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New method to measure artery stiffness in the human brain A non-invasive method to measure vascular compliance, or how stiff an artery is, in the human brain has been revealed by scientists. This finding may have ramifications for preventing stroke and the early diagnoses of Alzheimer’s disease.
Why Study Coincidences? Part 2 Meaningful coincidences can jolt us into examining our own minds and our relationship with the world in which our minds are immersed.
The Future of Standardized Testing? In science fiction novel Ender’s Game, the talent and personality of each battle school student is adaptively assessed by the Mind Game, tailored to their interests and individuality. The game was used, in part, to select Ender Wiggin as the young commander who would save the world. What can this teach us about the future of testing?
Mercury In Retrograde Vs. Yom Kippur There has to be a balance of healthy self-esteem and personal responsibility....
I think I can, I think I can… Think you can’t lose weight, that it’s all out of your control? Well, you’re right. But if you think you are in the driver’s seat when it comes to losing … ...
A Child Therapist’s Perspective on Spanking So I came across this post on Facebook the other day (I always get good blog ideas when something on Facebook rubs me the wrong way), and it was one of those little e-card pictures that are everywhere. On the picture it said, “I was … ...
Nearly a quarter of women report sexual assault in college A new survey of college students, one of the largest ever focusing on sexual assault and sexual misconduct, has reignited the debate over just how big a problem sexual assault on campus really is.
5 Reasons Why Poverty Reduces Self-Control Bad choices can certainly be a factor in poverty. But just because someone makes bad choices doesn’t mean they lack virtue or have no self-control.
Feeling anxious? Check your orbitofrontal cortex and cultivate your optimism A new study links anxiety, a brain structure called the orbitofrontal cortex, and optimism, finding that healthy adults who have larger OFCs tend to be more optimistic and less anxious. The new analysis, reported in the journal Social, Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience, offers the first evidence that optimism plays a mediating role in the relationship [...] The post Feeling anxious? Check your orbitofrontal cortex and cultivate your optimism appeared first on PsyPost.
Hell hath no fury like a female superhero scorned (by fans) The devoted followers of comic book heroes are diversifying beyond the likes of Sheldon, Leonard, Raj and Howard as depicted on the CBS Network’s “The Big Bang Theory.” Rebecca Borah, a pop culture researcher and associate professor of English at the University of Cincinnati, says that’s partly what caused the Internet to “Hulk out” after [...] The post Hell hath no fury like a female superhero scorned (by fans) appeared first on PsyPost.
Genetic analysis supports prediction that spontaneous rare mutations cause half of autism A team led by researchers at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory (CSHL) this week published in PNAS a new analysis of data on the genetics of autism spectrum disorder (ASD). One commonly held theory is that autism results from the chance combinations of commonly occurring gene mutations, which are otherwise harmless. But the authors’ work provides [...] The post Genetic analysis supports prediction that spontaneous rare mutations cause half of autism appeared first on PsyPost.
Scientists identify key morphine regulator that may reduce risk of pain-killer abuse Once used in the 18th century as currency to reverse the trade imbalance between China and Britain, morphine and its pain-killing qualities have been misunderstood (and misused) almost continually ever since. The drug works its euphoric effect by acting on a specific protein that has been part of vertebrate anatomy for nearly a half-billion years. [...] The post Scientists identify key morphine regulator that may reduce risk of pain-killer abuse appeared first on PsyPost.
Researchers find biomarker for autism that may aid diagnostics By identifying a key signaling defect within a specific membrane structure in all cells, University of California, Irvine researchers believe, they have found both a possible reliable biomarker for diagnosing certain forms of autism and a potential therapeutic target. Dr. J. Jay Gargus, Ian Parker and colleagues at the UCI Center for Autism Research & [...] The post Researchers find biomarker for autism that may aid diagnostics appeared first on PsyPost.
‘Mind-reading’ kids are more discriminating learners To learn about the world around them, young children depend on information provided by others. But that’s not always the best strategy: kids will sometimes take everything grown-ups say at face value, even if they’re unreliable. New research shows that children are not as gullible as we might think — and that’s especially true for [...] The post ‘Mind-reading’ kids are more discriminating learners appeared first on PsyPost.
Looking to brain science for clues to better writing Good writing isn’t an art, a University of Florida researcher says — it’s a science. A new book by Yellowlees Douglas, an associate professor of management communication at the University of Florida, overturns more than a century of thinking about writing. The Reader’s Brain: How Neuroscience Can Make You a Better Writer — published this [...] The post Looking to brain science for clues to better writing appeared first on PsyPost.
Conflict-related brain activity may indicate psychosis risk Researchers led by Bradley S. Peterson, MD, director of the Institute for the Developing Mind at Children’s Hospital Los Angeles, have shown that lower levels of conflict-related brain activity are associated with a higher risk for later psychosis. The study, in conjunction with colleagues at Columbia University, is available via PubMed in advance of publication [...] The post Conflict-related brain activity may indicate psychosis risk appeared first on PsyPost.
Married With Children . . . and Divorced Friends It can be hard for married parents to reassure their own children about the permanence of marriage, given the high divorce rate and other changes in the "typical" American family. Parents can talk to their children about the durability of family. Those of us in positive post-marriage relationships can help spread of sense of stability within our communities.
A Therapist’s Guide to Clinical Consultation in Private Practice... Thanks to Rebecca Wong, LCSW for this guest post! Where do you get the professional advice you really need? Being a therapist in private practice can be isolating. You spend your workdays seeing client after client. Between sessions, you try to connect with colleagues. You … ...
Feeling anxious? Check your orbitofrontal cortex, cultivate your optimism A new study links anxiety, a brain structure called the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC), and optimism, finding that healthy adults who have larger OFCs tend to be more optimistic and less anxious.
It’s not a lack of self-control that keeps people poor When considering poverty, our national conversation tends to overlook systemic causes. Instead, we often blame the poor for their poverty. Commentators echo the claim that people are poor because they have bad self-control and therefore make nearsighted choices. But psychology research says the opposite might be the case: poverty makes it hard for people to [...] The post It’s not a lack of self-control that keeps people poor appeared first on PsyPost.