brain influences behavior Not every mom and dad agree on how their offspring should behave. But in genetics as in life, parenting is about knowing when your voice needs to be heard, and the best ways of doing so. Typically, compromise reigns, and one copy of each gene is inherited from each parent so that the two contribute [...] The post Genetic tug of war in the brain influences behavior appeared first on PsyPost.
Positive reinforcement plays key role in cognitive task performance in ADHD kids A little recognition for a job well done means a lot to children with Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) – more so than it would for typically developing kids. That praise, or other possible reward, improves the performance of children with ADHD on certain cognitive tasks, but until a recent study led by researchers from the [...] The post Positive reinforcement plays key role in cognitive task performance in ADHD kids appeared first on PsyPost.