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Smh, mayne: How #hashtags and symbols affect language on Twitter Despite all the shortened words and slang seen on Twitter, it turns out that people follow many of the same communication etiquette rules on social media as they do in speech. Research from the Georgia Institute of Technology shows that when tweeters use hashtags — a practice that can enable messages to reach more people [...] The post Smh, mayne: How #hashtags and symbols affect language on Twitter appeared first on PsyPost.
Study with ‘never-smokers’ sheds light on the earliest stages of nicotine dependence In a study with 18 adults who had never smoked, scientists at Johns Hopkins report they have demonstrated one of the earliest steps — nicotine “reinforcement” — in the process of addiction, and shown that some people are far more vulnerable to nicotine addiction than others. In a summary of the research, published online Sept. [...] The post Study with ‘never-smokers’ sheds light on the earliest stages of nicotine dependence appeared first on PsyPost.
Premenstrual dysphoric disorder — review looks at treatment effectiveness Premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD) is a severe form of premenstrual syndrome that causes major disruption in several areas of life for many women. Many treatment options have been proposed, but which are most effective? A comprehensive review of the evidence, including specific treatment guidelines, is presented in the September Journal of Psychiatric Practice, published by [...] The post Premenstrual dysphoric disorder — review looks at treatment effectiveness appeared first on PsyPost.
Racial discrimination during adolescence has a lasting effect on the body In both blacks and whites, everyday feelings of discrimination can mess with the body’s levels of the primary stress hormone, cortisol, new research suggests. In African-Americans, however, the negative effects of perceived discrimination on cortisol are stronger than in whites, according to the study, one of the first to look at the biological response to [...] The post Racial discrimination during adolescence has a lasting effect on the body appeared first on PsyPost.
External brain stimulation temporarily improves motor symptoms in people with Parkinson’s People with Parkinson’s disease (PD) tend to slow down and decrease the intensity of their movements even though many retain the ability to move more quickly and forcefully. Now, in proof-of-concept experiments with “joysticks” that measure force, a team of Johns Hopkins scientists report evidence that the slowdown likely arises from the brain’s “cost/benefit analysis,” [...] The post External brain stimulation temporarily improves motor symptoms in people with Parkinson’s appeared first on PsyPost.
Can black Republicans win black votes? Not likely, study finds Are black voters more likely to vote for black candidates, regardless of political party affiliation? A new study by a University of Cincinnati researcher presents discouraging news for Republican leaders hoping to win over this Democratic stronghold by nominating black Republican candidates for political offices. “There are some very successful African-American Republicans, but those folks [...] The post Can black Republicans win black votes? Not likely, study finds appeared first on PsyPost.
If Only One-third of Published Psychology Research is Reliable, Now What? The ability to repeat a study and find the same results twice is a prerequisite for building scientific knowledge. It may surprise you to learn, then, that scientists do not often conduct—much less publish—attempted replications of existing studies. ...
Therapy, the Effective Kind Are Americans getting the mental health treatment they need?
Coming Out of the Mental Illness Closet I am mentally ill. It sounds a bit shocking to hear myself say that. Such a notion had never even occurred to me, until recently. My unexamined assumption was that mentally ill people were the ones living in institutions, ranting and raving and disrobing in public. They were schizophrenic, psychotic, and secured in lockdown wards.
Triggers that Shatter Your Self-Compassion Yesterday wasn’t a very productive day for me. I felt scattered. My attention jumped from one distraction to another to another. And I ended up working at night, which ate … ...
Use Math Tests to Teach Executive Function The point of taking a test is to find out what you know and what you still need to work on. Tests are powerful learning tools! It’s also important for … ...
5 Zinger Questions To Transform Your Romantic Relationship... Sometimes relationships can get a positive boost by asking penetrating questions. These are not necessarily questions to live by. Yet, they are important to understand. The zinger questions can shed … ...
Secrets of La Pura Vida Costa Rica's abundant natural beauty - a source of happiness?
Easy explanations for life's inequities lead to support for the status quo What if you heard that on planet Teeku, the Blarks were a lot richer than the Orps, and you had to guess why? In a new study, participants were asked to select from several potential explanations for this fictional disparity. A majority focused on inherent traits of the Blarks and Orps (maybe the Blarks were smarter, or better workers than the Orps), rather than on external factors.
Is Spanking Bad for Children and Families? Since 1997 studies have consistently shown that spanking doesn’t have much of a positive effect on behavior. Meanwhile, it can harm parent-child communication and can lead a child into patterns of anxiety and aggression. So why do so many of us do it? What "no harm" and "good for them in the long run" myths have we bought into?
Brain plasticity in leprosy A new study shows that nerve damage caused by leprosy is associated to changes in the brain of patients.
Learning To Love Yourself I just had the most amazing weekend with my siblings and their families. We clocked hours by the fire reminiscing about our childhood while we watched all of our children … ...
Does psychosis play a role in extreme acts of violence? Mass shootings across the United States continue to stun and mystify, and researchers using data from the MacArthur Violence Risk Assessment Study, sought to understand how psychosis may play a role in extreme acts of violence. The research, published in Clinical Psychological Science suggests that psychosis plays a role in acts of extreme violence, but [...] The post Does psychosis play a role in extreme acts of violence? appeared first on PsyPost.
Could Donald Trump Make Us More Informed? Donald Trump, the stock market, and being irrational. Behavioral economics tells us that having "The Donald" in the race could actually make us more informed.
Want to Feel Successful? Try This Simple Formula   The truth is there is nothing simple about success. Peruse the shelves of any self-help section and you will find a multitude of different theories about just what it … ...