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Physical activity, sadness, and suicidality in bullied US adolescents A study to be published in the October 2015 issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry (JAACAP) reports that exercise for 4 or more days per week is associated with an approximate 23% reduction in both suicidal ideation and attempt in bullied adolescents in the U.S. Across the U.S., [...] The post Physical activity, sadness, and suicidality in bullied US adolescents appeared first on PsyPost.
Researchers identify neurons that can abruptly halt a planned behavior You’re about to drive through an intersection when the light suddenly turns red. But you’re able to slam on the brakes, just in time. Johns Hopkins University researchers, working with scientists at the National Institute on Aging, have revealed the precise nerve cells that allow the brain to make this type of split-second change of [...] The post Researchers identify neurons that can abruptly halt a planned behavior appeared first on PsyPost.
Training more effective teachers through alternative pathways In “Licensure and Worker Quality: A Comparison of Alternative Routes to Teaching,” published in The Journal of Law and Economics, Tim R. Sass compares the characteristics and performance of Florida teachers who graduate from traditional university-based teacher preparation programs with those who enter teaching from alternative pathways where a bachelor’s degree in education is not [...] The post Training more effective teachers through alternative pathways appeared first on PsyPost.
Making sense of the connection between obsessive compulsive disorder and sleep Depictions of obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) in entertainment are familiar: Someone methodically soaps up and rinses off their hands four times, or has to open and close a door seven times before leaving a room. They’re particular about their forks and chairs, and establish precise routines from which they can’t bear to deviate. These rituals reflect [...] The post Making sense of the connection between obsessive compulsive disorder and sleep appeared first on PsyPost.
Is there a moral center in our brain? Making moral decisions is a complex process. We have to think about the consequences of our actions for ourselves (will I go to jail?), others (will this person suffer as a consequence of my decision?), and society at large (does society benefit from my choice?). Depending on the situation, it involves brain regions linked to [...] The post Is there a moral center in our brain? appeared first on PsyPost.
Antidepressant trial’s upended results show need for sharing all data In 2001, a “landmark” study published in the prestigious Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry purported to show the safety and effectiveness of using a common antidepressant to treat adolescents. But soon after its publication, both researchers and journalists raised questions about the research. And in an article we published today [...] The post Antidepressant trial’s upended results show need for sharing all data appeared first on PsyPost.
Forever young? A barrier against brain stem cell aging Neural stem cells generate new neurons throughout life in the mammalian brain. However, with advancing age the potential for regeneration in the brain dramatically declines. Scientists have now identified a novel mechanism of how neural stem cells stay relatively free of aging-induced damage. A diffusion barrier regulates the sorting of damaged proteins during cell division.
The Top 10 Body Language Cues of Donald Trump Presidential hopeful, Donald Trump, is certainly a unique individual, with his own personal style (love it or hate it). Here is an analysis of the nonverbal cues that Trump commonly uses, and the possible effects they may have on others.
7 Steps to Conflict Resolution in a Marriage Some marriage conflicts never seem to be resolved. This leaves couples arguing about the same thing over and over. But things do not have to be this way. Most conflicts can be resolved if a consistent process is followed. While these steps may seem time … ...
My Mom Doesn’t Understand What it’s like to be... Every morning, on my drive to work, I call my mom. One might think this makes me a mama’s boy, but it’s more to stave off boredom than anything else. … ...
Let’s Slow Down I have been fighting off a flu bug for the past few days so I’ve been taking it pretty easy and I’m finally starting to feel great again. Unfortunately I’ve … ...
How the brain can stop action on a dime Scientists have identified the precise nerve cells that allow the brain to make a split-second change of course, like jamming on the brakes.
New imaging technique detects early brain damage from hypertension Some people with high blood pressure also have early signs of brain damage, a new imaging technique has found. The damage is linked to difficulties in certain cognitive skills, decision-making, and the ability to regulate emotions. Researchers suggest physicians should start to consider potential brain damage as they treat patients with high blood pressure.
Parkinson's disease: Everyday activity more beneficial than occasional strenuous exercise Parkinson’s patients often become sedentary because of motor symptoms such as gait, balance problems or falls. However, new research finds that non-exercise physical activity, more than occasional trips to the gym, is linked to less severe motor symptoms.
Coffee has secret trick to stop sleep Caffeine is not only a stimulant, but also delays the production of melatonin, the sleep hormone.
Common antidepressant isn't safe for teens, new analysis says Recent study reverses an earlier conclusion, and opens the way for journals to post multiple interpretations of the same experiment.
5 Simple Ways to Practice Self-Care This Week There are all sorts of views on what self-care is and what it looks like. (For instance, in this piece, several clinicians share their diverse thoughts.) According to art therapist Kim Ottinger, LPC, “self-care is anything that allows you to take a moment to appreciate … ...
The Deeper Meaning Of Blame Vs. Punishment In The... Can we accept that someone is responsible for hurting us and not want to see them punished?...
The Personality of Donald Trump The fate of any organization is a function of that organization's leadership. The the United States is no exception to this rule. Further, how a person leads is a function of his or her personality. Thus, we must consider the personality of Republican leading candidate Donald Trump and what it a Trump presidency would mean for the fate of our nation.
Depression Risk Reduced 17% By This Dietary Component Huge study concludes that a food can reduce depression risk in men and women. » Continue reading: Depression Risk Reduced 17% By This Dietary Component