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7 Ways a Person Can Be Abused A bruise is not a requirement for proof of abusive behavior. There are many other ways a person can be abused. Abuse can be manipulation, exploitation, maltreatment, neglect, violence, cruelty, harm, hurt, ill-treatment, and exploitive. The seven ways it is manifested is through physical, mental, … ...
Post-Partum Disorders in African-American Women (Video) Video about African-American women and post-partum depression and psychosis....
Review of 100 published psychology studies finds only one-third are reliable — now what? The ability to repeat a study and find the same results twice is a prerequisite for building scientific knowledge. Replication allows us to ensure empirical findings are reliable and refines our understanding of when a finding occurs. It may surprise you to learn, then, that scientists do not often conduct – much less publish – [...] The post Review of 100 published psychology studies finds only one-third are reliable — now what? appeared first on PsyPost.
Creating Weekdays You Actually Enjoy, Part 2 On Monday, in this piece, I shared a few ideas on how we can create weekdays we enjoy. Many of us view the weekdays (days most of us are working) … ...
Free Webinar: Mindfulness-Based Recovery Coaching: Overcoming Attachments & Recovering... Join Psych Central host Zoë Kessler for a conversation with Michele Happe, MA. Michele graduated from California State University with a Master’s in Psychology. A licenced drug and alcohol counselor, in Michele began working with addicts and co-dependents. Michele also directed one of the first … ...
How to Have Fun Getting your CEUs As a mental health professional, the learning never stops. While I love continuing education, I also know that it can feel hard to fit in when you are seeing clients and running a business. Recently I have decided to make this process a whole lot … ...
A Good Method For Practicing SAT/ACT Reading Standardized tests require students to read with much greater attention to detail than they may be used to. Here’s one of the methods we use to train our students to … ...
Earn Your Title It seems pretty cut and dry doesn’t it?  You have a child; you clothe that child, feed that child, you make sure that that child has a roof over their … ...
5 More Creative Prompts to Shake Up Your Perspective Last week, in this piece, I shared five of my favorite prompts from Tanner Christensen’s new book The Creativity Challenge. These prompts focus on changing how we think about thinking. … ...
Surprised? Cholinergic neurons send broadcasts enabling us to learn from the unexpected Neuroscientists have discovered a set of cholinergic neurons in the basal forebrain that broadcast messages throughout the cerebral cortex, rapidly informing multiple distributed subregions of any surprising rewards or punishments -- what scientists call reinforcers. It's a way we learn from the unexpected.
Creative and neurotic: Is neuroticism fueled by overthinking? Psychologists have presented a new theory for why neurotic unhappiness and creativity go hand-in-hand. The authors argue that the part of the brain responsible for self-generated thought is highly active in neuroticism, which yields both of the trait's positives (e.g., creativity) and negatives (e.g., misery).
Does Anticipating Temptation Help You Resist Temptation? In Smart Change, I talk about the importance of planning for temptations. The idea is that temptations are hard to deal with in the moment, because they suggest something that would feel good to do right now. Those temptations can capture your motivational system and drive you to do something that is not in your long-term best interests.
7 New Books to Read This Fall The best new reads on psychology
Parkinson’s disease brain cells at risk of burnout, like an overheating motor The death of brain cells in Parkinson’s disease may be caused by a form of cellular energy crisis in neurons that require unusually high quantities of energy to carry out their job of regulating movement, researchers have reported.
Alzheimer’s disease thought to be accelerated by an abnormal build-up of fat in the brain People with Alzheimer’s disease have fat deposits in the brain. For the first time since the disease was described 109 years ago, researchers have discovered accumulations of fat droplets in the brain of patients who died from the disease and have identified the nature of the fat.
About 10 percent of mothers experienced depression two years after Hurricane Katrina About 10 percent of mothers experienced chronic, persistent depressive symptoms two years after Hurricane Katrina slammed into the Gulf Coast, killing more than 1,800 people, displacing hundreds of thousands and causing widespread damage estimated at more than $100 billion, according to a new study.
Insecure Body Language: Standing with Confidence You can tell a lot about a person when you notice his or her body posture, the way people hold themselves gives off important information. For instance a lot of … ...
Can’t Make a Decision? 4 Things to Try You’ve just worked your third 12-hour day in a row, with no sign of the craziness winding down in the days ahead, when a client calls you with yet another problem that needed to be solved — yesterday. In that moment, it may seem like … ...
Comparing Yourself To Others Makes You Anxious Everybody is anxious these days. It’s the thing to be. The ADAA says a full 18% of the population has some kind of anxiety disorder. And those are just the … ...
Why can’t we understand the link between teens, drugs... Apparently, treating both illnesses as inexplicably intertwined is hard. Some get hung up on the "chicken or egg" debate: Which came first- depression or SUD Does it matter? ...