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60+ Relationship Tips for Intimacy We all want intimacy with our partner, but at times it can be hard to cultivate. In this new blog from Australian Counselling, 20 therapists, including our own Colleen Morris, share their tips for creating intimacy with your partner. From simple, minute details, to larger than life ideas, this list will give you the inspiration […]
Eating a lot of fish may help curb depression risk -- at least in Europe Eating a lot of fish may help curb the risk of depression -- at least in Europe -- suggests a pooled analysis of the available evidence. Depression affects an estimated 350 million people worldwide, and is projected to become the second leading cause of ill health by 2020.
8 Amazing Traits of Healthy, Submissive People In the world there is nothing more submissive and weak than water. Yet for attacking that which is hard and strong nothing can surpass it.   ~Lao Tzu This post … ...
Real crisis in psychology isn’t that studies don’t replicate, but that we usually don’t even try Psychology is still digesting the implications of a large study published last month, in which a team led by University of Virginia’s Brian Nosek repeated 100 psychological experiments and found that only 36% of originally “significant” (in the statistical sense) results were replicated. Commentators are divided over how much to worry about the news. Some [...] The post Real crisis in psychology isn’t that studies don’t replicate, but that we usually don’t even try appeared first on PsyPost.
Chemical messengers: How hormones help us sleep When it comes to motives for getting a good night’s sleep we don’t usually think about our body’s hormones. But sleep allows many of our hormones to replenish so we have the optimal energy, immunity, appetite and coping ability to face the day’s highs and lows. The activities we do during the day – from [...] The post Chemical messengers: How hormones help us sleep appeared first on PsyPost.
What’s the psychology behind the belief that the world is fair? Life’s not fair! So why do we assume it is? Larisa Hussak, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Income inequality in America has been growing rapidly, and is expected to increase. While the widening wealth gap is a hot topic in the media and on the campaign trail, there’s quite a disconnect between the perceptions of [...] The post What’s the psychology behind the belief that the world is fair? appeared first on PsyPost.
Building Your Emotional Container After a long day you are finally sitting down to a candle-lit dinner with your wife, husband, or special someone. The kids are sleeping or being watched by a babysitter. The food is all prepared and smells great. All that’s left to do is sit … ...
Cultivate Your Creativity by Being Wrong As a child, one of my biggest fears was doing something wrong. I was terrified of making mistakes and saying (or writing) an incorrect answer. I was terrified of breaking … ...
Letting Go of Fear Once there was an octopus she would wrap her tentacles around firm, solid rocks to feel secure and comfortable. As she grew, the octopus ventured further out, exploring deeper water. … ...
Anxiety & Traveling Part I Well, I am off to a foreign country in three days for a family wedding and my anxiety level seems to have hit an all-time high. It is so bad … ...
Evidence for cognitive training efficacy in TBI Results of a randomized clinical trial of a cognitive intervention to improve learning and memory in individuals with traumatic brain injury have been published. The treatment protocol, the modified Story Memory Technique, was found to improve memory in adults with moderate to severe TBI, providing the first Class I evidence for the efficacy of this intervention in the TBI population.
6 Excuses People Make to Keep Drinking For most, drinking is something that is done on occasion, in moderation, and forgotten about in the interim. For others, because of a variety of factors that can include genetics, … ...
Are Dogs or Cats More Likely to Make Us Laugh? People who own pets laugh more frequently than people who do not, with dog owners and those who own cats and dogs, laughing more than those who own only cats. It is when our pet fails at something or does something unexpected that we are most likely to laugh.
Brain cells get tweaked 'on the go' A new molecular 'switch' has been discovered that controls the properties of neurons in response to changes in the activity of their neural network. The findings suggest that the 'hardware' in our brain is tuneable and could have implications that go far beyond basic neuroscience -- from informing education policy to developing new therapies for neurological disorders such as epilepsy.
Which Frozen Character Has Better Coping Skills? Frozen is one of the most popular animated movies of all time. It is ironic, however, that Anna, a role model of many strengths for children and youth (and adults) … ...
Depression study seeks to predict treatment response Treating depressed individuals and figuring out who will and won’t respond to antidepressants is mostly trial and error, but a new study may shed some light on predicting the response of a group of depressed individuals age 60 and older.
Neuroanatomical signature for schizophrenia found The right anterior insula of brain may play a role in schizophrenia as well as other Axis I disorders such as bipolar disorder, depression, etc. across ethnic groups despite differences in symptoms, suggest findings of a new study.
Major complication of Parkinson's therapy explained Researchers have discovered why long-term use of levodopa treatment commonly leads to a side effect that can be as debilitating as Parkinson's disease itself.
Problematic relationship: Small brain models distort contact intensity between neurons Even the most powerful computers in the world can only simulate one percent of the nerve cells due to memory constraints. For this reason, scientists have turned to downscaled models. However, this downscaling is problematic, as shown by a recent study.
Does Conditional Self-Acceptance Keep You From Being Happy? Do you have a tendency to disavow compliments? Deny credit if what you accomplished was done with minimal effort? Or might you attribute your successes more to luck than to social skills, intelligence, or innate gifts? . . . If any of these characterizations applies to you, you’re probably preventing yourself from experiencing what, personally, all of us most desire. . . .