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Gratitude So this is a follow up to my previous post. A Letter to my 23 Year Old Self. I wrote that letter two years ago. I told myself that true … ...
Scientists record activity of central nervous system for first time — and create these amazing videos There are around 100 billion neurons in the human brain, each connected to hundreds of neighbours. Analysing the link between neural activity in the brain, and the behaviour that causes it, could shed light on both areas. Now, a team of scientists has engineered imaging techniques to map neuronal firing in an entire nervous system [...] The post Scientists record activity of central nervous system for first time — and create these amazing videos appeared first on PsyPost.
How to Navigate the Perils of Creative Success The case for magic, fairies, and gratitude
5 Tips On Finding A New Therapist Finding a therapist is a daunting task. I mean, after all, you will be telling this man or woman very personal information. You may talk about your mother. You may … ...
Researchers call for more examination of music therapy Psychological trauma is defined by the DSM as “‘actual or threatened death, serious injury or sexual violence,’ whether personally experienced or witnessed, or experienced vicariously.” Three key aspects are prevalent in trauma: shock, wound, and a lasting effect. Untreated trauma has a negative effect on attention, memory, and cognition. Effective means of working through trauma [...] The post Researchers call for more examination of music therapy appeared first on PsyPost.
New, rapid dementia screening tool rivals ‘gold standard’ clinical evaluations Determining whether or not an individual has dementia and to what degree is a long and laborious process that can take an experienced professional such as a clinician about four to five hours to administer, interpret and score the test results. A leading neuroscientist at Florida Atlantic University has developed a way for a layperson [...] The post New, rapid dementia screening tool rivals ‘gold standard’ clinical evaluations appeared first on PsyPost.
Unravelling the mysteries of sleep: How the brain ‘sees’ dreams We’ve known for some time that our eyes move around during the dreaming phase of sleep, much like when we’re awake and looking at a visual scene. The phase of sleep is called rapid eye movement sleep, or REM sleep. New research, published today in the journal Nature Communications, shows brain activity during the dreaming [...] The post Unravelling the mysteries of sleep: How the brain ‘sees’ dreams appeared first on PsyPost.
Brain plasticity after vision loss has an ‘on-off switch’ KU Leuven biologists have discovered a molecular on-off switch that controls how a mouse brain responds to vision loss. When the switch is on, the loss of sight in one eye will be compensated by the other eye, but also by tactile input from the whiskers. When the switch is off, only the other eye [...] The post Brain plasticity after vision loss has an ‘on-off switch’ appeared first on PsyPost.
Science-backed brain game eases distraction and anxiety Researchers have created a surprisingly simple yet targeted brain game that reduces anxiety by helping people focus in an increasingly distracting world. In a study led by Michigan State University’s Jason Moser, anxious college students who completed a video game-like exercise that involved identifying shapes stayed more focused and showed less anxiety. Anxiety disorders are [...] The post Science-backed brain game eases distraction and anxiety appeared first on PsyPost.
Breakthrough in our understanding of cellular ‘marriage-broker’ protein Scientists at the Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital -The Neuro, at McGill University and the McGill University Health Centre, have made a breakthrough in understanding an important protein that appears to act as a kind of cellular “marriage broker.” The protein called Netrin1 brings cells together and maintains their healthy relationships. Netrin1 plays an essential [...] The post Breakthrough in our understanding of cellular ‘marriage-broker’ protein appeared first on PsyPost.
Antidepressant drug trials criteria not generalizable Mark Zimmerman, M.D., a clinical researcher at Rhode Island Hospital, and his team analyzed the criteria used in antidepressant efficacy studies (AETs) and learned that the inclusion/exclusion criteria for AETs have narrowed over the past five years so that the most patients are excluded. The research was published today in Mayo Clinic Proceedings. “The inclusion/exclusion [...] The post Antidepressant drug trials criteria not generalizable appeared first on PsyPost.
Newly discovered brain network recognizes what's new, what's familiar A novel learning and memory brain network has been discovered that processes incoming information based on whether it's something we've experienced previously or is deemed to be altogether new and unknown, helping us recognize, for instance, whether the face before us is that of a familiar friend or a complete stranger.
Study links insulin resistance with language problems in women Insulin resistance -- one of the hallmarks of type 2 diabetes -- is associated with language problems (a lack of verbal fluency) in women, a sign of cognitive decline associated with dementia, research that was conducted on both men and women indicates.
Adult IQ of very premature babies can be predicted by the age of two Research from the University of Warwick indicates that the IQ of adults born very premature or of very low birth weight can be predicted when they are just a toddler. The study was led by psychology researcher Professor Dieter Wolke. Previous studies have linked very premature birth and very low birth weight with impaired cognitive [...] The post Adult IQ of very premature babies can be predicted by the age of two appeared first on PsyPost.
5 Self-Control Strategies for Students In my summer class, Making and Breaking Habits, we brainstormed a list of self-control strategies, including: Don’t study in your bedroom! Yes, it’s private, but it’s also full of temptations … ...
Neurons’ broken machinery piles up in ALS A healthy motor neuron needs to transport its damaged components from the nerve-muscle connection all the way back to the cell body in the spinal cord. If it cannot, the defective components pile up and the cell becomes sick and dies. Researchers at the NIH’s National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) have learned [...] The post Neurons’ broken machinery piles up in ALS appeared first on PsyPost.
What Shoppers Should Know About Charm Prices Charm prices (prices that end with the digit 9) are used by retailers because they encourage purchases. In this article, I will explain why charm pricing works and discuss four ways in which shoppers can minimize the effects of charm prices on their buying behavior.
Social Exhaustion: Avoiding Introvert Burnout Some people derive energy from being with others. These are extroverts. To introverts they seem to rule the world with their easy charm and ability to small talk just about anyone. An introvert doesn’t derive energy from other humans. In fact, socialization exhausts the introvert, … ...
Newly discovered brain network recognizes what’s new, what’s familiar One of the more heartbreaking realities of Alzheimer’s is the moment when a loved one struggling with the disease no longer fully recognizes a family member or close friend who is caring for them. Now, new research from Washington University in St. Louis has identified a novel learning and memory brain network that processes incoming [...] The post Newly discovered brain network recognizes what’s new, what’s familiar appeared first on PsyPost.
5 Ways We Argue With Our Emotions Of all the ways we argue with each other, have you ever thought you might be arguing with yourself and your feelings too? One of the biggest ways we contribute … ...