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Should I NOT Use Insurance for Therapy? I find myself slightly baffled by some people’s insistence to use their health insurance when it comes to psychotherapy or counseling. I get calls all the time where someone says, “Nathan, I … ...
Five Reasons We Play the Blame Game When something goes wrong in your life, is your first reaction to blame someone else? If so, you’re engaging in the very common behavior of the blame game. Unfortunately, there are no winners in this game, so knowing the 5 reasons for why you do this will benefit your relationships.
Today I Love This Sullen, Brooding Day Today I love this sullen, brooding day. I love the darkly moody sky as it whisks by, I love that it is crowding close to the earth and threatening more … ...
Which Came First? Understanding Cross-Addiction Have you ever wondered why an individual who chooses to discontinue one addictive substance often picks up another? Maybe a recovering alcoholic now drinks an increased amount of coffee or energy drinks? Or a former smoker finds himself with an intense desire to eat…and eat…and … ...
Psychology Around the Net: September 19, 2015 Happy Saturday, Psych Central readers! Although the official start of fall is rapidly approaching, we still have a few warm-weather days ahead of us. Before venturing out to enjoy yours, take a look at some of the hottest psychology-related topics we’ve gathered for you today! … ...
Down syndrome research untangles therapeutic possibilities for Alzheimer’s More than five million Americans are living with Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Of them, 400,000 also have Down syndrome. Both groups have similar looking brains with higher levels of the protein beta amyloid. In fact, patients with Down syndrome develop the abnormal protein at twice the rate. Results of a pilot study, published in the September [...] The post Down syndrome research untangles therapeutic possibilities for Alzheimer’s appeared first on PsyPost.
Researchers report major breakthrough in understanding Alzheimer’s disease Scientists at Trinity College Dublin have shed light on a fundamental mechanism underlying the development of Alzheimer’s disease, which could lead to new forms of therapy for those living with the condition. Alzheimer’s is the most common form of dementia globally and affects up to 40,000 people in Ireland today. It is the fourth leading [...] The post Researchers report major breakthrough in understanding Alzheimer’s disease appeared first on PsyPost.
Researchers determine how groups make decisions From Beats headphones’ rise to prominence or a political candidate’s surge in the polls to how ants and bees select a new nest site, decisions emerging from groups frequently occur without a leader. Researchers from Carnegie Mellon University have developed a model that explains how groups make collective decisions when no single member of the [...] The post Researchers determine how groups make decisions appeared first on PsyPost.
Two genes unlock potential for treatment of schizophrenia Research led by scientists from Duke-NUS Graduate Medical School Singapore (Duke-NUS) has linked the abnormal behaviour of two genes (BDNF and DTNBP1) to the underlying cause of schizophrenia. These findings have provided a new target for schizophrenia treatment. Schizophrenia is a devastating mental disorder that affects nearly 1% of the total human population. The dominant [...] The post Two genes unlock potential for treatment of schizophrenia appeared first on PsyPost.
Research offers clues about why people drop out of cognitive behavioral therapy Researchers long have known many people end cognitive behavioral therapy before the recommended course of treatment has ended, but why that happens has remained something of a mystery. “We don’t know why,” said Partha Krishnamurthy, director of the Institute for Health Care Marketing at the University of Houston’s Bauer College of Business. “The person just [...] The post Research offers clues about why people drop out of cognitive behavioral therapy appeared first on PsyPost.
High nitrate beetroot juice improves decision-making during prolonged exercise Rugby players take note: drinking high nitrate beetroot juice improves both sprint performance and decision-making during prolonged intermittent exercise such as rugby and football, according to scientists from the University of Exeter. As excitement mounts for the Rugby World Cup, the research, published in the European Journal of Applied Physiology and available on PubMed, adds [...] The post High nitrate beetroot juice improves decision-making during prolonged exercise appeared first on PsyPost.
An Overthinker’s Nightmare A few years ago I remodeled my kitchen. Having to make that many decisions is an overthinker’s nightmare. If you’ve ever remodeled, you know that it’s one decision after another — fixtures, appliances, countertops, paint. Do you even know how many models of faucets are … ...
Dating Imperfectly It’s been 6 months since my devastating break-up of a relationship of over 5 & 1/2 years long. I said I wouldn’t date for 6 months. Give myself some time … ...
Hydrocortisone effects on neurodevelopment for extremely low birthweight infants Hydrocortisone is one of the 15 most frequently prescribed medications in extremely low birth weight infants in the newborn intensive care unit (NICU). Despite widespread use, the effects on neurodevelopmental outcomes of stress doses of hydrocortisone or of dosing after 1 week of age have not been assessed in randomized trials. Additionally, the benefit of [...] The post Hydrocortisone effects on neurodevelopment for extremely low birthweight infants appeared first on PsyPost.
Identifying typical patterns in the progression towards Alzheimer’s disease How the brain progresses from mild cognitive impairment (MCI) to Alzheimer’s-type dementia has been an enigma for the scientific community. However, a recent study by the team of Dr. Sylvie Belleville, PhD, Director of the Research Centre at the Institut universitaire de gériatrie de Montréal (Montreal Geriatric Institute) and Professor of Psychology at Université de [...] The post Identifying typical patterns in the progression towards Alzheimer’s disease appeared first on PsyPost.
Types of athletic training affect how brain communicates with muscles Using endurance training or strength and resistance training not only prepares an athlete for different types of sports, they can also change the way the brain and muscles communicate with each other. A University of Kansas study shows that the communication between the brain and quadriceps muscles of people who take part in endurance training, [...] The post Types of athletic training affect how brain communicates with muscles appeared first on PsyPost.
Understanding a Sports Fan’s Version of PTSD As the New York Mets prepare to host their cross-town rivals, the Yankees, for a three-game series, they lead their division by 8 games with only 16 games left to play. … ...
What is Optimal Media Exposure for Children (and Adults)?... As a Dad of 3 young boys I’m always interested in what the latest research says on how we should be introducing screens to our kids. Screens are a part … ...
Eating Fish Helps Curb Depression Depressed? You might want to have fish for dinner. A new study has found that eating a lot of fish may help reduce the risk of depression. The meta-analysis of … ...
Spike activity 18-09-2015 Quick links from the past week in mind and brain news: GlaxoSmithKline straight-up lied about teen suicide attempts in a trial that was used to convince regulators that Paxil was safe for kids. In-depth from the BMJ. Good summary from The Atlantic. The New York Times on basically the same shit from Johnson & Johnson […]