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Study finds police are better observers than ordinary civilians Dutch research shows that trained detectives of specialized observation teams are much better at registering details of a drug deal than ordinary civilians. Previous legal-psychological research revealed no relevant differences in observation skills between police professionals and civilians. The findings have been published in Legal and Criminological Psychology. Judges and juries often assume that police [...] The post Study finds police are better observers than ordinary civilians appeared first on PsyPost.
Aphantasia: Some people are born without the ability to visualize images If counting sheep is an abstract concept, or you are unable to visualise the faces of loved ones, you could have aphantasia – a newly defined condition to describe people who are born without a “mind’s eye”. Some people report a significant impact on their lives from being unable to visualise memories of their partners, [...] The post Aphantasia: Some people are born without the ability to visualize images appeared first on PsyPost.
The bane of your existence: Smartphones and ‘technostress’ If you feel stressed out by your smartphone, it might be down to your personality as well as your phone, a new study suggests. Writing in the journal Behaviour & Information Technology, Yu-Kang Lee and colleagues explored the relationship between four key personality traits, the types of phones people used and the levels of ‘technostress’ [...] The post The bane of your existence: Smartphones and ‘technostress’ appeared first on PsyPost.
Why Depression is So Difficult I’m not naive enough (at least I don’t think?) to think that I have the one reason that depression is such a difficult state of being. Depression has a different … ...
The One Thing to Remember to Beat Insomnia Cognitive-behavioral therapy for insomnia, or CBT-I, is a powerful non-drug treatment. Find out one of the main principles that underlies its effectiveness.
3 Ways to Increase Adult Happiness A man’s maturity consists in having found again the seriousness one had as a child, at play. ~ Friedrich Nietzsche (1844 – 1900) A number of years ago, I stayed up till 1:30 in the morning watching a long lineup of comics at The Comedy … ...
Bright screens at night imperil sleep of young teens A new study has an important implication for tweens and young teens as they head back to school: Taking a gadget to bed could really hurt their sleep. Enough light exposure at night can keep anyone from falling asleep as quickly as they otherwise would have. But the new research, published online in the Journal [...] The post Bright screens at night imperil sleep of young teens appeared first on PsyPost.
The great escape: Why awareness of mortality can be bad for health The great escape: why awareness of our own mortality can be bad for our health People with low self-esteem use a variety of escape mechanisms to avoid thinking about their own mortality, new research reveals. Researchers led by Dr Arnaud Wisman, of the University of Kent’s School of Psychology, found evidence in five studies that [...] The post The great escape: Why awareness of mortality can be bad for health appeared first on PsyPost.
Neurobiology — tuning of timing in auditory axons An LMU team has shown that the axons of auditory neurons in the brainstem which respond to low and high-frequency sounds differ in their morphology, and that these variations correlate with differences in the speed of signal conduction. As a rule, the axons (i.e. signal-transmitting fibers) of the neurons in the central nervous systems of [...] The post Neurobiology — tuning of timing in auditory axons appeared first on PsyPost.
Self-control saps memory: Cancelling an intended action seems to weaken memory You’re driving on a busy road and you intend to switch lanes when you suddenly realize that there’s a car in your blind spot. You have to put a stop to your lane change — and quickly. A new study by Duke University researchers suggests that this type of scenario makes a person less likely [...] The post Self-control saps memory: Cancelling an intended action seems to weaken memory appeared first on PsyPost.
Awareness of memory loss may decline two-three years before dementia onset People who will develop dementia may begin to lose awareness of their memory problems two to three years before the actual onset of the disease, according to a new study. The study also found that several dementia-related brain changes, or pathologies, are associated with the decline in memory awareness.
Survivors of childhood cancer have high-risk of recurrent stroke A new study shows that childhood cancer survivors suffering one stroke have double the risk of suffering a second stroke, when compared with non-cancer stroke survivors.
Researchers reveal how a common mutation causes neurodegenerative disease Researchers have determined how the most common gene mutation in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD) disrupts normal cell function, providing insight likely to advance efforts to develop targeted therapies for these brain diseases. Scientists from the University of Massachusetts Medical School (UMMS) and St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital led the research, which [...] The post Researchers reveal how a common mutation causes neurodegenerative disease appeared first on PsyPost.
Fear-Mongering, Bullies and Jealousy If I had a dollar for every time one of my practice-builders was discouraged by someone feeling stuck in their own agency job, I’d have a lot of dollars. Maybe we should start fining those naysayers a negativity tax. I’ve had people announce that they … ...
Drumming and Brainwaves and Creativity There are many personal reports and research studies on how meditation can help people be more creative. For example, In his post 5 Keys To Freeing Up Creativity From David … ...
Client-Centered Therapy Non-directive therapy is often misunderstood as sloppy, unstructured, and passive, but actually it means very actively following the direction of the client, carefully, closely, and creatively.
Self-control saps memory, study says You're about to switch lanes on a busy road when you realize there's a car in your blind spot. You have to put a stop to your lane change -- and quickly. A new study suggests that this type of scenario makes a person less likely to remember what halted the action -- for example, the make and model of the car in the blind spot.
Here We Goooo! The Ol’ Liberal-Conservative Debate Who's smarter, kinder, and more moral: Liberals or Conservatives? Seven must-read links....
Eating Healthy Now May Prevent Dementia Later Visiting my 87-year-old mother every day at her nursing home is a bittersweet affair. On one hand, I enjoy talking with her and providing her some comfort, in the form … ...
Want More Meaning in Your Life? Take These Two Steps   When what we are doing has a larger purpose, engages our unique strengths, and is fulfilling for us, we can say we have meaning. And meaning is a universal … ...