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‘Brain training’ app may improve memory and daily functioning of people with schizophrenia A ‘brain training’ iPad game developed and tested by researchers at the University of Cambridge may improve the memory of patients with schizophrenia, helping them in their daily lives at work and living independently, according to research published today. Schizophrenia is a long-term mental health condition that causes a range of psychological symptoms, ranging from [...] The post ‘Brain training’ app may improve memory and daily functioning of people with schizophrenia appeared first on PsyPost.
Study: Negative stereotypes cause Christians to underperform on scientific tests The majority of Americans are Christians, but the majority of American scientists are not. A 2009 survey found nearly half of scientists had no religious affiliation. Only 31 percent identified as Christian. What causes the disconnect between science and Christianity? New research suggests that negative stereotypes about the scientific competency of Christians may be a [...] The post Study: Negative stereotypes cause Christians to underperform on scientific tests appeared first on PsyPost.
Perfectionism: Toxic, Volatile & Amazing (Depends Who You Ask)... If you feel burnt-out and rundown in your career, your perfectionist attitude could be the reason. If you feel invigorated and optimistic about the future of your career, it could be … ...
New survey to distinguishing between expectable vs. worrisome early childhood misbehavior Researchers at Northwestern University are using a novel dimensional method for distinguishing misbehavior that is expectable in early childhood versus that which is cause for clinical concern. Their study is published in the August 2015 issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Using a survey developed by the researchers [...] The post New survey to distinguishing between expectable vs. worrisome early childhood misbehavior appeared first on PsyPost.
Look into my pupils: Pupil mimicry may lead to increased trust People often mimic each other’s facial expressions or postures without even knowing it, but new research shows that they also mimic the size of each other’s pupils, which can lead to increased trust. The findings, published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science, reveal that participants who mimicked the dilated pupils [...] The post Look into my pupils: Pupil mimicry may lead to increased trust appeared first on PsyPost.
Fly brains filter out visual information caused by their own movements, like humans Our brains are constantly barraged with sensory information, but have an amazing ability to filter out just what they need to understand what’s going on around us. For instance, if you stand perfectly still in a room, and that room rotates around you, it’s terrifying. But stand still in a room and turn your eyes, [...] The post Fly brains filter out visual information caused by their own movements, like humans appeared first on PsyPost.
How language gives your brain a break Here’s a quick task: Take a look at the sentences below and decide which is the most effective. (1) “John threw out the old trash sitting in the kitchen.” (2) “John threw the old trash sitting in the kitchen out.” Either sentence is grammatically acceptable, but you probably found the first one to be more [...] The post How language gives your brain a break appeared first on PsyPost.
Chronic insomnia sufferers may find relief with half of standard pill dose The roughly nine million Americans who rely on prescription sleeping pills to treat chronic insomnia may be able to get relief from as little as half of the drugs, and may even be helped by taking placebos in the treatment plan, according to new research published today in the journal Sleep Medicine by researchers from [...] The post Chronic insomnia sufferers may find relief with half of standard pill dose appeared first on PsyPost.
Small group of neurons adjust to difference between expected and actual sensory information It takes a surprisingly small cluster of brain cells deep within the cerebellum to learn how to serve a tennis ball, or line up a hockey shot. Researchers at McGill University led by Kathleen Cullen from the Department of Physiology have discovered that to learn new motor skills, neurons within the cerebellum engage in elegant, [...] The post Small group of neurons adjust to difference between expected and actual sensory information appeared first on PsyPost.
How to convince vaccine skeptics — and how not to Many people who are skeptical about vaccinating their children can be convinced to do so, but only if the argument is presented in a certain way, a team of psychologists from UCLA and the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign reported today. The research appears in the online early edition of the journal Proceedings of the [...] The post How to convince vaccine skeptics — and how not to appeared first on PsyPost.
Marriage can lead to dramatic reduction in heavy drinking in young adults Research on alcohol-use disorders consistently shows problem drinking decreases as we age. Also called, “maturing out,” these changes generally begin during young adulthood and are partially caused by the roles we take on as we become adults. Now, researchers collaborating between the University of Missouri and Arizona State University have found evidence that marriage can [...] The post Marriage can lead to dramatic reduction in heavy drinking in young adults appeared first on PsyPost.
Life and the Essence of Adolescence During a summer vacation on a lake in Wisconsin, I look at my son and daughter, my nieces and nephews, and soak it all in. Life is a passing of these moments, I know, ones we cannot hold onto. A startling discovery of exploring this important adolescent period of life is that the ESSENCE of adolescence is also the key way to keep our brains vital and growing.
I Am My Own Bipolar Hi there. If you are reading this, please know everything written is coming from my brain — which means these thoughts are all real to me, but likely unrealistic or potentially disturbing to “normal” people. I consider a “normal” person anyone that advises me not … ...
Poor Social Judgment and Schizophrenia This article examines the qualities of alienation, introversion and divergent thinking that may typify the individual with schizophrenia. These characteristics can synergistically contribute to poor social judgment as seen in the behavior and choices of that individual. In fact, they may form a triad and a pattern as seen persons with schizophrenia generally.
Our elegant brain: Motor learning in the fast lane To learn new motor skills, neurons within the cerebellum engage in elegant, virtually mathematical, computations to quickly compare expected and actual sensory feedback. They then quickly readjust, changing the strength of connections between other neurons to form new patterns in the brain in order to accomplish the task at hand, researchers report.
Trouble spot in brain linked to learning difficulties in Down syndrome identified New brain research has mapped a key trouble spot likely to contribute to intellectual disability in Down syndrome. Scientists suggest the findings could be used to inform future therapies which normalize the function of disrupted brain networks in the condition.
Eating Disorders Online: Support or Triggers? Much of the public learned about pro-ana and pro-mia websites from an episode of the Oprah Winfrey show back in 2001. When people go online for information and support about eating disorders, does what they find help or make them worse?
A Riddle For All Ages When my son was old enough to understand the basic concept of infinity (but hardly its nuance), he presented me with a “trick riddle.”
5 Tips For Getting Unstuck “If you don’t like where you are, move. You are not a tree.” – Jim Rohn Every once in a while I go through what I like to call a … ...
What Makes A Great Lover The ingredients that comprise a great lover may surprise you.