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Do American adolescents approve of marijuana? Groundbreaking research published in The American Journal of Drug and Alcohol Abuse suggests that adolescents have become less likely to approve of and use marijuana over the last decade when compared to young adults. This is coming during a time where a majority of Americans support the full legalization of marijuana, according to a 2013 [...] The post Do American adolescents approve of marijuana? appeared first on PsyPost.
Study finds association between energy drinks and traumatic brain injury in teens Teens who reported a traumatic brain injury in the past year were seven times more likely to have consumed at least five energy drinks in the past week than those without a history of TBI, according to a study published today in PLOS ONE. Researchers also found that teens who reported sustaining a TBI within the [...] The post Study finds association between energy drinks and traumatic brain injury in teens appeared first on PsyPost.
The big sleep: Science is waking up to the curious story of narcolepsy Perhaps because we all need sleep, we have an enduring interest in tales of people who sleep continuously or cannot stay awake – popular characters such as Sleeping Beauty and Rip Van Winkle are just two examples. Totally somnolent characters in films, such as Rat Race (2001), Moulin Rouge! (2001) or Deuce Bigalow: Male Gigolo [...] The post The big sleep: Science is waking up to the curious story of narcolepsy appeared first on PsyPost.
Not all rhythmic skills are related, which may have implications for language ability Tapping to a beat and remembering rhythms may not be related skills, which may also have implications for language ability, according to a study published September 16, 2015 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Adam Tierney and Nina Kraus from Northwestern University. Rhythms, or patterns of sound and silence in time, may play a [...] The post Not all rhythmic skills are related, which may have implications for language ability appeared first on PsyPost.
Study finds people’s conservative and liberal traits show up in their Twitter vocabulary A study of nearly a million tweets from over 10,000 Twitter users has found that liberals swear more, conservatives are more likely to talk about religion, and liberals use more individual words like ‘me’ while conservatives opt more for the group-oriented ‘us.’ Researchers from Queen Mary University of London (QMUL) studied tweets sent between 15 [...] The post Study finds people’s conservative and liberal traits show up in their Twitter vocabulary appeared first on PsyPost.
Crime ties are relative in youth offenders’ substance abuse A new UT Dallas study has found that having family or friends involved in crime was the best predictor of whether a youth offender would become a long-term marijuana user or heavy drinker. The study was the result of interdisciplinary collaboration by Dr. Alex Piquero, associate dean of graduate programs and Ashbel Smith Professor of [...] The post Crime ties are relative in youth offenders’ substance abuse appeared first on PsyPost.
Study discovers what people find ‘essential’ in a long-term romantic partner Chapman University has published research on what people find “desirable” and “essential” in a long-term partner based on two of the largest national studies of mate preferences ever conducted. This research, published in Personality and Individual Differences, supports the long-held belief that people with desirable traits have a stronger “bargaining hand” and can be more [...] The post Study discovers what people find ‘essential’ in a long-term romantic partner appeared first on PsyPost.
Three Steps to Put Your Motivation on Overdrive   There are many ways we try to motivate ourselves. We add incentives, promise ourselves rewards, and sometimes even use positive self-statements. But when it comes to motivation there are … ...
The Favorite Child I have a sister, well a half-sister to be exact. She is about six years younger than me and was born right after my mother married my stepfather. And she … ...
The Science Behind PTSD Symptoms: How Trauma Changes The... After any type of trauma (from combat to car accidents, natural disasters to domestic violence, sexual assault to child abuse), the brain and body change. Every cell records memories and every embedded, trauma-related neuropathway has the opportunity to repeatedly reactivate. Sometimes the alterations these imprints … ...
6 Things You Probably Don’t Know About Bipolar Disorder... According to NAMI (the National Alliance on Mental Illness).more than 10 million people have bipolar disorder . How much do you know about it? If you’re like most people, you probably … ...
Rapamycin prevents Parkinson’s in mouse model of incurable neurodegenerative disease Rapamycin, an FDA-approved drug that extends lifespan in several species, prevented Parkinson’s disease (PD) in middle-age mice that were genetically fated to develop the incurable neurodegenerative motor disease that affects as many as one million Americans. While the rapamycin did great things for the mice, scientists in the Andersen lab at the Buck Institute also [...] The post Rapamycin prevents Parkinson’s in mouse model of incurable neurodegenerative disease appeared first on PsyPost.
Five tips on how to talk to kids about dementia “Why does Grandpa keep forgetting my name? Why does Mum do silly things like put salt in my hot chocolate?” With 900,000 Australians expected to be living with dementia by 2050, these are the types of questions more and more children will be asking as they come to know someone living with dementia. But are [...] The post Five tips on how to talk to kids about dementia appeared first on PsyPost.
Pay a Coach or Therapist by the RESULT? What if life coaches and therapists only got paid by the RESULT? For example, if you agree that you got a significant AHA moment during a session, then you pay. … ...
Uniquely human brain region orchestrates punishment decisions Humans are unique among social creatures in their willingness to bear personal costs to punish those who have harmed others. A study published September 16 in Neuron reveals new insights into our unparalleled sense of justice, specifically, the precise role of the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC)–one of the most recently evolved regions in the human [...] The post Uniquely human brain region orchestrates punishment decisions appeared first on PsyPost.
Criminals acquire guns through social connections Criminals are far more likely to acquire guns from family and acquaintances than by theft, according to new studies by researchers at Duke University and the University of Chicago. “There are a number of myths about how criminals get their guns, such as most of them are stolen or come from dirty dealers. We didn’t [...] The post Criminals acquire guns through social connections appeared first on PsyPost.
Holding out for ‘the one’ makes evolutionary sense, suggests lovebirds study Most of us have spent a considerable part of our life looking for true love – our perfect match. The search for an ideal partner isn’t exclusive to humans, many animals do it too. But from an evolutionary perspective it is not actually clear why we couple up at all. Why spend time and effort [...] The post Holding out for ‘the one’ makes evolutionary sense, suggests lovebirds study appeared first on PsyPost.
Twin study suggests genetic factors contribute to insomnia in adults A new study of twins suggests that insomnia in adults is partially explained by genetic factors, and this heritability is higher in females than in males. Results show that the genetic influences on insomnia symptoms in adults were substantial and largely stable over time while differing significantly by sex. In the longitudinal model, the estimated [...] The post Twin study suggests genetic factors contribute to insomnia in adults appeared first on PsyPost.
Alzheimer’s disease consists of 3 distinct subtypes, according to UCLA study Alzheimer’s disease, long thought to be a single disease, really consists of three distinct subtypes, according to a UCLA study. The finding could lead to more highly targeted research and, eventually, new treatments for the debilitating neurological disorder, which robs people of their memories. The study further found that one of the three variations, the [...] The post Alzheimer’s disease consists of 3 distinct subtypes, according to UCLA study appeared first on PsyPost.
Association between energy drinks, traumatic brain injury in teens Teens who reported a traumatic brain injury in the past year were seven times more likely to have consumed at least five energy drinks in the past week than those without a history of TBI, according to a study.