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Alzheimer’s disease consists of 3 distinct subtypes, according to UCLA study Alzheimer’s disease, long thought to be a single disease, really consists of three distinct subtypes, according to a UCLA study. The finding could lead to more highly targeted research and, eventually, new treatments for the debilitating neurological disorder, which robs people of their memories. The study further found that one of the three variations, the [...] The post Alzheimer’s disease consists of 3 distinct subtypes, according to UCLA study appeared first on PsyPost.
Association between energy drinks, traumatic brain injury in teens Teens who reported a traumatic brain injury in the past year were seven times more likely to have consumed at least five energy drinks in the past week than those without a history of TBI, according to a study.
Applying the Concept of Radical Acceptance to Self-Acceptance... I’m writing an article for Psych Central about practicing radical acceptance, a key component of dialectical behavior therapy (DBT), created by psychologist Marsha Linehan, Ph.D. Radical acceptance is about accepting … ...
Stepparents – Back Away From the Ex! It may happen right away in the begin of your relationship with an innocent – “I should get to know the other parent” thought. Or it might be a bit … ...
Knowledge vs. Imagination in OCD Last month, researchers at the CIUSSS de l’Est-de-l’Île-de-Montréal offered some interesting new information — imagination may play a major role in the underlying processes of OCD. They found that people … ...
Bromance and Tribe Identity Women need to talk about relationships, while men would rather just live them.
How your brain decides blame and punishment, and how it can be changed Juries in criminal cases typically decide if someone is guilty, then a judge determines a suitable level of punishment. New research confirms that these two separate assessments of guilt and punishment -- though related -- are calculated in different parts of the brain. In fact, researchers have found that they can disrupt and change one decision without affecting the other.
Some evidence of link between stress, Alzheimer's disease discovered More evidence of a link between the brain's stress response and a protein related to Alzheimer's disease has been uncovered by a team of researchers. The research, conducted on a mouse model and in human cells, found that a stress-coping hormone released by the brain boosts the production of protein fragments.
New study reveals when cheaters are most likely to cheat Research that shows people are most likely to be dishonest for personal gain the closer they are to the end of something.
Spreading Coherence and Emotion Going back to the 1950s, social and cognitive psychologists noticed that people’s beliefs tend to become more coherent over time. For example, a couple buying a house might initially notice both the positive and negative elements of that house. If they decide they are not going to buy that house, they may start to focus on the negatives rather than the positives.
Why Do People Take Selfies In Emergencies? When a United Airlines flight made an emergency landing this summer due to medical situations on board, as the oxygen masks fell down, some passengers’ phone cameras went up. But psychologists say the instinct to snap a selfie in a near-death experience isn’t all narcissism—it’s also about survival and self-preservation....
How Little Kids Can Inspire Us to be in the Present Do you know what I find endearing about little kids? They exude such simplicity and innocence — such an aptitude to stay present. In life, we’re faced with distractions. Worrying about the future. Feeling pain from the past. And yet, whenever I interact with little … ...
The Belief That Inspires Healthy Eating and Weight Loss Study identifies belief that could be crucial to inspiring healthy eating and weight loss. » Continue reading: The Belief That Inspires Healthy Eating and Weight Loss
How Do Men Experience Eating Disorders? The behaviors that males who have eating disorders engage in may not always resemble the typical pattern of efforts to slim down observed in women’s disordered eating behavior.
Teaching Autistic Students: High School High school can be better or worse for autistic students than grade school. The good thing is that most teenagers are at least somewhat aware of what they like and … ...
'Stop Checking Your Smartphone!' Few people would say that their lives are worse because of mobile phones. However, in the scientific literature, excessive mobile phone use has been linked with self-reported dependence and addiction-like symptoms, sleep interference, financial problems, and dangerous use (phoning while driving). But can disordered mobile phone use be considered as an addiction?
Overcoming Infidelity in the Wake of the Ashley Madison... The recent breach of the Ashley Madison cheating website has affected many marriages and even allegedly led to two suicides. It has left many wondering, “Can a marriage be saved after an affair?” As a Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist, I believe it is possible … ...
Supplement Thought To Protect Brain Health Actually Does Not Contrary to popular belief, this supplement doesn't prevent cognitive decline. » Continue reading: Supplement Thought To Protect Brain Health Actually Does Not
Today I Love That It’s Still Summer "Bees and squirrels are wildly working away at gathering stores, and geese are holding flight school for the young, squawking displeasure at the chevrons, ragged but soon to be straight, as they decorate our sky."...
The Good Do-Gooders Do In Strangers Drowning, Larissa MacFarquhar tells the stories of a handful of altruists and reflects on the lives they have chosen to live. She examines changing attitudes toward altruism; adoption and kidney donation; Alcoholics Anonymous; a leprosy colony in Indian; and a "deaf workshop" in Japan; and the subsistence World Equity Budget that seeks equity among all people.