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Closing In On “Close Reading” If you haven’t heard this latest buzz phrase, you will soon. Standardized tests and schools alike are shifting their focus towards cultivating not just more reading, but reading that is deep, … ...
Show us your smarts: A very brief history of intelligence testing The scientific study of human intelligence dates back well over 100 years. In that time there have been numerous schools of thought about how to measure intelligence. The core disagreement between researchers and theorists about intelligence is around whether it’s genetic or largely influenced by the environment; whether it’s nature or nurture. In the late [...]
Children in foster care three times more likely to have ADHD diagnosis Researchers already knew that attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) was the most common behavioral health diagnosis among children enrolled in Medicaid. A new study to be presented at the American Academy of Pediatrics 2015 National Conference & Exhibition in Washington, DC, found that children in foster care were three times more likely than others to have an [...]
People can raise their pain threshold by altering brain chemistry, arthritis study shows Scientists at The University of Manchester have shown for the first time that the numbers of opiate receptors in the brain increases to combat severe pain in arthritis sufferers. Chronic pain — pain which lasts for more than six months — is a real problem for many people with approximately 46% of the UK population [...]
Alzheimer risk impairs ‘satnav’ function of the brain Young adults with genetically increased Alzheimer’s risk have altered activation patterns in a brain region that is crucial for spatial navigation. This is reported by the team headed by Prof Nikolai Axmacher from the Ruhr-Universität Bochum, together with colleagues from the universities of Bonn, Nijmegen and Ulm in the journal Science, which appears on October [...]
Why Baby Talk Is Good for Your Infant If you’ve ever been around a newborn infant, you probably found yourself engaging in some sort of baby talk. Most adults can’t seem to help themselves. Psychologists call this kind of talk directed at a baby “infant-directed speech.” And believe it or not, they’ve studied … ...
Halloween: Are We Perpetuating Stigma?   I live outside of the city in a very rural area. There aren’t many streetlights up here on the Hill and it gets very dark. If you were walking … ...
Why Do The Lonely Stay Lonely? A new research study published in the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology takes a closer look at chronic loneliness in adolescents and how they respond to being socially included or excluded. Results suggest that ear of rejection can play a powerful role in reinforcing long-term patterns of loneliness.
What To Do When The Paranoia Gets the Best of You Today I was standing in line at a bakery waiting for a sandwich and I don’t know what it was about the place, it could have been the temperature, the … ...
Parent Abuse When rebelling turns into abusing, it's vital for parents take a stand. Remember, parent abuse only thrives when authority is weak.
Marriage: This Protects Couples Against Divorce This protects couples from divorce and reduces the damaging effects of poor communication. » Continue reading: Marriage: This Protects Couples Against Divorce
Today I Love The Autumn Trees Today I love the way the autumn trees prepare themselves for the long night of winter. Some of them cast down their leaves in petulant fits of anger, you can … ...
Maximize Your Happiness by Turning on Your Microflow With all the criticism we hear about multitasking, no one ever talks about the upside of engaging your brain in more than one activity at a time. Yet, multitasking might just be the best way to avoid being bored while you’re kept waiting or just stuck in a meeting. Turn your downtime into uptime by seeking the microflow experience.
Psychology Around the Net: October 24, 2015 Happy Saturday, Psych Central readers! This week’s Psychology Around the Net brings you the latest information on why we do (or don’t) chow down during stressful times, machines that can detect depression in a person’s facial expressions, and an introduction to Julia, Sesame Street‘s new … ...
What is Trauma Bonding? One thing often asked by those in the helping profession when confronted with a person in an unhealthy relationship is, “Why do you stay?”  This question has implications of weakness and failure on the part of the victim and usually causes shame.  Rather than asking this … ...
When Kids Collide: Successfully Merging Stepsiblings Stepparent-stepchild relationships can often be tricky and initially full of landmines. A whole host of question swirl around the relationship when the new family is first created and there is … ...
This is the One Question Women Ask Every Day My last Quick Fix cartoon was about Halloween. And making faces. For any cartoon you enjoy, you’re invited to share it anyplace except Pinterest. (Pinterest grabs the whole image, which … ...
5 Precious Gifts to Give Yourself (That Just Happen... “The greatest gift you can give yourself is a little bit of your own attention.” — Anthony J. D’Angelo The other day, when I was out celebrating a friend’s birthday, someone asked about the best gift I’d ever received. What came to mind was getting … ...
Conducting Regular Self-Care Check-Ins In order to respond to our needs, we must know them in the first place. We must tune into ourselves and ask and listen. That’s where doing a regular check-in … ...
Welcome to The Recovery Expert Developing the tools to better understand yourself is important skill to learn. Whether it’s trying to recover from a trauma or the hurt of a past relationship, recovery is an often complex process. But a person can recover from the damage in their lives caused … ...