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Do We Really Need Another Classification System in Psychiatry?... With the introduction of the DSM-5 (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders) in 2013, the NIMH (National Institute of Mental Health) announced that it would be devising its own classification system, the RDoC (Research Domain Criteria). Huh? This is crazy- we need another classification … ...
Where Do Phobias Come From? Outwardly, it seems as though other people’s bullying of me caused my lifelong fear of human beings. And it certainly acted as a trigger. But is that the real cause? … ...
A Parachute for the Mentally Falling When Alcoholics Anonymous was started by Bill Wilson and Bob Smith in 1935, peer counseling was a new concept. That their concept had validity is borne out by the fact … ...
Why Conflict Is Great for Your Relationship & How... Conflict is bad. Healthy couples hardly fight. These are the most common misconceptions about conflict. Because as Lena Aburdene Derhally, MS, LPC, said, “Relationships free of conflict are unrealistic.” Conflict is inevitable because differences are inevitable. Each partner comes from “a unique set of circumstances … ...
Another Circle Of ADHD To Avoid If part of the problem is lack of awareness, particularly lack of self awareness, than how can we possibly make any efforts to manage our problems. We may not even recognize that they exist....
Why "Science Benefits When We Think More and Do Less" Does the productivity of scientific careers come at the cost of creativity? One foundation director worries that it does.
15 Ways To Make Therapy Worth Your Energy Therapy can be a big waste of time. But therapy can also be one of the best things that could ever happen to you. What makes the difference is who … ...
Religion rarely part of ICU conversation In less than 20 percent of family meetings in the intensive care unit do doctors and other health care providers discuss religion or spirituality, a new study finds.
Alcohol education should begin at age 9 One in 9 eighth graders reports being drunk at least once, new research finds.
Japan's worst day for teen suicides More Japanese school pupils commit suicide on September 1 each year than on any other date, according to research.
How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love My SSRI I’m changing medications right now. When I was diagnosed a year ago, I didn’t think I needed medication. I definitely didn’t want medication. I thought there’d be a non-medicine quick … ...
Gardens morphing into spirals: Researchers examine what it’s like to trip on Salvia divinorum A team of researchers recently investigated the subjective psychological effects of the psychedelic plant known as Salvia divinorum. “Our main findings indicate that smoked [Salvia divinorum] facilitates an intense altered state of consciousness consisting of marked changes in affect, cognition, interoception, and sense of reality,” Peter H. Addy of VA Connecticut Healthcare System and his [...] The post Gardens morphing into spirals: Researchers examine what it’s like to trip on Salvia divinorum appeared first on PsyPost.
This Trait Costs Men Money But Makes Them Marriage Material Would you rather have a broke partner or a broken heart?
7 Things You Shouldn’t Say to People in Therapy You may judge, but therapy saved my life. My best friend and I are constantly playing phone tag. But there’s one person who promises to have my undivided attention once a week, no matter what: Dr. R, my therapist. For the past 2.5 years, we’ve … ...
Body fat hormone leptin influences runner’s high The euphoric feeling that gives runners a motivational boost in the middle of their workout is in part modulated by the satiety hormone leptin, a new study reports September 1 in Cell Metabolism. Mice with reduced leptin signaling in the brain logged nearly twice as many miles on a running wheel compared with normal mice. [...] The post Body fat hormone leptin influences runner’s high appeared first on PsyPost.
The timing of sleep just as important as quantity Washington State University researchers have found that the timing of an animal’s sleep can be just as important as how much sleeps it gets. Ilia Karatsoreos, an assistant professor in WSU’s Department of Integrative Physiology and Neuroscience, shifted mice from their usual cycle of sleeping and waking and saw that, while they got enough sleep, [...] The post The timing of sleep just as important as quantity appeared first on PsyPost.
Preterm birth linked with lower math abilities and less wealth People who are born premature tend to accumulate less wealth as adults, and a new study suggests that this may be due to lower mathematics abilities. The findings, published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science, show that preterm birth is associated with lower academic abilities in childhood, and lower educational attainment [...] The post Preterm birth linked with lower math abilities and less wealth appeared first on PsyPost.
Helping toddlers understand emotion key to development The simple parenting strategy of helping toddlers understand emotion may reduce behavioral problems later on, finds a federally funded study led by a Michigan State University researcher. The study, published in the September issue of the Journal of Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics, could ultimately help those most in need. Toddlers with higher risk, specifically those [...] The post Helping toddlers understand emotion key to development appeared first on PsyPost.
Possible weapon against PTSD: Blocking newly identified memory pathway could prevent the disorder About 8 million Americans suffer from nightmares and flashbacks to a traumatic event. This condition, known as post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), is particularly common among soldiers who have been in combat, though it can also be triggered by physical attack or natural disaster. Studies have shown that trauma victims are more likely to develop PTSD [...] The post Possible weapon against PTSD: Blocking newly identified memory pathway could prevent the disorder appeared first on PsyPost.
Parents’ views on justice affect babies’ moral development Babies’ neural responses to morally charged scenarios are influenced by their parents’ attitudes toward justice, new research from the University of Chicago shows. The study from Prof. Jean Decety and postdoctoral scholar Jason Cowell, which appears in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, sheds new light on the mechanisms underlying the development of morality [...] The post Parents’ views on justice affect babies’ moral development appeared first on PsyPost.