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Study finds some psychopaths have enhanced recognition of others’ emotions Recent research published in the Scandinavian Journal of Psychology suggests that all psychopaths may not be created equal when it comes to recognizing emotions in others. The study, which targeted 92 Norwegian prisoners, was comprised of three assessments: a self-report survey of psychopathy, a clinical assessment of psychopathy, and a task assessing emotional recognition, also [...] The post Study finds some psychopaths have enhanced recognition of others’ emotions appeared first on PsyPost.
How the mind sharpens the senses: Study finds Zen meditation improves sense of touch A study conducted with experienced scholars of Zen-Meditation shows that mental focussing can induce learning mechanisms, similar to physical training. Researchers at the Ruhr-University Bochum and the Ludwig-Maximilians-University München discovered this phenomenon during a scientifically monitored meditation retreat. The journal Scientific Reports, from the makers of Nature, has now published their new findings on the [...] The post How the mind sharpens the senses: Study finds Zen meditation improves sense of touch appeared first on PsyPost.
Difficulty making good choices is one of the factors that make certain people vulnerable to suicide Not even close to every person who faces challenges or lives with severe depression commits suicide. Some people are more vulnerable than others. A series of studies has shown that the way in which a person makes decisions is among the main factors that determines whether that person is protected from or vulnerable to suicide. [...] The post Difficulty making good choices is one of the factors that make certain people vulnerable to suicide appeared first on PsyPost.
To get girls more interested in computer science, make classrooms less ‘geeky’ Women lag behind men in the lucrative computer science and technology industries, and one of the possible contributors to this disparity is that they’re less likely to enroll in introductory computer science courses. A new study of 270 high school students shows that three times as many girls were interested in enrolling in a computer [...] The post To get girls more interested in computer science, make classrooms less ‘geeky’ appeared first on PsyPost.
‘Brainbow’ reveals surprising data about visual connections in brain Neuroscientists know that some connections in the brain are pruned through neural development. Function gives rise to structure, according to the textbooks. But scientists at the Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute have discovered that the textbooks might be wrong. Their results were published today in Cell Reports. “Retinal neurons associated with vision generate connections in [...] The post ‘Brainbow’ reveals surprising data about visual connections in brain appeared first on PsyPost.
Four-day school week can improve academic performance, study finds Shortening the school week to four days has a positive impact on elementary school students’ academic performance in mathematics, according to researchers at Georgia State University and Montana State University. The study, published in the journal Education, Finance and Policy in July, analyzed the impact of a four-day school week on student achievement by comparing fourth-grade [...] The post Four-day school week can improve academic performance, study finds appeared first on PsyPost.
Degenerating neurons respond to gene therapy treatment for Alzheimer’s disease Degenerating neurons in patients with Alzheimer’s disease (AD) measurably responded to an experimental gene therapy in which nerve growth factor (NGF) was injected into their brains, report researchers at University of California, San Diego School of Medicine in the current issue of JAMA Neurology. The affected neurons displayed heightened growth, axonal sprouting and activation of [...] The post Degenerating neurons respond to gene therapy treatment for Alzheimer’s disease appeared first on PsyPost.
How Addiction Impacts The Family Addiction isn’t a solitary illness. This means that even though only one member of the family may have an addiction, each other member is affected by it. In this infographic by Change to Change, we are shown the roles that family members take on during addiction. Aside from the person who is struggling with the […]
One Way to Lose Weight: The Do More Good Principle One of the interesting things about losing a lot of weight is that everyone wants to know your secret. It is as if there were some magic potion that only a select few know about. When I was 275 pounds, I used to scour the … ...
7 Ways a Person Can Be Abused A bruise is not a requirement for proof of abusive behavior. There are many other ways a person can be abused. Abuse can be manipulation, exploitation, maltreatment, neglect, violence, cruelty, harm, hurt, ill-treatment, and exploitive. The seven ways it is manifested is through physical, mental, … ...
Post-Partum Disorders in African-American Women (Video) Video about African-American women and post-partum depression and psychosis....
Review of 100 published psychology studies finds only one-third are reliable — now what? The ability to repeat a study and find the same results twice is a prerequisite for building scientific knowledge. Replication allows us to ensure empirical findings are reliable and refines our understanding of when a finding occurs. It may surprise you to learn, then, that scientists do not often conduct – much less publish – [...] The post Review of 100 published psychology studies finds only one-third are reliable — now what? appeared first on PsyPost.
Creating Weekdays You Actually Enjoy, Part 2 On Monday, in this piece, I shared a few ideas on how we can create weekdays we enjoy. Many of us view the weekdays (days most of us are working) … ...
Free Webinar: Mindfulness-Based Recovery Coaching: Overcoming Attachments & Recovering... Join Psych Central host Zoë Kessler for a conversation with Michele Happe, MA. Michele graduated from California State University with a Master’s in Psychology. A licenced drug and alcohol counselor, in Michele began working with addicts and co-dependents. Michele also directed one of the first … ...
How to Have Fun Getting your CEUs As a mental health professional, the learning never stops. While I love continuing education, I also know that it can feel hard to fit in when you are seeing clients and running a business. Recently I have decided to make this process a whole lot … ...
A Good Method For Practicing SAT/ACT Reading Standardized tests require students to read with much greater attention to detail than they may be used to. Here’s one of the methods we use to train our students to … ...
Earn Your Title It seems pretty cut and dry doesn’t it?  You have a child; you clothe that child, feed that child, you make sure that that child has a roof over their … ...
5 More Creative Prompts to Shake Up Your Perspective Last week, in this piece, I shared five of my favorite prompts from Tanner Christensen’s new book The Creativity Challenge. These prompts focus on changing how we think about thinking. … ...
Surprised? Cholinergic neurons send broadcasts enabling us to learn from the unexpected Neuroscientists have discovered a set of cholinergic neurons in the basal forebrain that broadcast messages throughout the cerebral cortex, rapidly informing multiple distributed subregions of any surprising rewards or punishments -- what scientists call reinforcers. It's a way we learn from the unexpected.
Creative and neurotic: Is neuroticism fueled by overthinking? Psychologists have presented a new theory for why neurotic unhappiness and creativity go hand-in-hand. The authors argue that the part of the brain responsible for self-generated thought is highly active in neuroticism, which yields both of the trait's positives (e.g., creativity) and negatives (e.g., misery).