Article Description
Feeling S.A.D? How to Battle Seasonal Affective Disorder.... Autumn and winter are beautiful seasons. The  leaves changing colors, the air grows sharp and crisp, snow and frost and ice appear. It sounds lovely, doesn’t it? Except, for some … ...
Why is an object’s size perceived the same regardless of changes in distance? Neural mechanism of size constancy clarified Scientists have found that neurons in the monkey visual cortical area V4*1, one of the areas in the visual cortex, calculate the size of an object based on information on its retinal image size and the distance from the object.
Today I Love Last Night’s Moon Today I love coffee with the moon, that's a memory I'll keep for some time. Dark roast for a dark and mighty super moon in total eclipse....
What I needed Was An ADHD Retreat I spent much of my weekend at a writers’ retreat, and it was great. Awful, but great. First, let’s cover the awful. It started on Friday evening, I got there … ...
Bipolar Disorder & ADHD Combined: The Results of Boredom... Adult ADHD and Bipolar Disorder have a few of things in common. For one, they are genetically linked. That doesn’t mean that they will always occur together or even that … ...
Are Diesel Cars Responsible for Rising Rates of Autism? The authors of the current study point out that several previous investigations have also found associations of air pollution with autism. These studies suggest increased chances of having a child with Autistic Spectrum Disorder following higher exposures to diesel particulate matter, as well as proximity to a freeway.
Is Your Therapist Helping You Enough? Is your weekly appointment just a time to vent? What do you do when your therapy seems to be going nowhere? Chances are you came to therapy because you wanted something you felt you couldn’t achieve on your own. You were unhappy or discouraged; maybe … ...
Little Life Changes Inspired by the Science of Happiness “How have you changed your life since starting The Science of Happiness?” That’s the question we posed to over 50,000 students taking the free online course, conducted by the UC Berkeley Greater Good Science Center—and the answers were inspiring. Meredith, for example, has been battling cancer. “I am working so hard to keep my mind happy and focused so I can return to work happy, not bitter or angry,” she said. The course inspired her to start taking morning power walks—rain or shine—that give her a sense of control and peace. She signed up for a painting course and is thinking of learning guitar and studying mindfulness. “The importance of being aware is more key than the happiness itself,” she has learned. Meanwhile, Geraldine was feeling down and unmotivated, but our wonderful community of GG101xers on Facebook showed up to offer support. One day later, she wrote, “What a difference 24 hours makes. I feel like a completely different person to yesterday.” Some of the course material inspired her to seek out small positive moments: feeling the sun shining in the park, seeing a seal at the beach. “It made me feel happy and privileged to be in that place at that time and I would have missed it all if I hadn’t made that choice to do something positive,” she said. Other students have taken the happiness practices to heart, and are working on exercises like Three Good Things and Active Listening. Marge tried both with her partner, and was pleased with the results: “I was surprised how much [Three Good Things] did upturn my mood in general. I’d talk about it with my partner, and he would suggest things for me, then he’d verbally say three things for himself. It has lifted his mood. I also did the Active Listening practice with him [and] we had a very positive experience: What he said wasn’t anything I hadn’t heard before, but the way I listened and responded was different, and it was a good moment between us.” Sounds like a great habit to keep up! Geraldine found support in the GG101x community, and many other students love the experience of interacting with other happiness enthusiasts from the far corners of the world—or right in their hometown. Leslie was ushering an event at her community center in San Francisco when she mentioned the course to a fellow usher…who already knew about it! Mazen shared on our Facebook group. “It’s just simply amazing seeing all this positivity shining around this group,” she said. “This is definitely one of my three good things today.” Are you taking GG101x? How is it affecting you? Keep sending us your personal experiences at happinesscourse@berkeley.edu.
Four Essential Keys to Successful Teaching If you’re a teacher of any sort, then your success is primarily marked by the success of your students. Interested in keys to cultivating student success? Read on.
The Moon and Our Moods   So much research has been done regarding the lunar effect and whatever your belief may be regarding it, I’m going to share a little of my experience on this … ...
3 Tips for the Working Mom: Work-Life Balance Almost any mom can tell you about the challenges of balancing the many roles and responsibilities she has to manage in her day to day life. Whether you work from home or outside the home, I bet you can relate to the struggle of trying … ...
What Makes Someone a Master Manipulator? Among those afflicted with certain personality disorders, there are many who are master manipulators. Do personality disorders cause people to develop into master manipulators? The connection may not be as you expect.
Suppressing truth and urination: Study uncovers a bizarre way to become a better liar Some people a great liars, inventing stories and concealing truths without the slightest slip-up. Other, unfailingly-transparent people are incapable of fudging a single, mundane detail without getting shifty-eyed. But, there’s a trick, courtesy of recent psychology research, that terrible liars can use to fib like the sneakiest confidence man — and it requires nothing but willingness to endure physical [...] The post Suppressing truth and urination: Study uncovers a bizarre way to become a better liar appeared first on PsyPost.
How to quantify feeling good: Five ways to measure happiness If someone told you that the question about whether happiness could be measured was settled and the issue at hand is how to use happiness data, would you believe it? Most would say no, but a growing number of psychologists, economists, community activists, and policy makers are proving that happiness is quantifiable and that the [...] The post How to quantify feeling good: Five ways to measure happiness appeared first on PsyPost.
The science of sexy time: Sleep researcher explains the best time to make love at every age There’s that great bit in Annie Hall when Annie and Alvy Singer are shown in splitscreen at their respective therapists’ offices. In response to their shrinks asking how often they have sex, Annie says, “Constantly. I’d say three times a week,” while Alvy laments: “Hardly ever, like three times a week.” It’s a funny scene for a few reasons, but [...] The post The science of sexy time: Sleep researcher explains the best time to make love at every age appeared first on PsyPost.
New technique negotiates neuron jungle to target source of Parkinson’s disease Researchers from Imperial College London and Newcastle University believe they have found a potential new way to target cells of the brain affected by Parkinson’s disease. The new technique is relatively non-invasive and has worked to improve symptoms of the disease in rats. Parkinson’s disease causes progressive problems with movement, posture and balance. It is [...] The post New technique negotiates neuron jungle to target source of Parkinson’s disease appeared first on PsyPost.
Brain imaging study shows women experience negative emotions differently than men Women react differently to negative images compared to men, which may be explained by subtle differences in brain function. This neurobiological explanation for women’s apparent greater sensitivity has been demonstrated by researchers at the CIUSSS de l’Est-de-l’Île-de-Montréal (Institut universitaire en santé mentale de Montréal) and the University of Montreal, whose findings were published today in [...] The post Brain imaging study shows women experience negative emotions differently than men appeared first on PsyPost.
Food comas: Why eating sometimes makes you sleepy We’ve all done it, enjoyed a delicious meal only to nod off in a comfy chair for a while. For some of us, this is just a habit. But for others, it’s unavoidable. So what is it about food that can make us so sleepy? When we’re eating, the stomach is producing gastrin, a hormone [...] The post Food comas: Why eating sometimes makes you sleepy appeared first on PsyPost.
Neuroscientists identify a brain circuit that encodes time and place When you remember a particular experience, that memory has three critical elements — what, when, and where. MIT neuroscientists have now identified a brain circuit that processes the “when” and “where” components of memory. This circuit, which connects the hippocampus and a region of the cortex known as entorhinal cortex, separates location and timing into [...] The post Neuroscientists identify a brain circuit that encodes time and place appeared first on PsyPost.
Toddler-like robot shows babies time their smiles to make their moms smile in return Why do babies smile when they interact with their parents? Could their smiles have a purpose? In the Sept. 23 issue of PLOS ONE, a team of computer scientists, roboticists and developmental psychologists confirm what most parents already suspect: when babies smile, they do so with a purpose–to make the person they interact with smile [...] The post Toddler-like robot shows babies time their smiles to make their moms smile in return appeared first on PsyPost.