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Helicopter Parenting & College Students’ Increased Neediness College counseling services report increases in emotional fragility and decreases in self-efficacy in college students over recent years. What is the evidence that these changes may be the result of a rise in over-protective, over-controlling, intrusive (helicopter) parenting?
The Alternative to Drugs My opposition to psychiatric drugs is not just that they are harmful, dangerous, and destructive. That would be plenty motivation enough. And it is. But in addition, my profession, which I love and value, has been hijacked by the APA and Big Pharma.
Where Adult Friendships Go to Die This has been a year of transitions. Or changes. Or losses. Or simply choices, depending on how you look at it. Several years ago, I had a really big “aha moment.” It … ...
Overprotected and Underprepared: Why Avoiding Stress Might Not Be...     Evelynn M. Hammonds, the former dean of Harvard College, is credited with using the term “overprotected and underprepared” when describing her class of incoming freshman. Hammonds went on to … ...
Alzheimer risk impairs 'satnav' function of the brain Young adults with genetically increased Alzheimer's risk have altered activation patterns in a brain region that is crucial for spatial navigation.
The Play Community Because our basis for trust and safety has broadened to such an extent that it resides not in any particular game but in our very relationship
Active body, active mind: The secret to a younger brain may lie in exercising your body It is widely recognized that our physical fitness is reflected in our mental fitness, especially as we get older. How does being physically fit affect our aging brains? Neuroimaging studies, in which the activity of different parts of the brain can be visualized, have provided some clues. Until now, however, no study has directly linked brain activation with both mental and physical performance.
Letter to Future Americans Dear Americans living in 2100, I am writing you from the year 2015. Those of us living now, often look back upon the past and wonder, “How could people live … ...
Why Were So Many People So Drawn to a... The New York Times published a very long story about a man who died totally alone in his New York apartment, undiscovered until the smell of his rotting body motivated … ...
Today I Love Donuts Today I love donuts, because … donuts! I love the feeling of being inside on a really cold morning and knowing that I’ll have to bundle up to go out. … ...
I Haven’t Accepted My Bipolar Disorder I was diagnosed with bipolar disorder seven years ago. I was diagnosed with anxiety disorder 13 years ago. You would think with all this time, and the fact that I … ...
How to Treat Borderline Personality Disorder (Part 2) Professionals often view patients with borderline personality as manipulative, selfish people. This negative view is destructive to treatment. As soon as the therapist views the patient negatively, the therapist is feeding into one of the patient’s unhealthy “modes” (see How to treat Borderline Personality Disorder … ...
Best of Our Blogs: October 23, 2015 For today’s Best of Our Blogs, our bloggers bring you insightful information about how important it is to notice your own resistance to change, steps you can take to navigate difficult times, ideas for more effectively dealing with teen rage, and more. 7 Signs You … ...
The Right Way, The Wrong Way, and The ADHD Way There are many things that can be done the right way or the wrong way. And there are rather a lot of things that can be done different ways. To … ...
The Amount of Sleep We REALLY Need Modern thinking about how much sleep you should get questioned by new study. » Continue reading: The Amount of Sleep We REALLY Need
Web of illusion: how the internet affects our confidence in what we know The internet can give us the illusion of knowledge, making us think we are smarter than we really are. Fortunately, there may be a cure for our arrogance, writes psychologist Tom Stafford. The internet has a reputation for harbouring know-it-alls. Commenters on articles, bloggers, even your old school friends on Facebook all seem to swell […]
Study links insecure maternal attachment to math anxiety in children Whether or not a child expresses insecure attachment to their mother can predict the degree to which they experience math anxiety and achievement in mathematics, according to the findings of Guy Bosmans and Bert De Smedt in their study published in the October 2015 issue of Frontiers in Psychology. The researchers, from the University of [...]
Antidepressants and Alzheimer’s disease drugs might boost recovery in stroke patients Evidence is mounting that drugs used to treat depression and Alzheimer’s disease also can help patients recover from strokes. But there are conflicting findings from studies of these and other drugs given to recovering stroke patients. Large, well-designed studies are needed before any drug can be recommended routinely for stroke recovery, according to a study [...]
Explainer: what are false memories? Recent media reports have raised questions over the therapy undergone by several people making allegations of historical sexual abuse against prominent public figures. In particular, it has been suggested that certain forms of therapy run a high risk of unintentionally generating false memories of sexual abuse. But why are there such fears around these kind [...]
Highly religious Americans are less likely to see conflict between faith and science A majority of the public (59%) says science and religion often conflict, while 38% says science and religion are mostly compatible. But people’s sense that there is a conflict between religion and science seems to have less to do with their own religious beliefs than it does with their perceptions of other people’s beliefs, according [...]