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The greater a country’s gender equality in employment, the higher its homicide rate The greater a country’s gender equality when it comes to employment, the higher the overall homicide rate, according to a Baylor University study of 146 countries. “The finding does not mean that gender equality in employment increases homicide rates, but there is a correspondence,” said sociologist Katie Corcoran, Ph.D. “What remains uncertain is the ‘why’ [...] The post The greater a country’s gender equality in employment, the higher its homicide rate appeared first on PsyPost.
10 Quotes for Mindful Living Last year when my wife Stefanie Goldstein, PhD and I started The Center for Mindful Living in Los Angeles, our intention was to provide a space for people to integrate … ...
How Media Marketing Can Build Your Practice: Podcast Interview... One of my favorite colleagues and friends, Joe Sanok from Practice of the Practice, invited me to join him for a podcast interview on how to get media coverage for your private practice and maximize it to build your online presence, build trust with potential … ...
The Purpose of Emotions as Told through ‘Inside Out’... I was a little skeptical of the animated feature film “Inside Out” when I first met Joy. “Not another lesson about replacing everything with positivity,” I thought during the first part of the movie. Her dazzling blue hair, her incessant happy attitude, and her “go-get-‘er” … ...
Glitter from silver lights up Alzheimer’s dark secrets Scientists have caught a glimpse of the elusive toxic form of the Alzheimer’s molecule, during its attempt to bore into the outer covering of a cell decoy, using a new method involving laser light and fat-coated silver nano-particles. While the origin of Alzheimer’s Disease, one that robs the old of their memory, is still hotly [...] The post Glitter from silver lights up Alzheimer’s dark secrets appeared first on PsyPost.
Depressed people who turn to their smart phones for relief may only be making things worse Depressed people who turn to their smart phones for relief may only be making things worse. A team of researchers, that included the dean of Michigan State University’s College of Communication Arts and Sciences, found that people who substitute electronic interaction for the real-life human kind find little if any satisfaction. In a paper published [...] The post Depressed people who turn to their smart phones for relief may only be making things worse appeared first on PsyPost.
‘Lazy eye’ may bully the brain into altering its wiring Colorful and expressive, the eyes are central to the way people interact with each other, as well as take in their surroundings. That makes amblyopia — more commonly known as “lazy eye” — all the more obvious, but the physical manifestation of the most common cause of vision problems among children the world over is [...] The post ‘Lazy eye’ may bully the brain into altering its wiring appeared first on PsyPost.
Mental visual imaging training improves multiple sclerosis patients’ well-being Patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RR-MS), the most common form of the disease, often have deficits in two neuropsychological functions, autobiographical memory (AM) and episodic future thinking (EFT), which impact quality of life. In a new study published in Restorative Neurology and Neuroscience, researchers report that training RR-MS patients in mental visual imagery (MVI) can [...] The post Mental visual imaging training improves multiple sclerosis patients’ well-being appeared first on PsyPost.
Study uncovers the neuropsychological profiles of men who murder spouses, family Murderers who kill intimate partners and family members have a significantly different psychological and forensic profile from murderers who kill people they don’t know, reports a new Northwestern Medicine study that examined the demographics, psychiatric history and neuropsychology of these individuals. The new knowledge about murderers who commit what is called spontaneous domestic homicide — [...] The post Study uncovers the neuropsychological profiles of men who murder spouses, family appeared first on PsyPost.
Prison and the brain: What we know about deficits in executive functioning among inmates The results of a study published in Frontiers in Psychology earlier this year suggest that the executive functioning of prisoners may be impaired — especially that of recidivists, or repeat offenders. According to the study, more than 11 million people are currently imprisoned and recidivism rates in the United States are at an all-time high. The most [...] The post Prison and the brain: What we know about deficits in executive functioning among inmates appeared first on PsyPost.
Why Are Optimists Smiling? Are They Blind to Reality? Understanding a Person's Outlook on Life Through Early Recollections
Remarriage Can Be Scary While remarried couples can face difficulties due to their past, bringing children into the mix adds another layer of challenges that the couple must overcome. Blending families are fast becoming … ...
Why Me? It is the title of my bestselling book and the question so many of us who have been hurt ask on a daily basis.  We sit and look at “normal” … ...
The Life-Changing Magic of Helping Kids Get Organized Co-parenting in two homes can increase chaos. Help your kids develop organizational skills that will help them now and in the future.
Personal Space: What Our Distance Communicates You may not be conscious of the kind of body language signals you send out, yet unconsciously you are able to interpret the body language of others. You rely on … ...
Doing Good Makes Life Meaningful How putting the needs of others may make your life more meaningful
Why Narcissists Try to Make You Feel Bad About Yourself It’s never pleasant to be the target of an insult. However, before you let an insulting remark get the better of you, stop and consider who’s doing the insulting. It’s likely that it’s just a narcissist, trying to feel better by making you feel bad.
Mindfulness Isn’t a Depression Cure-All A new study from the University of Oxford finds that mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT) is just as effective as antidepressants for preventing a relapse of depression. In MBCT, a person learns to pay closer attention to the present moment and to let go of the … ...
'Lazy eye' may bully the brain into altering its wiring As the brain develops its preference for the dominant eye's input, it alters its connections to the weaker eye, according to a new study.
How Positive Change Can Surprise You I got back in touch with a close friend from college. She was the type of girl who wore all black and listened to Belle and Sebastian. She had an … ...