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Dealing with Rejection When You Have Depression, Part 2... Rejection is really hard for anyone. But it’s especially hard when you’re struggling with depression. The rejection only solidifies your already sinking self-esteem. It substantiates all the terrible thoughts already swirling in your mind: You aren’t good enough. You’re a failure. You can’t have a … ...
Bipolar II & Migraines When I was a child I suffered from migraines. I pain was horrific and no pain reliever would alleviate the pain. My mom would sit by my bed holding a … ...
Changing Your Expectations Can Make You Happier You know that hashtag #TheWorstPartOfDepressionIs? I was wondering how it relates to autistic people. I didn’t have to wonder for long though. When you’re autistic, the worst part of depression … ...
'Brain signature' that predicts human emotions discovered Researchers have discovered a way to predict human emotions based on brain activity. The study is unusual because of its accuracy -- more than 90 percent -- and the large number of participants who reflect the general adult population rather than just college students. The findings could help in diagnosing and treating a range of mental and physical health conditions.
Trust me: Research sheds light on why people trust Trust matters whether it's love, money or another part of our everyday lives that requires risk, and a new study sheds light on what motivates people to make that leap of faith.
Sleep Does More For Memory Than Just Preserve It, Study Finds Sleep does more for memory than just protect it against forgetting. » Continue reading: Sleep Does More For Memory Than Just Preserve It, Study Finds » Read HealthiestBlog.com, the new site from PsyBlog's author Related articles:Study Finds Memory Has a Fascinating Effect On Sleep You Can Learn a New Language While You Sleep, Study Finds Memory: The Weirdest Ever Fact is Actually True, Study Reveals A Well-Known Trick To Jog Your Memory DOES Actually Work, Study Finds Memory Loss NOT Always The First Sign of Alzheimer’s, New Study Finds
How to Know You Really Love Animals Back in May, I got to meet legendary zoo director and animal activist Jack Hanna. He even signed a cool postcard to me – addressing me by name. At the time, … ...
A penny for your thoughts: How much is your time really worth? A penny could in theory purchase 3 hours, 7 minutes and 30 seconds of thought based on basic calculations, scientists report. A new study examines the energy required to run a human brain and cost based on UK energy prices.
The brain is not as cramped as we thought Recent years have seen an upsurge of brain imaging, with renewed interest in techniques like electron microscopy, which allows us to observe and study the architecture of the brain in unprecedented detail. But at the same time, they have also revived old problems associated with how this delicate tissue is prepared before images can be collected. Using an innovative method, scientists now show that the brain is not as compact as we have thought all along.
Best of Our Blogs: August 11, 2015 I’ve felt the sharp pain of guilt in the past from soured relationships and professional failure. That hardly compares however, with the amount of guilt I’ve experienced being a parent. But every time I get to that deep, dark place, I remember something someone told me once. … ...
Emotional Healing             Six Ways Art Therapy Helps Some things are difficult to express in words; trauma, difficult feeling, feelings of ambivalence, or conflicting and confusing emotions … ...
Will doctors soon be prescribing video games for mental health? Video games focused on multitasking could have a positive effect on executive brain function.
No differences between lonely and nonlonely people’s attention to negative social info Researchers from the Netherlands recently examined loneliness to see if it affected how much attention people pay to negative social information like sad or angry faces.  The findings of this study were released in April 2015 in PLoS ONE.  Their findings showed no differences between lonely and nonlonely people in terms of how much attention [...] The post No differences between lonely and nonlonely people’s attention to negative social info appeared first on PsyPost.
Daydream believers: Social daydreaming can alleviate loneliness, study finds While loneliness causes negative effects on the mood and mind of an individual, it is also thought to be an adaptive emotion. Loneliness motivates people to reconnect socially, and therefore promotes species survival. Behaviors that promote social contact are the easiest way to remove feelings of loneliness, however, social connection is not always available to [...] The post Daydream believers: Social daydreaming can alleviate loneliness, study finds appeared first on PsyPost.
Promising drug for Parkinson’s disease: Study supports fast track to clinical trials A drug which has already been in use for decades to treat liver disease could be an effective treatment to slow down progression of Parkinson’s disease, scientists from the University of Sheffield have discovered. The pioneering research led by academics from the Sheffield Institute of Translational Neuroscience (SITraN), in collaboration with scientists from the University [...] The post Promising drug for Parkinson’s disease: Study supports fast track to clinical trials appeared first on PsyPost.
Sexting and Internet safety climb top 10 list of child health concerns With more kids online and using cell phones at increasingly younger ages, two issues have quickly climbed higher on the public’s list of major health concerns for children across the U.S: sexting and Internet safety. Compared with 2014, Internet safety rose from the eighth to the fourth biggest problem, ahead of school violence and smoking, [...] The post Sexting and Internet safety climb top 10 list of child health concerns appeared first on PsyPost.
Scientists use math to describe distinct memory processes Human memory is the result of different mental processes, such as learning, remembering and forgetting. However, these distinct processes cannot be observed directly. Researchers at the University of Basel now succeeded at describing them using computational models. The scientists were thus for the first time able to identify gene sets responsible for steering specific memory [...] The post Scientists use math to describe distinct memory processes appeared first on PsyPost.
How spiritual beliefs relate to cancer patients’ physical, mental, and social well-being Research reveals that most individuals with cancer have religious and spiritual beliefs, or derive comfort from religious and spiritual experiences. But what impact does this have on patients’ health? Recent analyses of all published studies on the topic–which included more than 44,000 patients–shed new light on the associations of religion and spirituality with cancer patients’ [...] The post How spiritual beliefs relate to cancer patients’ physical, mental, and social well-being appeared first on PsyPost.
Consistency is sexy: Study on attractiveness finds movement and shape must match Queen’s University professor Nikolaus Troje (Psychology, Biology, School of Computing) believes that it is the consistency of the whole appearance rather than the attractiveness of the parts. “Most previous work on attractiveness focused on the effect of isolated features.” says Dr. Troje. “The current study demonstrates how important it is that these features fit together [...] The post Consistency is sexy: Study on attractiveness finds movement and shape must match appeared first on PsyPost.
The Female Psychopath: Unique But Equally Dangerous A recent assessment with a 27-year old female psychopath offers a tragic reminder that female psychopaths can be just as deadly as their male counterparts.