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This Way of Socialising Cuts Depression Risk In Half The type of socialising that protects your mental health. » Continue reading: This Way of Socialising Cuts Depression Risk In Half
Strategies for Combatting Verbal Abuse The 1800’s nursery rhyme, “Sticks and stones may break my bones but words will never hurt me” is not true for most people. Some people do have the natural ability to emotionally disconnect when being insulted.  (They usually struggle with being emotionally engaged in pleasant … ...
Steps Taken to Individualize Obesity Treatment Earlier this year, The Journal of Public Health (April 2015) indicated recognition of six separate subgroups of obese patients in the United States. This finding is significant because it is a step toward individualizing obesity treatment rather than having a “one size fits all” approach … ...
Why Nature is So Good for Your Mental Health Where did you go on your last vacation? If you live in the city or the suburbs, there’s a good chance that you spent it in a natural setting, perhaps at a national park, the beach or a cabin in the mountains. Most of us … ...
Going Deeply into a Question Whenever I read Jiddu Krishnamurti – which is often – I savor a frequent-flyer phrase of his: “going deeply into a question.”  For example, he might say: “Let us go … ...
A Cure for Dandruff? Finally?   When your editor wants more depth in your articles, dandruff is not a good subject to select. Google “dandruff” and a few million results will return – and almost … ...
Frequent School Moves Hurt Low-Income Children's Math Scores Attention, cognitive skills also impaired after several school moves
Is the ‘successful psychopath’ a myth or reality? Is successful psychopathy an oxymoron? What’s the difference between psychopaths who spend their lives in prison and those who excel in society? These are some of the questions examined in a new study published in Current Directions in Psychological Science. The study, a scientific status report on early and current research, seeks to define “successful [...]
Postcoital Dysphoria: Study examines why nearly half of women have suffered ‘post-sex blues’ Hey, ladies: After a roll in the hay, do you find yourself wiping the tears away? You might have Postcoital Dysphoria (PCD), aka the “post-sex blues,” a self-explanatory condition marked by “tearfulness, a sense of melancholy or depression, anxiety, agitation, or aggression following sexual intercourse.” In a recent study of 230 college-aged Australian women, 46 [...]
Narcissists are not always risk-takers — despite what they say Maybe narcissists aren’t always such big risk-takers after all, a new study suggests. Many studies have found that narcissists often make volatile and risky decisions, possibly because they tend to have inflated views of their own abilities and achievements. But in a series of three experiments, researchers found that people who scored higher on measures [...]
A ‘black’-sounding name makes people imagine a larger, more dangerous person In a study exploring racial bias and how people use their mind’s-eye image of an imagined person’s size to represent someone as either threatening or high-status, UCLA researchers found that people envisioned men with stereotypically black names as bigger and more violent. The study, published today in the journal Evolution and Human Behavior, sought to [...]
Everyone has their own daily rhythm of digital activity, shows study Over the past decade, there has been a surge of scientific studies on the digital activity of people, such as making mobile calls, texting, e-mailing, and posting on social media. Because nearly all human behavior leaves a digital footprint, scientists can use such digital activity as a proxy to track human activity in general, for [...]
Attention’s place in the human cognitive architecture Neuroscientists can’t build a brain, so they have settled with reverse engineering–learning a lot about each part in hopes that they can understand how all of the pieces fit together. In a Neuron special issue on “Cognitive Architecture,” published October 7, researchers present integrated theories on how processes–such as attention, body self-consciousness, and language–function within [...]
Sex is more likely on days college students use marijuana or binge drink Undergraduate college students were more likely to have sex on days they used marijuana or binged on alcohol than on days they didn’t, new research from Oregon State University has found. Binge drinking and being in a serious dating relationship also were linked with less condom use, putting young adults at risk for sexually-transmitted infections [...]
Don’t Judge Me – Mental Illness Awareness Week I know, I know, we are halfway through Mental Illness Awareness Week and I haven’t said a word. In a way, I was wondering what I was going to post. … ...
7 Things I Learned about Myself After Getting a Dog As I may have mentioned, my family and I just got a new puppy — a cockapoo named Barnaby. He’s fourteen weeks old, and super sweet and delightful. However, he is a dog, and even more so, he’s a puppy. I knew that his arrival in … ...
Highly Curious Approach to Gaining Power Over Anxiety When anxiety hits, most of us cower to it. We submit to the primal instinct that says, fight, freeze or flee! What if we did something different by conscious choice … ...
The psychological origins of procrastination – and how we can stop putting things off “I love deadlines,” English author Douglas Adams once wrote. “I love the whooshing noise they make as they go by.” We’ve all had the experience of wanting to get a project done but putting it off for later. Sometimes we wait because we just don’t care enough about the project, but other times we care [...]
Risk of suicide appears to increase after weight loss surgery A study of a large group of adults who underwent bariatric surgery finds that the risk for self-harm emergencies increased after the surgery, according to a study published online by JAMA Surgery. Morbid obesity is an epidemic in affluent countries; approximately 6 percent of Americans are morbidly obese. Mental health problems are prevalent in morbidly [...]
Online peer networks can motivate people to exercise more Can the Web make people more fit? It’s a question hot on the minds of everyone from health insurers to gym owners to public health officials. Although millions of dollars a year are being spent designing promotional ads and social media campaigns, they clearly aren’t working: more than 43 percent of Americans get insufficient levels [...]